With a projected demand for 27,000 new civil airliners by 2030, the industry faces a shortfall in postgraduate level engineers to meet future industry needs. Aircraft engineers need a combination of technical and business skills for today's aerospace engineering projects. This course will broaden your understanding of aircraft engineering and design subjects and provide you with a strong foundation for career development in technical, integration and leadership roles.

Overview

  • Start dateFebruary
  • DurationMSc: three years part-time. PgDip: two years part-time, PgCert: two years part-time
  • DeliveryTaught modules 40%, Group project 30%, Individual research project 30%
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typePart-time
  • CampusCranfield campus

Who is it for?

We recognise the challenge of undertaking part-time study while you are working. This course is specifically designed for people working in engineering or technical management positions in the aerospace industry who wish to study for an accredited master's degree while they are in employment.

You are required to attend a total of nine weeks of lectures over three years on a modular basis. The first year attendance pattern is two weeks in February, followed by one week in June and one week in November. Following a series of compulsory modules, you may choose three specialist optional modules in order to tailor the course to your particular interests and requirements.

Why this course?

This course provides accelerated development of engineering staff whilst delivering the right mix of technical and business skills for careers in the aerospace industry. The course will broaden your understanding of aircraft engineering and design subjects, and provide a strong foundation for career development in technical, integration and leadership roles. This accredited master's course supports your career development by meeting the further learning requirements for Chartered Engineer status. The Group project allows you to gain hands on experience of development and design lifecycle, and the Individual project allows you to investigate a topic that is of interest to your employer, with supervision from experienced staff.

Cranfield has been at the forefront of postgraduate education in aircraft engineering since 1946. We have a global reputation for our advanced postgraduate education and extensive applied research. You can be sure that your qualification will be valued and respected by employers.

Informed by Industry

The Industrial Advisory Panel, comprised of senior industry professionals, provides input into the curriculum in order to improve the employment prospects of our graduates. Panel members include:

  • Airbus UK - Filton
  • BAE Systems
  • Canadian High Commission
  • Department for Business, Enterprise and Regulatory Reform
  • Marshall Aerospace
  • Messier-Bugatti-Dowty
  • RAF
  • Military Aviation Authority.

Your teaching team

You will be taught by experienced Cranfield academic staff, many of whom have industrial experience including:

The course also includes visiting lecturers from industry who will relate the theory to current best practice. Past speakers include:

  • Head of Worldwide Suppliers, Airbus
  • Head of Engineering Capability, BAE Systems
  • Chief of Manufacturing Engineering Processes and Capability, BAE Systems.

Accreditation

The MSc in Aircraft Engineering will meet, in part, the exemplifying academic benchmark requirements for registration as a Chartered Engineer. Accredited MSc graduates who also have a BEng (Hons) accredited for CEng will be able to show that they have satisfied the educational base for CEng registration.

Course details

The MSc in Aircraft Engineering consists of three elements: taught modules, a group design project and an individual research project.

Group project

The group project is undertaken throughout year two of your studies and provides a wealth of learning opportunities. You will work together on a significant design project, progressing from concept to hardware. Each student takes on a technical design role related to a major structural, systems or avionics item as well as a management role such as Chief Engineer, Project Manager, Finance Manager, etc.

Recent Group Projects have covered:

  • Turbo-jet powered unmanned air vehicles
  • An advanced aircraft systems and avionics integration rig
  • An electric ultralight aircraft
  • The development of a hand controller for pilots with lower limb disability

Individual project

The individual research project allows you to delve deeper into an area of specific interest of your choice, and you are encouraged to select a project that is of relevance to your sponsoring company. You will complete the individual project during year three of your studies. 

Recent individual research projects have included:

  • Study into the effect of environmental conditioning on the pull-through performance of countersunk bolted joints in thin composite structures
  • The effect of alternative fuels on military aircraft fuel systems
  • Conceptual design of a UAV with STOL capability for operation in remote, unpaved surfaces
  • Development of a MATLAB linear model of the NIMROD pitch flight control system
  • An industrial study of multi-disciplinary optimisation.

Assessment

Taught modules 40%, Group project 30%, Individual research project 30%

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory modules and (where applicable) some elective modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Tools for Integrated Product Development

Aim

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the major issues faced in product development today, and show them how new technologies can be implemented to help overcome those problems. The module will focus primarily on Computer Aided Design but will also discuss Digital Mockup and Computer Aided Manufacture.

Syllabus
    • Module introduction: introduction to integrated product development and the computer based tools used to support IPD
    • Product development using integrated computer aided design
    • Computer Aided Design principles
    • Hands on CAD workshops
    • Computer aided engineering tools: computer aided manufacture, rapid prototyping and digital product assembly
    • Industrial Case Study 1: Computer Aided Design
    • Industrial Case Study 2: digital mockup
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this study the student should:

  • Have a critical awareness of recent changes in the product development process that have been facilitated by computer based design tools
  • Be able to differentiate between and evaluate the functions of different tools used in the product development process including Computer Aided Design, Computer Aided Manufacture, Computer Aided Engineering
  • Have an understanding of the issues associated with managing CAD data including integrating and interfacing incompatible systems
  • Have acquired the skills required to construct simple CAD models using parametric solid modelling and surface modelling in CATIA v5
  • Be able to apply the knowledge they have gained to a novel aircraft design in a collaborative group design project.

Major Component Design and Manufacture

Aim

    The aim of this module is to explain the reasons behind the design choices to be made in the structural layout and manufacture of components such as wings and fuselages.

Syllabus

    Component Design

    • Wing design and manufacture
    • Fuselage design and manufacture
    • Undercarriage: shock absorbers and leg geometry, detail considerations
    • Flaps and control surfaces: structural configuration and mechanisms

    Structural requirements

    • Strength, stiffness and serviceability
    • Analysis of requirements, sources of load and reference datum lines
    • Role of structural members: mainplane, stabilisers, auxiliary surfaces
    • Departures from elementary theories: constraint effects, cutouts, buckling
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Define the constraints imposed on aircraft design by manufacturing and operational considerations.
2. Review the influence of design for manufacture on the design of both structure and aircraft systems.
3. Evaluate the range of design solutions for aircraft component design.
4. Apply their acquired knowledge to an aircraft design problem

Introduction and Initial Aerospace Vehicle Design

Aim
    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the process of aircraft conceptual design. Additionally, this module will provide an introduction to the campus academic facilities and develop team working and communication skills.
Syllabus
    Team working and communication
    In addition to familiarising the students with the design process the module is designed to encourage them to work together effectively as a team and to develop communication skills that will be further utilised throughout the MSc course in the GDP.
    Introduction to Aircraft Design
    • The design and development process
    • Importance of requirements and mass
    • Reliability and Maintainability
    Aircraft Conceptual Design
    • Project design process and parametric techniques
    • Flight path performance
    • Drag and weight prediction: Drag sources, polar estimation, weight prediction methods
    • Layout aspects: wing; powerplant; landing gear; fuselage
    • Overview of stability and control: tailplane/elevator, fin/rudder, aileron layout
    • Overall project synthesis
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Have a broad understanding of the multidisciplinary nature of aircraft design and manufacture.
2. Be able to apply conceptual design methods to simple aircraft design problems.
3. Have developed transferable skills in team building, networking (including intersite communication) and independent learning.

Elective modules
A selection of modules from the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Finite Element Analysis

Module Leader
  • Dr Ioannis Giannopoulos
Aim

    The course is aimed at giving potential Finite Element USERS basic understanding of the inner workings of the method.

    The objective is to introduce users to the terminology, basic numerical and mathematical aspects of the method. This should help students to avoid some of the more common and important user errors, many of which stem from a "black box" approach to this technique. Some basic guidelines are also given on how to approach the modelling of structures using the Finite Element Method.


Syllabus
    • Background to Finite Element Methods (FEM) and its application
    • Introduction to FE modelling: Idealisation, Discretisation, Meshing and Post Processing
    • Tracking and controlling errors in a finite element analysis. ‘Do’s and don’ts’ of modelling.
    • Illustration of basics of FEM using the Direct Stiffness method to define both terminology and theoretical approach.
    • Problems of large systems of equations for FE, and solution methods.
    • FE method for continua illustrated with membrane and shell elements.
    • Nonlinear analysis in FEM and examples
    • NASTRAN application sessions

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Understand the underlying principles and key aspects of practical application of FEA to structural problems.
2. Understand the main mathematical and numerical aspects of the element formulations for 1D, 2D and 3D elements.
3. Build and analyse finite element models based on structural and continuum elements with proper understanding of limitations of the FEM.
4. Interpret results of the analyses and assess error levels.
5. Critically evaluate the constraints and implications imposed by the finite element method.
6. Extend their knowledge and skills to the FE analysis of more complex structures on their thesis work.

Fatigue, Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance

Aim
    • To provide an understanding of the theories of Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics and Damage Tolerance and to show how those concepts are applied to the design and testing of aircraft structures and Airworthiness Certification. 
    • To provide basic principles on damage tolerance design philosophies and regulatory rules.
Syllabus
    • Design awareness: philosophies of design against fatigue: i.e. safe-life, fail-safe and damage tolerance.
    • Fatigue analysis: the traditional S-N curve approach: calculation of crack initiation life; mean stress effect, notch effect, and other influential factors; Palmgren-Miner's cumulative damage rule and fatigue analysis under variable amplitude loadings.
    • Aircraft fatigue loads: atmospheric turbulence, manoeuvre, landing and ground loads; determination of cumulative frequency load distribution; typical aircraft load spectra which have been developed for use in the laboratory and computer simulation.
    • Fracture Mechanics: basic theory of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM): concepts of Stress Intensity Factor, fracture toughness, energy release rate; plane stress and plane strain, plastic zone at the crack tip; calculation of residual strength for a component containing cracks; prediction of fatigue crack growth using the Paris law and Forman's formula. Effect of variable amplitude loads.
    • Damage Tolerance: damage tolerant design methods. Fatigue monitoring in flight/service. Inspection methods CAA and FAA Regulations and their relationship to Airworthiness Certification. Composites vs. metallic.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this study the student should:

  • Understand the importance of design against fatigue, especially for the aircraft structures; understand the concept of the damage tolerance design and fail-safe design
  • Command the basic knowledge of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics; know how to use the theory of LEFM to estimate residual strength and crack propagation life of a structure
  • Understand why metals break; demonstrate understanding of the various forms of material deformation and failure in metallic and composite structural components and composites to form a sound base for the skills required for fatigue analysis using both crack initiation and crack propagation approaches
  • Be able to select the most appropriate method and use fatigue data sheets for an engineering application
  • Have knowledge of regulatory authority requirements for airworthiness and damage tolerance.

Aircraft Loading Actions and Aeroelasticity

Module Leader
  • Professor Shijun Guo
Aim

    This module is separated into two ten hour blocks. The aim of the first ten hours is to describe all the main loading cases, including those encountered on the ground, in the air and those induced by the environment. In addition, the student is introduced to the history and significance of the various airworthiness requirements. The aim of the second ten hour block is to introduce students to the concept of aeroelasticity, develop the importance of aeroelastic phenomena as applied to aircraft design and to provide students with methods of analysis and criteria.

Syllabus

    Standard requirements, their application, interpretation and limitations

    Flight loading cases

    • Symmetric manoeuvres, pitching acceleration, gust effects, asymmetric manoeuvres, roll and yaw

    Structural design data

    • The effect of inertia on relief shear force, bending moment and torque diagrams

    Factors

    • Load factors, their basis and restrictions, repeated and random loads

    Aeroelasticity

    • Importance of aeroelastic phenomena
    • Aeroelastic requirements in aircraft design
    • Basics of static aeroelasticity: divergence, control efficiency and reversal
    • Unsteady aerodynamic loads on oscillating airfoils
    • Characteristics of flutter and important design parameters and criteria
    • Aeroelastic analysis and optimisation techniques
    • Gust response of rigid and flexible airframes and analysis techniques
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this study the student should:

  • Have an understanding of the origin of the design loads acting on a structural component
  • Have a critical understanding of the salient terminology, mathematics and methodologies employed in aeroelasticity
  • Have an understanding of the aeroelastic phenomena and criteria in aircraft design
  • Have an understanding of the fundamental theory and analytical methods and be able to apply them to analysing basic.

Detail Stressing

Module Leader
  • Dr Ioannis Giannopoulos
Aim
    To introduce students to the techniques of detail stressing as practised in the aerospace industry.
Syllabus
    • The structural function of aircraft components. Definition of Limit, Proof and Ultimate loads and Factors for Civil and Military aircraft
    • Basic formulas for stress analysis. Stress strain curves for metallic materials. Material equivalents. Concept of Reserve Factors (RF) and Margins of Safety (MS)
    • Material data. Design guidelines for mechanically fastened joints. Lugs. Strength of bolted/riveted joints. Usage of approved aerospace components
    • Structures under bending and compression. Euler buckling, flange buckling, inter-rivet buckling. Buckling of struts and plates. Shear buckling of webs
    • Generalized stress strain curves
    • Plastic bending and form factors
    • Rivet and bolt group analysis
    • Analysis of thin walled structures
    • Preparation of a detailed Stressing Report and Reserve Factor summary tables for a classroom exercise to be completed during this module.

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
  • Apply the principals and techniques in stress analysis and airworthiness requirements to size basic aircraft structural components
  • Evaluate the strength of a component and determine its ability to support an applied load
  • Compare, propose and select metallic materials suitable for use in aircraft structures
  • Acquire transferable skills to allow effective communication with company stress engineers.

Airframe Systems

Aim
    To expand the students’ knowledge of airframe systems, their role, design and integration. In particular, to provide students with an appreciation of the considerations necessary when selecting aircraft power systems and the effect of systems on the aircraft as a whole.
Syllabus
    • Introduction to Airframe Systems
    • Systems Design Philosophy and Safety
    • Aircraft Secondary Power Systems
    • Aircraft Pneumatics Power Systems
    • Aircraft Hydraulics Power Systems
    • Aircraft Electrical Power Systems
    • Aircraft Emergency Systems
    • Flight Control Power Systems
    • Aircraft Environmental Control
    • Aircraft Icing and Ice Protection Systems
    • Aviation Fuels and Aircraft Fuel Systems
    • Engine Off-Take Effects
    • Fuel Penalties of Systems
    • Ageing of Aircraft Systems
    • Advanced and Possible Future Airframe Systems.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Identify the main airframe systems in civil and military aircraft and explain their purposes and principles of operation
Cite the sources of systems power and their architecture, generation and distribution methods
Discuss the requirements for; identify types of equipment and systems used for; and perform basic analysis of environmental control and oxygen systems in aircraft
Cite the problems resulting from icing on aircraft and systems available to provide protection
Identify the major considerations to be made in the design of aircraft fuel systems and the major components and sub-systems, including aviation fuels
Design the major airframe systems to a conceptual level by producing top level systems schematic diagrams
Appraise the effects of airframe systems power provision on aircraft power plants
Analyse fuel penalties resulting from a given system’s presence on an aircraft by carrying out basic calculations
Recognise the reasons for, and possible types of changes, that may occur in airframe systems in the near future.

Introduction to Aircraft Structural Crashworthiness

Aim
    The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the design of crashworthy aircraft structures and the considerations necessary when designing safe and crashworthy aircraft. The main purpose of crashworthy design is to eliminate injuries and fatalities in mild impacts and minimise them in severe but survivable impacts.
Syllabus
    Overview of Aircraft Crashworthiness
    • Objectives and Approach
    • Regulations
    • Human Tolerance
    Crash Energy Management
    • Structural Collapse
    • Collapse of metallic and composite structural components
    • Component collapse vs. structural collapse
    Introduction to methods for crash analysis
    • Hand calculations
    • Hybrid analysis methods
    • Detailed analysis methods
    Role and capability of testing and simulation in the crashworthiness field
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Outline the main priorities and fundamentals of crashworthiness in aircraft in the context of protection in crash events
  • Define the requirements for structural components used for impact energy absorption and structural collapse in aircraft
  • Describe crashworthiness requirements on major equipment and systems
  • Identify relevant regulations for aircraft crashworthy design
  • Discuss human tolerance in the context of crashworthiness
  • Identify the main experimental and analytical techniques used in design for crashworthiness
  • Apply the systems approach in impact energy management to aircraft design
  • Use simple approximate calculations on the performance of energy absorption components and structures to assess the crashworthiness of an aircraft structure.


Design, Durability and Integrity of Composite Aircraft Structures

Module Leader
  • Professor Philip Irving
Aim

    The course seeks to provide engineers with knowledge of polymer composite properties and behaviour relevant to their in-service performance durability and maintenance in aircraft structures

Syllabus

    Basic principles
    Introduction to composite materials comparison of relevant mechanical and service properties to those of metals; manufacturing process and relation of process and constituents to service performance.

    Regulatory background

    Requirements for fatigue and damage tolerant design in civil and military aircraft as implemented for polymer composite structures. Requirements for rotorcraft and for large fixed wing aircraft.

    Structural analysis

    Brief summary of methods and techniques for stress analysis and aircraft design using polymer composite materials.

    Fatigue analysis

    In-plane fatigue and failure processes; stiffness and strength changes under fatigue loading; fatigue notch effects in polymer composite laminates; cycle counting techniques and variable amplitude loading in metallic and polymer composite materials; life assessment and calculation procedures for design against in-plane fatigue.

    Delamination crack growth and fracture mechanics

    Basic theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics; strain energy release rate; applications to delamination crack growth in polymer composite laminates; delamination crack growth testing under static and fatigue loading; laboratory testing to measure Mode I and Mode II interlaminar fracture toughness (GIC and GIIC); comparison with stress intensity approaches in metallic materials; calculation of delamination behaviour of small samples and of aircraft structures. Damage tolerance issues in composites.

    Service degradation processes

    Impact damage in polymer composite laminates
    Response of polymer composites to out-of-plane impact loading; laboratory testing, effects of velocity, mass and impacting body shape on damage produced; damage morphologies, barely visible impact damage (BVID) concepts; effects of laminate constituents on damage resistance; effects of in-plane loading on impact damage growth and laminate strength; compression and fatigue after impact; design against impact damage.

    Service environment issues

    Including response to temperature and humidity; bird strike; in- service damage detection in composite structures; repairs; operator experience with polymer composite aircraft structures. Structural test requirements to prove airworthiness.


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Describe the properties and manufacture techniques of polymer composite materials, and of the basic approaches to design with them.
2. Categorise the aircraft service degradation processes of polymer composite laminates involving fatigue, impact loading, temperature and humidity fluctuations.
3. Evaluate the effect aircraft service degradation processes have on strength and durability of the composite.
4. Undertake simple calculations of damage tolerance based on laboratory test data.
5. Formulate structural and coupon sample test requirements to demonstrate the adequacy of the static and fatigue strength and damage tolerance of a composite aircraft structure.
6. Critically appraise the design principles and relate them to structural safety considerations in the appropriate regulatory context, for both new designs and in- service aircraft.

Aircraft Performance for Aircraft Engineering

Aim
    The aim of this module is to provide an introduction to the performance and stability characteristics of a conventional aircraft by means of flight test.

    Please note that this is a 2 week module.
Syllabus
    Assessed elements:
    • Air data systems, Standard Atmosphere and pressure error measurement
    • Lift, drag and cruise performance

    Non-assessed elements:
    • Static equilibrium and trim
    • Longitudinal static stability, trim, pitching moment equation, static margins
    • Manoeuvrability: and manoeuvre margins
    • Lateral-directional trim and static stability
    • Introduction to dynamic stability

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Critically evaluate the lift, drag and cruise performance characteristics of a conventional aircraft.
2. Critically assess the pressure measurement system in the context of industry standard specifications.
3. Apply the principles of flight test to aircraft performance evaluation.

Flight Dynamics Principles for Aircraft Engineering

Aim
    To describe and demonstrate methods for the analysis of the linear dynamics, stability and control of aircraft and their interpretation in the context of flying qualities.
Syllabus
    • The Equations of Motion (10 lectures)
    • Development of the linearised equations for longitudinal symmetric motion and lateral directional asymmetric motion. Solution of the equations of motion:- aircraft response transfer functions and state space models. Aerodynamic modelling:- Aerodynamic stability and control derivatives, derivative estimation, modelling limitations. Stability: interpretation on the s-plane
    • Flight Dynamics (10 lectures)
    • Aircraft dynamics:- Stability modes, longitudinal dynamics, lateral-directional dynamics, reduced order models, time response. Flying and handling qualities:- Assessment, requirements, aircraft role, pilot opinion rating, flying qualities requirements on the s-plane
    • Flight control:- Introduction to stability augmentation, closed loop system analysis, the root locus plot, longitudinal stability augmentation, lateral-directional stability augmentation

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Derive and solve the small perturbation equations of motion for a conventional aircraft.
2. Assess the flying qualities of an aeroplane.
3. Recommend and design simple stability augmentation system strategies to rectify flying qualities deficiencies.

Methodologies for Integrated Product Development

Aim

    This module aims to introduce several major topics associated with Engineering Integration in the context of what has been known in recent years as Integrated Product Development (IPD) in the Extended/Virtual Enterprise. The objective is to follow the process from the early stages of the product development lifecycle when the Prime has to deal with vague or difficult to quantify customer needs and to convert those to sound (functional) requirements and subsequently to design embodiments. The emphasis is on the architectural design enabling methods, but tools and technologies are also discussed.

Syllabus
    Introduction 
    Overview of the topics covered in the module. Included also are brief introductions to Quality Function Deployment (QFD) and Design Space Exploration, Optimisation and Trade-off Analysis.

    Object Oriented Approach to Systems Modelling  
    This lecture covers the fundamental concepts, including also a very brief introduction to the Unified Modelling Language (UML) and the Systems Modelling Language (SysML). The lecture is essential since software and systems engineering play an increasing role in aerospace product development.

    Engineering Integration and Architectural Design
    Covered are the principles of the semi-formal Axiomatic Design approach. Useful for both engineering architecture and software design. Included also is an exercise.

    System Life Cycle Processes
    Covers established standards for the engineering of systems such as ANSI/EIA 632 and ISO/IEC 15288.

    Information and Knowledge Sharing
    Covers the principles of information sharing and standards such as STEP (Standard for the exchange of product model data) and its modelling language EXPRESS.

    Systems Modelling 
    Covers the basics of the Systems Modeling Language (SysML) – a de facto standard, general-purpose modelling language for systems engineering applications. A hands on exercise is included.

    BAE Systems Case Studies
    Customer and Market Needs Definition- Mapping to Requirements, integrated design, modelling and simulation (Synthetic Environments), engineering integration, managing by maturity, integrated product teams and organisation.

    Product Lifecycle Management (PLM)
    This lecture covers state of the art in PLM including also the need for information management in integrated product development, key elements of Product Data Management (PDM), standards, integration and implementation issues.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Apply axiomatic design principles to a simple architectural design problem.
2. Use the object oriented approach to model a simple design or system and draw an object model diagram to describe the system.
3. Demonstrate a critical understanding of the concepts of systems information processes and information and knowledge sharing in engineering design.
4. Describe the key elements of a PLM system and understand PLM implementation challenges.

Manufacturing

Module Leader
  • Dr Konstantinos Salonitis
Aim

    The aim of the Manufacturing module is to provide students with a basic understanding of a broad range of issues associated with aircraft manufacture. The module will cover technical and management topics ranging from strategy and factory planning to composite manufacture.


Syllabus
    • Key manufacturing concepts and processes
    • Lean and cellular manufacturing principles
    • Modelling and simulation of manufacturing systems and use of factory physics
    • Manufacturing planning and control systems
    • Supply chain strategy
    • Through-life capability
    • Manufacturing cost engineering
    • Quality management
    • Composite Manufacture
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Have a critical awareness of manufacturing systems design, analysis and control that will enable them to contribute to the cost-effective manufacture of aircraft.
2. Have a comprehensive understanding of the interrelationships between design, manufacturing, supply chain and customer facing disciplines and how these can contribute to meeting the challenges of aircraft manufacture.
3. Be able to assess the implications for design and production of the use of composites.
4. Be able to apply their acquired knowledge to contribute effectively to Integrated Product Teams representing or taking into account the manufacturing issues related to aerospace product realisation.

Introduction to Avionics

Aim

    To provide a comprehensive overview of avionics systems and infrastructures.

Syllabus
    • Introduction to avionics systems.
    • Airborne sensor systems.
    • Navigation and communications systems – terrestrial and satellite-based systems, autonomous navigation systems, digital data links.
    • Radar – principle of operation, operational modes, radar cross section.
    • Displays – head down, head up and helmet mounted displays.
    • Avionics systems architectures and integration, databases.
    • Flight management and situational awareness systems, air traffic management.
    • Military applications – electronic warfare and countermeasures.
    • Product design considerations – design standards, fault tolerance and product life cycle.
    • Case study – a complete avionics installation.

    This module has an additional tutorial inside the cockpit of the large aircraft flight simulator. Students will be able to appreciate the cockpit layout design, understand information displayed to the pilot, and have the opportunity of flying the simulator. This tutorial is intended to enhance the learning process and the knowledge gained.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles of operation, basic functions and properties of avionics systems.
2. Identify the design and development strategies of avionics systems.
3. Be capable of developing avionics installation requirements in aircraft.

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.


MSc Part-time £21,000 *
PgDip Part-time £17,200 *
PgCert Part-time £10,350 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A non-refundable deposit is payable on offer acceptances and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.  Home/EU Students will pay a £500 deposit.  Overseas Students will pay a £1,000 deposit.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

MSc Part-time £22,500 *
PgDip Part-time £17,200 *
PgCert Part-time £10,350 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A non-refundable deposit is payable on offer acceptances and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.  Home/EU Students will pay a £500 deposit.  Overseas Students will pay a £1,000 deposit.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

Funding Opportunities

The majority of students are sponsored by their employer. A limited number of bursaries are available - please contact us for further information.

To help students find and secure appropriate funding, we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs.

Visit the funding finder.

ISTAT Foundation Scholarships
The ISTAT Foundation is actively engaged in helping young people develop careers in aviation by offering scholarships of up to $US10,000. One student will be nominated for a scholarship each year by Cranfield University.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England
A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Santander MSc Scholarship
The Santander Scholarship at Cranfield University is worth £5,000 towards tuition fees for full-time master's courses. Check the scholarship page to find out if you are from an eligible Santander Universities programme country.

Chevening Scholarships
Chevening Scholarships are awarded to outstanding emerging leaders to pursue a one-year master’s at Cranfield university. The scholarship includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS)
The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Commonwealth Scholarships for Developing Countries
Students from developing countries who would not otherwise be able to study in the UK can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship which includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Future Finance Student Loans
Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.


Entry requirements

A first or second class UK honours degree, or equivalent, in an engineering discipline. We also invite applications from professionals with HNC/HND qualifications if supported by substantial work experience.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. Our minimum requirements are as follows:

IELTS Academic – 6.5 overall
TOEFL – 92
Pearson PTE Academic – 65
Cambridge English Scale – 180
Cambridge English: Advanced – C
Cambridge English: Proficiency – C

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Applicants who do not already meet the English language entry requirement for their chosen Cranfield course can apply to attend one of our Presessional English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses. We offer Winter/Spring and Summer programmes each year to offer holders.

Your career

This course will provide you with the tools and experience to help enhance your career opportunities in the aerospace industry, enabling you to progress further in your present discipline, or move into other specialist or integration roles. Networking with students from different backgrounds is valuable to gain an appreciation of how other companies work.

This course can be used for Chartered Engineer status, which can result in new career opportunities for the future.

How to apply

Online application form. UK students are normally expected to attend an interview and financial support is best discussed at this time. Overseas and EU students may be interviewed by telephone.