Demand for human factors and safety expertise continues to grow within aviation as well as other safety critical industries. 

This course has been designed to provide industry with equipped graduates who can make a real and lasting improvement to performance and safety through the application of skills and knowledge learnt through a mix of lectures and practical exercises.

At a glance

  • Start dateOctober
  • DurationFull-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Part-time PgCert - two years
  • DeliveryTaught modules 40%, Group projects 20%, Individual research project 40%
  • QualificationMSc, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time / Part-time

Who is it for?

This course attracts a wide variety of students from aviation professionals in civil and military domains to high-quality graduates in engineering and social science disciplines. The wide range of skills and knowledge represented by students on the course provides a learning environment unique to here.

Why this course?

Delivered through the specialist Safety and Accident Investigation Centre, operating for over 30 years to support global safety and investigation, this course is unique in that it synthesises the study of human factors with the study of safety and safety assessment, creating a powerful combination to really add-on value in applied aviation and safety critical contexts.

It is designed to provide industry with successful and well equipped graduates who can make a real and lasting improvement to performance and safety through the application of skills and knowledge learned on the course. Demand for human factors and safety expertise continues to be a growing area within aviation as well as other safety critical industries. Safety critical systems require high human performance in addition to engineering excellence to meet the safety and business requirements of the aviation industry. To meet these demands, the design of systems must match, support and augment the capabilities of the user.

We are very well located for visiting part-time students from all over the world, and offers a range of library and support facilities to support your studies. This enables students from all over the world to complete this qualification whilst balancing work/life commitments.

Your teaching team

Our teaching staff work closely with organisations in the aviation industry including major manufacturers, airlines and operators, maintainers, the military and regulators. Teaching staff include leaders in aviation psychology, human factors, accident investigation and safety sciences:

Course details

The MSc comprises 12 modules; eight compulsory and two of the optional taught modules; and two group project modules. The PgCert consists of three compulsory modules with the remaining modules selected by yourself. You also complete an individual research project.

Group project

Two group projects are completed by students: 

The Capstone Group Project will provide a simulated industrial environment where knowledge and skills gained from the taught components of the course can be consolidated and applied to solving a human factors and safety problem. 

The Applied Safety Assessment module will provide students with an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the Safety Assessment of Aircraft Systems module, in a practical scenario. In addition, the module aims to equip students with the ability to conduct a comprehensive safety assessment on an airframe whist working in a team, and to present the group work both orally and in a written report.

Individual project

Each MSc student is required to undertake an individual research project. The output of this project is a written report presented in the format of a scientific paper. The project aims to provide students with an opportunity to apply the technical and analytical skills taught during the course, in a practical way. The individual research project is a chance to study a specific subject or problem area in much greater depth and use some of the techniques learned during the course. You will be assigned a supervisor who will help to guide you in your research.

Previous Individual Research Projects included:

  • The analysis of behaviour associated with high workload in military air-traffic control
  • Checklist design in General Aviation
  • Safety in ground handling with Menzies Aviation
  • Pilot-autopilot conflict with Airbus.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group projects 20%, Individual research project 40%

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the core modules and some optional modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2016–2017. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2017 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Core modules

Cognitive Ergonomics

Module Leader
  • Nixon, Dr Jim
Aim

    This module aims to provide an introduction to key areas of human psychology that underpin principles, theories and models applied in aviation human factors. Topics in cognitive psychology are introduced and related to key concepts in aviation human factors such as mental workload and situation awareness. The challenges in measuring human cognitive work and performance are introduced together with a range of individual and team assessment methods. The module assumes no previous academic background in psychology or human factors.

Syllabus
    • User Centred Thinking and Understanding User Tasks
    • Human Information Processing
    • Situation Awareness
    • Mental Workload and Stress
    • Teamwork and Sense-making
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Conduct formal analyses in order to understand user tasks and goals in aviation and relate these tasks back to elements of cognition.
  • Describe how humans process sensory information and apply this understanding to a variety of aviation contexts to understand and ensure safe human performance.
  • Evaluate a range of subjective and objective assessment methods available to measure cognitive work performance including assessment of situation awareness, workload and stress.
  • Critically analyse aviation systems according to the extent that they support safe human behaviour and performance.

Human Performance and Error

Module Leader
  • Rashid, Dr Hamad H.S.J.
Aim

    This module aims at providing students with the necessary knowledge and skills to appraise human error and factors affecting human performance, and to apply tools and methods for error prediction and measurement. The module aims to give practical knowledge of error prediction, and to provide an appreciation of other remedial actions. Students will be shown factors that influence human performance, including the effects of fatigue, stress and individual differences. Safety-related interventions like safety management systems and crew resource management will be discussed. Human error prediction techniques will be looked at; leading to the combining of task analysis and Human error taxonomies and the use of SHERPA as a major error prediction tool. A course exercise will be run using data from Boeing 737 cockpit. Practical experiments in human error measurements will be undertaken, in groups, to examine ways of measuring human error. 

Syllabus
    • Human Error
    • Error Classification and Reduction
    • Error Prediction Tools/Methods
    • Hierarchical Task Analysis (HTA)
    • SHERPA
    • Measuring Human Error
    • Workload and Fatigue
    • Crew Resource Management
    • Decision Making
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Discuss some of the factors affecting human performance, leading to human error.
  • Appraise some of the techniques available to assess human performance and error.
  • Critique error classification and management approaches.
  • Apply at least one error prediction method.

Human-Computer Interaction in Aviation

Module Leader
  • Dr Wen-Chin Li
Aim

    This module will provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles involved in Human-Computer Interaction and system design in aviation. Human factors issues are associated with safety in flight operations. The inter-relationships between Human and Computer are complex and manifold. The contents relate to the Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) of EASA for Human Factors Certification and Consideration. The lectures are complemented by a series of workshops in which the delegates have an opportunity to practice the techniques described.

Syllabus
    • Human-Computer Interaction
    • Automation and Automation Surprise
    • Attention Allocation
    • Workshops for Flight Deck Design
    • Human Errors in Flight Operations
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Apply the principles of Human-Computer interaction which relate to pilot performance.
  • Evaluate the design of the cockpit design and understand pilot attention allocation pattern.
  • Application of Human Information Processing Theory (HIP) in aviation interaction design and evaluation.
  • Critically evaluate the problems and benefits of automation in flight operations.
  • Understand the processes and challenges of human factors certification.

Aviation Medicine

Module Leader
  • Greaves, Dr Matthew M.J.
Aim

    This module aims to provide students with a background to human physiology, anatomy and biology relevant to occupational health, and to provide an understanding of occupational health service provision, including the role and liability of the workplace manager. The module will provide students with a background in human physiology and anatomy relevant to the study of human factors, focusing on general occupational health, and will then  focus on issues specific to occupational health and medicine in aviation.

Syllabus
    • Occupational Health and Human Physiology
    • Human Anatomy and Physiology (relevant to human factors, including respiratory and circulatory systems, sympathetic & parasympathetic nervous system and biomechanics)
    • Occupational Health and Illness (functions and limitations of occupational health services, management and legal aspects of occupational health)
    • The Atmosphere and the High Altitude Environment, including Radiation
    • The Hypobaric Environment, Hypoxia and Decompression
    • Effects of Acceleration
    • Limitations of the Sensory System
    • Health and Pathology in the Aviation Environment
    • Regulatory Aspects
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Appreciate basic human physiology and anatomy relevant to human factors 
  • Describe some of the common issues in occupational health
  • Explain the principles behind the management of the occupational health function, including legal/regulatory aspects.

Research Methods

Module Leader
  • Nixon, Dr Jim
Aim

    This module will introduce students to a range of qualitative and quantitative methods for application in human factors research. The module will assist students to prepare and conduct research for their Individual Research Project. 

Syllabus

    Collecting Data

    • Doing research (research ethics, the research story, the thesis, the hypothesis)
    • Introduction to experimental design - basic designs, maximising experimental variance, experimental control, and minimising error variance
    • Qualitative data analysis
    • Questionnaire design (content, phrasing, response formats and analysis)

    Analysing Quantitative Data

    • Exploring data (descriptive statistics, levels of measurement)
    • Examining differences (parametric and non-parametric statistical tests)
    • Examining relationships (bivariate correlation)
    • Introduction to modelling data
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will:

  • Be able to develop, plan and communicate research in a structured way.
  • Understand the importance of research ethics when using human participants.
  • Be able to develop effective questionnaires and subjective-rating scales to answer research questions.
  • Be able to appraise and select qualitative and quantitative research methods and apply methods to different research needs.
  • Be able to conduct of statistical analyses and interpret the results.

Safety Assessment of Aircraft Systems

Module Leader
  • Dr Simon Place
Aim

    To familiarise students with the various approaches to the problems of assessing the safety of increasingly complex aircraft systems.

Syllabus
    • Requirements for safety assessment as part of regulatory approval and continued airworthiness process
    • Development of requirements for safety assessment, FAR and EASA CS25-1309
    • Introduction to probability methods and safety analysis techniques
    • Common mode failures
    • Fault tree analysis, dependence diagrams and Boolean algebra for quantification of system reliability
    • Reliability analysis using Weibull distribution
    • Zonal safety analysis (ZSA) and Particular Risk Analysis (PRA)
    • Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA)
    • Typical safety assessment for a stall warning and identification system
    • Certification maintenance requirements
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Explain the theory behind each technique for safety assessment, including the strengths and weaknesses of each one
  • Evaluate and apply the technique(s) which is most appropriate for the system under consideration
  • Differentiate between the various stages of safety assessment in the development of an aircraft or system
  • Illustrate the issues to be faced in the certification of new systems and aircraft.

Aviation Safety Management

Module Leader
Aim

    To provide an advanced understanding of the core concepts underlying aviation safety and how safety management systems are implemented.

Syllabus
    • Safety Management Philosophy and Implementation
    • Safety Leadership and Culture
    • Business Case for Safety Investigation
    • Hazard Identification and Risk Management
    • Flight Data Monitoring and Safety Data Management
    • Safety Controls: Market, Regulation and Fault Systems
    • Change Management
    • Safety Reporting, Analysis and Investigation
    • Crisis Management
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the fundamental concepts behind Safety Management Systems (SMS), as defined by ICAO and other parties
  • Select and implement techniques for the identification, quantification and management of hazards and risks
  • Critically assess strategies for developing and enhancing safety culture including the role of leadership, structure and reporting systems
  • Critically assess the ways in which safety is measured and managed in airport, airline and other aviation operations
  • Collaborate and contribute effectively to the crisis management exercise and other group workshops, appreciating the contributions made by other team member.

Aircraft Accident Investigation and Response

Module Leader
  • Dr Wen-Chin Li
Aim

    The process of accident investigation will be considered as a whole from notification and disaster response through evidence collection and analysis to the preparation of a final report and recommendations for change. Different approaches will be considered including ‘no-blame’, criminal and coronial investigations with particular emphasis on the role that human factors practitioners can play in the investigation and in dealing with the consequences of an accident and its associated recommendations.

Syllabus
    • Accident investigation approaches and response
    • Investigation as it relates to safety management systems
    • Disaster response/emergency planning
    • On site appraisal and preservation of evidence
    • Working with interested parties
    • Operations/systems/engineering investigations
    • Design and crashworthiness
    • Human factors in flight operations
    • Witnesses and interviewing
    • Analytical methods
    • Cross-cultural issues in accident investigation
    • Preparing and managing recommendations
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the accident investigation process as used in a number of industries
  • Identify roles and responsibilities within the accident investigation process
  • Critically assess analysis techniques used in accident investigation
  • List common causal factors and their frequencies
  • Apply human factors knowledge and skills to the investigation of incidents and accidents.

Applied Safety Assessment (Group Project)

Module Leader
  • Dr Simon Place
Aim

    This module will provide students with an opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills learned in the Safety Assessment of Aircraft Systems module, in a practical scenario. Also, the module aims to equip students with the ability to conduct a comprehensive safety assessment on an airframe whist working in a team, and to present the group work both orally and in a written report.

Syllabus
    • Functional Hazard Assessment (FHA): The FHA exercise will identify the critical failure conditions of the system. Each group will classify the failure conditions in accord with the 25.1309 categories and identify the analysis techniques most appropriate to each.
    • Particular Risks: The Particular Risks appropriate to the system and its installation will also be considered as appropriate.
    • Enhanced Fault Tree Analysis (EFTA): In groups the students will carry out an Enhanced Fault Tree Analysis for the failure conditions identified by the FHA as being appropriate to this analytical technique.
    • Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA): This exercise will use existing system drawings in order to perform FMEA on the aircraft system.
    • Zonal Safety Analysis: Students will carry out a Zonal Safety Analysis on the aircraft zones in which the system is installed.
Intended learning outcomes

On completion of the of the module, you will be able to:

  • Explain the application of the main techniques for safety assessment.
  • Critically evaluate the functions of an aircraft system from a safety perspective and select the most appropriate analytical technique.
  • Conduct a variety of System Safety Assessment analysis methods in an applied context.
  • Plan the different aspects of a System Safety Assessment, allocating team tasks and resources as appropriate.

Capstone (Group Project)

Module Leader
Aim
    This module will provide a simulated industrial environment where knowledge and skills gained from the taught components of the course can be applied to solving a human factors and safety problem.
Syllabus
    • Introduction to the project
    • Student-led planning and management of the project
    • Student-led deliver of written and oral reporting of the findings.

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
  • Collect information from a variety of sources (for example electronic, subject-matter experts to support a group research project
  • Appraise and critique the work of other practitioners and specialists
  • Plan, manage and complete work to a deadline within a team environment
  • Appreciate the contributions of other team members
  • Collaborate with other team members to produce a group report within a set deadline
  • Contribute effectively to a group presentation and competently defend the findings of the project.

Optional 

Flight Data Monitoring

Module Leader
Aim

    This module will provide an understanding of Flight Data Monitoring within a commercial organisation and to detail the uses, processes and responsibilities of a successful FDM programme.

Syllabus
    • The history of FDM and an overview of its objectives
    • CAP739, EASA and ICAO regulatory frameworks
    • Integration of FDM within a safety system
    • FDM technology
    • Setting analysis targets
    • Data recovery and analysis tools
    • Principles of data validation and assessment
    • Trace interpretation, with both theoretical and practical sessions
    • Database management
    • The use of statistics in data analysis
    • Animations and visualisation in data presentation
    • FDM in accident and incident investigation
    • The interface between the analyst and crews
    • Legal aspects of FDM data collection, retention and use
    • The use of FDM to justify operational and technical change
    • The potential of FDM within maintenance programmes.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the key elements of an FDM programme and appraise the security and anonymity safeguards of a given FDM programme.
  • Critically analyse an FDM event, including evaluating data integrity and present the analysis in an appropriate format.
  • Propose and defend an FDM regime for application in their own company.

Training and Simulation

Module Leader
  • Dr Wen-Chin Li
Aim

    To provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for the design and evaluation of training from an applied and theoretical perspective, including analysis of training needs, identifying the structure of training contents, and developing the methods of evaluation required to investigate training effectiveness. Also, the module aims to equip students with the ability to understand the role of simulation in the work setting, especially as it relates to training and simulation in aviation domain.

Syllabus
    • An introduction to training - including its definitions and history.
    • Systems approaches to training - a description of the systems approach to training and its practical limitations.
    • Training needs analysis - an introduction to training needs analysis.
    • Training design - introduction to training content and structure; theories of training instruction, training instruction and delivery; trainee characteristics.
    • Simulation in the work context - an introduction to simulation as a training tool; types of simulators and fidelity issues; validating simulators and simulation, human factors integration.
    • The future development of simulation - current state of the art in a changing world of work; a glimpse into the future and virtual reality.
    • Transfer of training - theoretical approaches and transfer enhancing factors; models and methods of evaluating training effectiveness, evaluating simulator effectiveness.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Develop the skills and knowledge related to training and simulation.
  • Explain the principles of Training design and evaluate effectiveness of training.
  • Utilise simulation tool for improving training.
  • Integrate Human Factors concepts in the Training and Simulation domain.

Human Factors in Aviation Maintenance

Module Leader
  • Rashid, Dr Hamad H.S.J.
Aim

    The module aims to provide a broad overview of the nature and management of human error in the aviation maintenance domain. Key theories and frameworks for investigating maintenance human error, contributing factors and effects on operations are introduced. The challenges associated with practical application of currently available safety tools are examined together with the latest strategies to enhance understanding and management of maintenance error. This module does not require previous background in aviation maintenance and engineering.

Syllabus
    • The nature of the maintenance environment: An overall appreciation of the general environment in which humans operate when carrying out maintenance. This includes both civil and military environments.
    • Maintenance management: Organisation, line and base maintenance, planning, maintenance control, error management systems, shift handover, blame cycle, communication in the workplace, workplace environment, work/job design.
    • Regulatory framework: Legal requirements. EASA/Part 145 Maintenance Human factors.
    • Designing for human factors: What can be done by the designer to reduce and mitigate human error. Design philosophies and human-centred design.
    • Human error management in maintenance: The benefits and challenges associated with the use and application of reporting systems and safety tools such as Boeing’s Maintenance Error Decision Aid (MEDA) and Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS). Emerging methods and research to enhance understanding and prediction of maintenance error.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, you will be able to:

  • Describe the regulatory background and the environment within which aviation maintenance takes place.
  • Evaluate current methods for maintenance error management (reactive, proactive and predictive).
  • Appraise the links between aircraft maintenance and safety.
  • Analyse ways in which maintenance errors can be reduced at the design stage.

Work and Job Design

Module Leader
  • Charles, Dr Rebecca L
Aim
    This module aims to provide an understanding of the challenges faced when evaluating or designing new jobs or tasks for individuals and teams specifically within an aviation context, where safety is a key concern. Consideration will be given to designing effective jobs for both teams and individuals and what this means on an organisational level as well as a personal one. Effective job design requires physical, and cognitive factors to be considered, and students will gain an understanding of how environmental and workspace layout can influence individual and team capabilities and performance. By learning techniques, methodologies and theories surrounding job design, students will be able to apply these to existing, or new job designs and learn how to communicate particular needs to HR or Job Analysts. Attention will also be paid to the particular challenge of introducing new technology to existing jobs, and how this can be tackled using a practical, human factors based approach.
Syllabus
    • ‘Work’ and ‘worker’ Job design and characteristics
    • Physical and environmental ergonomics
    • Individual performance and attitudes
    • Team performance measurement / prediction
    • Standards and legal considerations
    • HF requirements capture and the use of SMEs.
Intended learning outcomes
  • Identify the elements of an ‘effective job’ and apply methods to measure it, considering physical and cognitive factors
  • Apply individual and team assessment tools and strategies to existing jobs in order to evaluate or improve at an individual, team, and organisational level
  • Choose appropriate analysis and capture methods to design new jobs or re-design existing ones
  • Evaluate and predict how changes such as the introduction of new technology will impact current working practices.

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year and the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.

MSc Full-time £9,000
MSc Part-time £21,000 *
PgCert Part-time £8,000 *
  • * Students will be offered the option of paying the full fee up front, or in a maximum of two payments per year; first instalment on receipt of invoice and the second instalment six months later.  

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2017 and 31 July 2018.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.

MSc Full-time £18,500
MSc Part-time £21,000 *
PgCert Part-time £8,000 *
  • * Students will be offered the option of paying the full fee up front, or in a maximum of two payments per year; first instalment on receipt of invoice and the second instalment six months later.  

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2017 and 31 July 2018.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.

Funding Opportunities

To help students find and secure appropriate funding, we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England
A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Santander MSc Scholarship
The Santander Scholarship at Cranfield University is worth £5,000 towards tuition fees for full-time master's courses. Check the scholarship page to find out if you are from an eligible Santander Universities programme country.

Chevening Scholarships
Chevening Scholarships are awarded to outstanding emerging leaders to pursue a one-year master’s at Cranfield university. The scholarship includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS)
The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Commonwealth Scholarships for Developing Countries
Students from developing countries who would not otherwise be able to study in the UK can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship which includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Future Finance Student Loans
Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Erasmus+ Student Loans
This new loan scheme for EU students is offered by Future Finance and European Investment Fund and provides smart, flexible loans of up to £9,300.

ISTAT Foundation Scholarships
The ISTAT Foundation is actively engaged in helping young people develop careers in aviation by offering scholarships of up to $US10,000. One student will be nominated for a scholarship each year by Cranfield University.

Entry requirements

A first or second class UK Honours degree or equivalent in engineering, aeronautical engineering, mathematics, ergonomics, psychology or other science. Other qualifications (e.g. HND or alternative) may be acceptable, provided that there is evidence of sufficient relevant work experience.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. Our minimum requirements are as follows:

IELTS Academic – 6.5 overall
TOEFL – 92
Pearson PTE Academic – 65
Cambridge English Scale – 180
Cambridge English: Advanced - C
Cambridge English: Proficiency – C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Applicants who do not already meet the English language entry requirement for their chosen Cranfield course can apply to attend one of our Presessional English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses. We offer Winter/Spring and Summer programmes each year to offer holders.


Your career

There are strong employment prospects for graduates in safety-related management and operational positions. Course graduates generally find suitable employment in a range of safety and human factors related roles. Previous graduates of the course have been successful in gaining employment with:

  • Airbus
  • BAE Systems
  • British Airways
  • Qinetiq
  • Virgin Atlantic
  • NATS
  • Honeywell
  • Easyjet
  • DHL
  • Royal Navy
  • Frazer-Nash
  • MBDA.

Applying

Online application form. UK students are normally expected to attend an interview and financial support is best discussed at this time. Overseas and EU students may be interviewed by telephone.

Apply Now