The specialist skills of aerospace production systems are vital to drive productivity improvements. You will gain the sought-after capability to manage major improvement programmes in the aerospace manufacturing industry or instigate intervention that delivers improvements to the performance of their businesses.

Overview

  • Start dateFull-time: March and October. Part-time: throughout the year
  • DurationFull-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years
  • DeliveryTaught modules 40%, Group project 20% (dissertation for part-time students), Individual project 40%
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time / Part-time
  • CampusCranfield campus

Who is it for?

This course develops future aerospace manufacturing engineers and managers who will be able to manage major improvement programmes or instigate intervention that delivers improvements to the performance of their aerospace manufacturing businesses.

Why this course?

The course combines Cranfield's long standing expertise for delivering high-quality Masters' programmes in both aerospace and manufacturing. Courses receive strong support from the global aerospace industry, both the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM) such as Airbus and Rolls-Royce, as well as their tiers of supplier. There is a strong emphasis on applying knowledge in the industrial environment and all teaching is in the context of industrial application. Many features of this course are shared with the Engineering and Management of Manufacturing Systems MSc, but this course specifically prepares graduates to embark on a career in aerospace manufacturing. 

Students benefit from our wide range of equipment, analysis tools and specialist software packages. The course objectives are achieved through a carefully integrated and structured series of eight one-week assessed modules, a group project and an individual project.

Informed by Industry

Our courses are designed to meet the training needs of industry and have a strong input from experts in their sector. Students who have excelled have their performances recognised through course awards. The awards are provided by high profile organisations and individuals, and are often sponsored by our industrial partners. Awards are presented on Graduation Day. 

Accreditation

The MSc in Aerospace Manufacturing is subject to ratification by Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) & Insitution of Engineering & Technology (IET) following an accreditation visit in March 2015, on behalf of the Engineering Council as meeting the requirements for Further Learning for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Candidates must hold a CEng accredited BEng/BSc (Hons) undergraduate first degree to comply with full CEng registration requirements.

Please note accreditation applies to the MSc award. PgDip and PgCert do not meet in full the further learning requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

Course details

March intake:  The course comprises eight compulsory modules, a group project and an individual project.

October intake: The course comprises eight modules (five compulsory and three electives), a group project and an individual project.

The modules include lectures, workshops, case studies, tutorials and company visits. Students need to complete a mix of modules that are fundamental to aerospace manufacturing systems and modules that are technology related.


Group project

The group project experience is highly valued by both students and prospective employers. Teams of students work to solve an industrial problem. The project applies technical knowledge and provides training in teamwork and the opportunity to develop non-technical aspects of the taught programme. Part-time students can prepare a dissertation on an agreed topic in place of the group project.

Industrially orientated, our team projects have support from external organisations. As a result of external engagement Cranfield students enjoy a higher degree of success when it comes to securing employment. Prospective employers value the student experience where team working to find solutions to industrially based problems is concerned.

View our Manufacturing, Materials and Design 2015 Manufacturing Group Projects

Watch video: Paul Ewers, Visteon Engineering Services, talks about his involvement in the Manufacturing Group Project at Cranfield University

Individual project

The individual thesis project, usually in collaboration with industry, offers students the opportunity to develop their research capability, depth of understanding and ability to provide solutions to real problems in aerospace manufacturing production systems.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project 20% (dissertation for part-time students), Individual project 40%
manufacturing group embedded video
Manufacturing industry impact: the benefit of group projects

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory modules and (where applicable) some elective modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Operations Management

Module Leader
  • Professor Harris Makatsoris
Aim

    To introduce core factors of managing operations.


Syllabus
    • An introduction to manufacturing and service activities
    • Capacity, demand and load; identifying key capacity determinant; order-size mix problem; coping with changes in demand
    • Standard times, and how to calculate them; process analysis and supporting tools; process simplification
    • What quality is; standards and frameworks; quality tools; quality in the supply chain
    • Scheduling rules; scheduling and nested set-ups
    • Roles of inventory; dependent and independent demand; Economic Order Quantity; uncertain demand; inventory management systems and measures
    • Information systems – at operational, managerial, and strategic levels; bills of material; MRP, MPRll and ERP systems
    • Ohno’s 7 wastes; Just-in-Time systems (including the Toyota Production System, and Kanbans)
    • Class discussion of cases, exercises, and videos to support this syllabus
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Apply the ‘Framework for the Management of Operations’ to all operations, from pure service to pure manufacturing.
2. Identify the key capacity determinant in an operation, and carry out an analysis to develop the most appropriate approach in response to changes in demand.
3. Select and apply appropriate approaches and tools to determine standards and improve processes.
4. Determine the information needed to support businesses, in particular manufacturing operations.
5. Analyse problems rigorously to develop options, and select an appropriate option taking into consideration relevant factors such as risk, opportunities, cost, flexibility, and time to implement.
6. Select appropriate Just-in-Time (JIT) tools to improve operations.
7. Develop appropriate quality systems for the whole of their supply chain – from supplier, through operations to customers – and ensure these systems are sustained and a culture of continuous improvement prevails.

Manufacturing Systems Engineering

Module Leader
  • Professor Harris Makatsoris
Aim

    To develop students’ understanding of manufacturing systems engineering in order to analyse and (re)design manufacturing systems that maximise value to customers while minimising waste.

Syllabus
    • Design of layouts.
    • Human centred factory design.
    • Group Technology & Cellular manufacturing.
    • Different approaches to factory layout such as process and product layouts.
    • Reasons for choice of cellular manufacturing and benefits.
    • Manufacturing Systems modelling using discrete-event simulation.
    • Analysis of manufacturing systems using simulation.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Differentiate the applicability of different layout types applicable in manufacturing businesses.
2. Assess how production layout and system design influences productivity
3. Appraise the effectiveness of cellular configurations .
4. Design a graphical simulation model using an industry leading discrete-event simulation tool.
5. Contrast discrete-event simulation to other modelling techniques especially in addressing emerging manufacturing paradigms.
6. Devise an experimental procedure and interpret the consequential results of the simulation model.

Enterprise Modelling

Module Leader
  • Dr John Ahmet Erkoyuncu
Aim

    To extend the student’s ability to evaluate integrated knowledge systems within the context of the wider enterprise environment through the application of modelling and simulation tools, techniques and methodologies.


Syllabus
    • Introduction to modelling: taxonomy, overview of methods and techniques;
    • Enterprise Modelling and lean concepts and architecture
    • Structured Systems Analysis methodology, Process description capture tools and techniques, Object state transition network;
    • Discrete-event simulation, Systems dynamics and Agent-based simulation techniques and methodologies;
    • Case study analysis, use of industry-based software tools
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Distinguish the concepts of modelling approaches and architecture.
2. Analyse challenges in the capture and representation of business knowledge for the purpose of modelling.
3. Critically evaluate the opportunities in a business where modelling and simulation can add value.
4. Construct and apply different modelling & simulation tools used in producing enterprise models.

Supply Chain Management

Module Leader
  • Dr Ahmed Al-Ashaab
Aim

    To develop skills to analyse and manage the direction of a business, to design and develop manufacturing strategy to deliver competitive advantage and plan effective deployment of a strategy.


Syllabus
    • Competitive manufacturing strategy concepts.
    • Benchmarking of manufacturing system performance.
    • Manufacturing strategy in business success.
    • Strategy formation and formulation, leading on to system design.
    • Structured strategy formulation and system design methodologies.
    • Approaches to strategy formulation in differing business contexts.
    • Realisation of new strategies/system designs, including approaches to implementation.
    • Case study on design of competitive manufacturing strategy.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Describe the role of manufacturing within business strategy.
2. Define and explain manufacturing strategy process and content, emergent and intended strategy, competitive edge criteria and decision areas.
3. Explain how the various approaches to manufacturing strategy formation complement different business circumstances.
4. Demonstrate manufacturing strategy formulation.
5. Apply a structured methodology to create a manufacturing strategy.
6. Assess the impact of a proposed manufacturing strategy on business performance.

Manufacturing Strategy

Module Leader
  • Dr Patrick McLaughlin
Aim

    To develop skills to analyse and manage the direction of a business, to design and develop manufacturing strategy to deliver competitive advantage and plan effective deployment of a strategy.

Syllabus
    • Competitive manufacturing strategy concepts.
    • Benchmarking of manufacturing system performance.
    • Manufacturing strategy in business success.
    • Strategy formation and formulation, leading on to system design.
    • Structured strategy formulation and system design methodologies.
    • Approaches to strategy formulation in differing business contexts.
    • Realisation of new strategies/system designs, including approaches to implementation.
    • Case study on design of competitive manufacturing strategy.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Describe the role of manufacturing within business strategy.
2. Define and explain manufacturing strategy process and content, emergent and intended strategy, competitive edge criteria and decision areas.
3. Explain how the various approaches to manufacturing strategy formation complement different business circumstances.
4. Demonstrate manufacturing strategy formulation.
5. Apply a structured methodology to create a manufacturing strategy.
6. Assess the impact of a proposed manufacturing strategy on business performance.

Aircraft Assembly

Module Leader
  • Professor Phil Webb
Aim

    To develop students’ understanding of aircraft assembly methods and techniques that are effective and efficient and at the same time meet quality and safety requirements.


Syllabus
    • Joining techniques: bolts, rivets
    • Assembly jigs and fixtures
    • Aircraft assembly layouts and processes
    • Composite wing assembly
    • Automated fastening machines
    • Sealants and adhesives
    • Automation in aircraft assembly
    • Application of metrology
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Apply comprehensive knowledge of manufacturing flow and layout to aircraft assembly.
2. Demonstrate understanding of aircraft structures (fuselage, wing).
3. Appraise various methods of assembly of composite materials.
4. Appraise different advanced joining techniques used in aircraft assembly.
5. Formulate a holistic approach to analysis and design of aircraft assembly processes.
6. Understand the future technologies that will influence the assembly of next generation aircraft.

Elective modules
A selection of modules from the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Machining Moulding and Metrology

Module Leader
  • Dr Isidro Durazo Cardenas
Aim

    To provide the student with an understanding of the principles behind some of the most recent developments in the processing of high value added components. There is a strong emphasis on high efficiency and reduced cost in the manufacture of high volume and/or high value added parts using the latest technology based around advanced machining processes and micro moulding techniques. The module will cover the physical principles, operating characteristics and practical applications of the processes.


Syllabus
    • Metrology and practice
    • Metal cutting processes and practice
    • Abrasive machining processes and practice
    • Non-conventional machining including photochemical machining and associated metal removal and addition processes
    • Micro machining and micro moulding
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Critically review recent developments in machining and fabrication processes for the production of engineering components and identify their main areas of application and limitations.
2. Propose and assess methods to determine the size, geometry and surface topography of manufactured parts.
3. Describe and apply the relationships between material properties, processing conditions and component service performance.
4. Analyse how the physical principles behind the operation of these processes can be used to monitor process capability and performance.
5. Apply design rules and fabrication techniques to manufacture micro components.
6. Assess different routes for the high volume manufacture of micro components.

Composites Manufacturing for High Performance Structures

Module Leader
  • Andrew Mills
Aim

    To provide a detailed awareness of current and emerging manufacturing technology for high performance composite components and structures and an understanding of materials selection and the design process for effective parts manufacturing.


Syllabus
    • Background to thermosetting and thermoplastic polymer matrix composites
    • Practical demonstrations – lab work
    • Overview of established manufacturing processes, developing processes, automation and machining
    • Introduction to emerging process developments; automation, textile preforming, through thickness reinforcement
    • Design for manufacture, assembly techniques and manufacturing cost
    • Case studies from aerospace, automotive, motorsport, marine and energy sectors
    • DVD demonstrations of all processing routes
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Demonstrate awareness of the range of modern manufacturing techniques for thermoset and thermoplastic type composites.
2. Select appropriate manufacturing techniques for a given composite structure/ application.
3. Demonstrate practical handling of prepregs and a range of fibre forms and resins.
4. Describe current areas of technology development for composites processing.
5. Demonstrate awareness of the design process for high performance composite structures and the influence on design of the manufacturing process.
6. Evaluate performance-cost balance implications of materials and process choice.

Precision Engineering

Module Leader
  • Dr Paul Morantz
Aim

    To instil determinism as a precision engineering philosophy and provide awareness and understanding of the principles and state of the art concepts employed in “high end” ultra precision manufacturing industries.


Syllabus
    • This module will introduce determinism as a manufacturing philosophy. introduce the principles applied to precision engineering systems, including:
    • Kinematics, Structures, Slideways, Spindles, bearings, measuring systems, actuators, advanced CNC systems, dynamic performance analysis, machine calibration, geometric error budgeting.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Critically evaluate ultra precision engineering issues in a deterministic and logical manner.
2. Demonstrate fundamental understanding and critical awareness that random results are a consequence of random procedures.
3. Critically review, assess and evaluate the design of precision machines and motion systems based on their adherence to established principles of precision engineering.
4. Articulate a critical awareness that the main enemy of precision and ultra precision motion is uncontrolled or “stray” energy.
5. Demonstrate conceptual thinking to critically evaluate how stray energy influences the response of precision engineering systems.

Failure of Materials and Structures

Module Leader
  • Dr David Ayre
Aim

    To provide an understanding of why materials and structures fail and how failure conditions can be predicted in metallic and non-metallic components and structures.


Syllabus
    • Overview of failure behaviour of cracked bodies; crack size influence, brittle and ductile behaviour; influence of material properties. Cyclic loading and chemical environment. Thermodynamic criteria and energy balance; Griffith’s approach, modifications by Orowan. Strain energy release rate, compliance, applications to fibre composites.
    • LEFM and crack tip stress fields, stress concentration, stress intensity, plane stress and plane strain. Fracture toughness in metallic materials, fracture toughness testing, calculations of critical defect sizes and failure stress. Crack tip plastic zones; the HRR field, CTOD, J Elastic- plastic failure criteria. Defect assessment failure assessment diagrams.
    • Fracture of rigid polymers and standard tests for fracture resistance of polymers. Delamination fatigue tests. Emerging CEN/ISO standards, current ESIS test procedures.
    • Crack extension under cyclic loading; Regimes of fatigue crack growth; Influence of material properties and crack tip plastic zones; Calculation of crack growth life and defect assessment in fatigue; Crack closure and variable amplitude loading; Short cracks and the limits of LEFM.
    • Software design tools for fatigue crack growth.
    • Static loading-stress corrosion cracking; corrosion fatigue.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Identify the different regimes and processes of failure of cracked bodies and describe the factors controlling them and the boundaries and limits between them.
2. Describe the principles of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) and demonstrate their application to cracks in brittle, ductile and fibre composites through calculation of static failure conditions.
3. Calculate the limits of applicability of LEFM and apply modified predictive tools such as elastic-plastic fracture mechanics and failure assessment diagrams for calculation of failure.
4. Apply fracture mechanics to failure of cracked bodies under cyclic loads and under aggressive chemical environments to evaluate and predict service lives of structures.
5. Generate laboratory fracture mechanics data and critically assess its validity for application to particular engineering situations.

Advanced Welding Processes

Module Leader
  • Dr Wojciech Suder
Aim
    The aim of this module is to provide the student with an understanding of the principles behind the most recent developments in welding processes. There is a strong emphasis on laser welding, as well as recent developments in arc, friction and resistance welding. The module will cover the operating principles, characteristics and practical applications of each process.
Syllabus
    • Fundamentals of lasers, optics and fibre optics
    • Laser welding including micro-welding and hybrid processes
    • Laser material interactions
    • Laser sources, optics and fibre optics
    • Advanced arc welding processes
    • Solid state welding processes
    • Friction welding
    • Additive manufacture
    • Advanced resistance welding
    • Dissimilar material welding
    • Repair welding
    • Weld metal engineering
    • Electron beam welding
    • Process monitoring
    • Other laser processes
    • Material characteristics and response to laser
    • Weld metal engineering
    • Laser safety
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Illustrate and describe physical principles behind the operation of these processes.
2. Select the most appropriate welding system for a particular application and analyse the economic benefits.
3. Describe physical and engineering principles behind selective applications for welding processes and critique methods for maximising process efficiency.
4. Appraise recent developments in welding technology and identify where these new processes can be used.

Aircraft Assembly

Module Leader
  • Professor Phil Webb
Aim

    To develop students’ understanding of aircraft assembly methods and techniques that are effective and efficient and at the same time meet quality and safety requirements.


Syllabus
    • Joining techniques: bolts, rivets
    • Assembly jigs and fixtures
    • Aircraft assembly layouts and processes
    • Composite wing assembly
    • Automated fastening machines
    • Sealants and adhesives
    • Automation in aircraft assembly
    • Application of metrology
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Apply comprehensive knowledge of manufacturing flow and layout to aircraft assembly.
2. Demonstrate understanding of aircraft structures (fuselage, wing).
3. Appraise various methods of assembly of composite materials.
4. Appraise different advanced joining techniques used in aircraft assembly.
5. Formulate a holistic approach to analysis and design of aircraft assembly processes.
6. Understand the future technologies that will influence the assembly of next generation aircraft.

March 2017 intake course structure

Taught (80 credits)
Group Project (40 credits)
Individual Project (80 credits)

For March 2017 intake the 8 pre-selected modules will be only available:

  • Operations Management
  • Manufacturing Systems Engineering
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Manufacturing Strategy
  • Aircraft Assembly
  • Machining, Moulding and Metrology
  • Composites Manufacturing for High Performance
  • Operations Analysis

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.


MSc Full-time £10,250
MSc Part-time £1,635 *
PgDip Full-time £8,200
PgDip Part-time £1,635 *
PgCert Full-time £4,510
PgCert Part-time £1,635 *
  • * This course has an annual registration fee and a fee per taught module. The fee quoted above is the annual registration fee and this amount will be invoiced annually. The fee for each taught module is £1,340 and this amount will be payable on attendance. The course consists of a number of taught modules with each module usually worth 10 credits. MSc and PgDip awards consist of 8 taught modules and PgCert awards consist of 6 taught modules. Where a module is worth either 5 credits or 20 credits then the module fee will be adjusted accordingly (so a 5 credit module fee will be halved and a 20 credit module fee will be doubled).
  • ** Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A non-refundable deposit is payable on offer acceptances and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.  Home/EU Students will pay a £500 deposit.  Overseas Students will pay a £1,000 deposit.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

MSc Full-time £20,500
MSc Part-time £20,500 **
PgDip Full-time £16,605
PgDip Part-time £16,605 **
PgCert Full-time £8,300
PgCert Part-time £8,300 **
  • * This course has an annual registration fee and a fee per taught module. The fee quoted above is the annual registration fee and this amount will be invoiced annually. The fee for each taught module is £1,340 and this amount will be payable on attendance. The course consists of a number of taught modules with each module usually worth 10 credits. MSc and PgDip awards consist of 8 taught modules and PgCert awards consist of 6 taught modules. Where a module is worth either 5 credits or 20 credits then the module fee will be adjusted accordingly (so a 5 credit module fee will be halved and a 20 credit module fee will be doubled).
  • ** Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A non-refundable deposit is payable on offer acceptances and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.  Home/EU Students will pay a £500 deposit.  Overseas Students will pay a £1,000 deposit.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

Funding Opportunities

To help students find and secure appropriate funding we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. 

Visit the funding finder.

Global Manufacturing Leadership Masters Scholarship
The Cranfield Global Manufacturing Leadership (GML) scholarships, provided by Cranfield Manufacturing contributes towards the costs of study (tuition fee plus £1000 maintenance grant). Awards are made for a maximum duration of one calendar year for full time study.

ISTAT Foundation Scholarships
The ISTAT Foundation is actively engaged in helping young people develop careers in aviation by offering scholarships of up to $US10,000. One student will be nominated for a scholarship each year by Cranfield University.

Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia)
Cranfield offers competitive scholarships for Mexican students in conjunction with Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia) in science, technology and engineering.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England
A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Santander MSc Scholarship
The Santander Scholarship at Cranfield University is worth £5,000 towards tuition fees for full-time master's courses. Check the scholarship page to find out if you are from an eligible Santander Universities programme country.

Chevening Scholarships
Chevening Scholarships are awarded to outstanding emerging leaders to pursue a one-year master’s at Cranfield university. The scholarship includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS)
The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Commonwealth Scholarships for Developing Countries
Students from developing countries who would not otherwise be able to study in the UK can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship which includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Future Finance Student Loans
Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Entry requirements

A first or second class UK Honours degree or equivalent in a relevant discipline. Other relevant qualifications, together with significant experience, may be considered.

Applicants who do not fulfil the standard entry requirements can apply for the Pre Masters in Engineering, successful completion of which will qualify them for entry to this course for a second year of study.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. Our minimum requirements are as follows:

IELTS Academic – 6.5 overall
TOEFL – 92
Pearson PTE Academic – 65
Cambridge English Scale – 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency – C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Applicants who do not already meet the English language entry requirement for their chosen Cranfield course can apply to attend one of our Presessional English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses. We offer Winter/Spring and Summer programmes each year to offer holders.


3D print lab

Cranfield is the key that can open you the door to the real life environment and if you are willing to work hard to show the world what you are capable of, they will see your true potential and bet for you.

Anxo Rodríguez Rodríguez, Additive Manufacturing Engineer

Your career

This qualification takes you on to a wide range of aerospace manufacturing roles such as management, operations, logistics and technology-related functions within global aerospace manufacturing organisations. Many graduates find employment with one of their project sponsors.

How to apply

Online application form. UK students are normally expected to attend an interview and financial support is best discussed at this time. Overseas and EU students may be interviewed by telephone.