This part-time course meets the requirements of the Level 7 System Engineering Master's Apprenticeship Programme. Eligible organisations will be able to use up to £21,000 of their Apprenticeship Levy to cover the cost of the course tuition fees. View Fees and Fundinginformation, or find out more about Master's Apprenticeships

Launching in January 2020, this brand new Systems Engineering MSc aims to prepare students for the professional practice of Systems Engineering roles in multi-disciplinary teams across a range of industries.

Overview

  • Start dateJanuary
  • DurationMSc: up to three years part-time; PgDip: up to two years part-time.
  • DeliveryCoursework, written examinations, oral examinations, portfolio and, for the MSc only, an individual thesis
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip
  • Study typePart-time
  • CampusCranfield campus

Who is it for?

  • Experienced and/or qualified engineers, scientists, managers or leaders wishing to broaden and deepen their skills or apply them in systems engineering or related roles.
  • Recent graduates wishing to extend their knowledge and skill within systems engineering professional roles.

Why this course?

The Centre for Systems Engineering has been at the forefront of developing systems engineering education for the past fifteen years, blending the breadth of systems thinking with the rigour of systems engineering and closely integrating this within acquisition management.

The course has been set up to enable students better understanding to focus content and delivery on systems engineering professionals working in distributed, agile teams using shared models and flexible working approaches, with an emphasis on professional skills such as leadership, team working, communication, data management and ethics.

Institute for Apprenticeships - Systems Engineering Degree

Course details

The course is modular and you will accumulate credits for each module you successfully complete - 10 credits per module. The thesis is worth 80 credits. 

The course structure has been devised to give the maximum amount of flexibility for you to create your own learning pathway whilst ensuring that the fundamental principles of systems engineering are compulsory. 

Course delivery

Coursework, written examinations, oral examinations, portfolio and, for the MSc only, an individual thesis

Individual project

The Individual Project provides you with an opportunity to undertake an in-depth study of an area of particular interest to you or your sponsor which is written up as a thesis or dissertation. The study might include, for example: 

  • Application of systems engineering tools and techniques to a real-world problem,
  • Analysis of underpinning systems engineering theory and practice,
  • Development of new or tailored systems engineering processes.

Modules

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory and elective (where applicable) modules which are currently affiliated with this course. All modules are indicative only, and may be subject to change for your year of entry.


Course modules

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Introduction to Systems and Systems Engineering

Aim
    As a foundation for the degree, an introduction into systems science, systems philosophy and systems thinking in specific relation to engineered systems. The module will provide the theoretical basis for the remainder of the degree.
Syllabus

    Unit 1: Systems Science

    • Overview of systems science, philosophy and systems theories.  Open system definitions and General Systems Theory, why and how can we apply systems ideas to a complex world, system complexity, emergence, viability, resilience, etc.

    • Systems Science workshop, exploration and evaluation of key systems science literature

    Unit 2: Systems Thinking

    • Overview of how system science ideas relate to real world problem and solution contexts.  Definitions of Engineered Systems, Product, Service and Enterprise Contexts and the relationship between Capability and Solution.

    • Systems Thinking workshop, explore a number of relevant systems thinking case studies

    Unit 3: SE Life Cycle

    • Overview of life cycle principles and standards, introduction to the principles of Model Based SE (MBSE), MBSE benefits, tools and implementation issues

    •  Life Cycle workshop, SE Life Cycle case studies

    Unit 4: Systems Modelling

    • Overview of modelling principles, the role dynamics and static models, overview of different kinds of hard and soft modelling method, introduction to multi method approaches

    •  Modelling workshop, introducing relevant notations including the Systems Modelling 


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Outline the nature of systems philosophy and its relationship to the engineering of systems throughout the lifecycle.
  • Apply a systems thinking approach to suitable areas of consideration.
  • Critically evaluate the role of models in the systems thinking and engineering approach.
  • Appraise current approaches to Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and the value of MBSE through the systems lifecycle.

Enterprise Management

Aim

    Successful integration and practice of systems engineering within a business environment requires a wider knowledge and understanding of the strategic management and business processes of the organisation and wider enterprise. Spanning a wide range of individual disciplines, enterprise management is used to ensure that all business activity is planned, managed and delivered to achieve strategic aims, objectives and goals.

     The interdisciplinary nature and wide-ranging applicability of systems engineering means there are inevitable touch points and integration requirements to ensure the enterprise can continue to deliver and meet its overarching goals and requirements.

     This module critically examines the relevance of underpinning theories and practice across the enterprise management domain from a systems engineering perspective. Taking a capability- and effects-based context, it aims to provide the systems engineer with extended knowledge of the wider business environment within which the systems life-cycle sits, and how systems engineering application itself requires systems thinking and practice to successfully integrate it within wider business and management processes and approaches


Syllabus

    Unit 1 – Enterprises and Lifecycles

    • Defining the Enterprise
    • Lifecycles, Process and Standardisation
    • Enterprise Requirements
    • Enterprise Architectures

     

    Unit 2 – Operations Management and Systems 1

    • Project, Programme and Portfolio Management
    • Finance and Commercial Decision Making
    • The Concept of Capability
    • Logistics and Supply Chain Management
    • Risk Management

    Unit 3 – Operations Management and Systems 2

    • Capability
    • Effects Based Engineering
    • Benefits Management
    • Relationship Management

     

    Unit 4 – Strategy, Integration and Practice

    • Strategic Management
    • Policy and Business Goals
    • Enterprise-level Integration
    • The Dynamic Enterprise


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Differentiate the contributions that systems engineering and allied disciplines each make to deliver successful business outcomes.
  • Choose and apply appropriate operations and relationship management theory to solve enterprise systems problems.
  • Create and manage an integrated cross-discipline aware, outcome-focused systems programme in the context of the wider business environment

Problem Analysis and System Definition

Module Leader
  • Rick Adcock
Aim

    Prepare students to undertake SE activates associated with the Concept Definition and System Definition elements of a Model Base SE approach.  Going from Enterprise needs to a logical solution options, Including consideration of dependability and through life plans.


Syllabus

    Unit 1: Model Based SE Life Cycle Processes

    • Overview of Life Cycle management and how SE Concept, Definition, Realisation and Deployment processes are related in a Model Based approach.
    • Extended context cover Mission Analysis, Logical Architecture and Requirements theory and models.

    Unit 2: Model Based Concept Definition

    • Overview of how an Enterprise explores possible problems within its overall strategy, working with diverse stakeholders to balance their needs, enterprise goals, technology maturity and wider issues and regulations.
    • Using Mission Analysis (MA) scenario modelling and OA to define problem context and stakeholder needs.

    Unit 3: Model Based System Definition

    • Overview of System Architecture and Requirements engineering as part of a model-based approach.
    • Using architecting notations to define Logical Architectures (LA), iterations between LA and MA.
    • Defining Stakeholder & System Requirements, requirements specification and review methods.

    Unit 4: Dependable Systems and Through Life Planning

    • Overview of system dependability and how it is considered as part of LA, planning through life SE activities to consider dependability (e.g. Human Factors, Safety, Security, Reliability, Support and Sustainability etc.) and other solution delivery issues, assessing whole life cost and risk.
    • Using dependability models views to expand LA and create dependability requirements.
    • Defining project plans, cost and risk based on LA and MA models in the context of enterprise planning

     


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Evaluate the application of Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) Concept Definition and Systems Definition life cycle processes to complex problems
  • Create Mission Analysis models using scenario based modelling, to explore enterprise needs
  • Create logical system architecture views to describe one or more whole system solution concepts
  • Apply Requirements Management processes to create and review Stakeholder Requirements
  • Plan a through life approach, including consideration of dependable system issues and whole life cost




System Design and Realisation

Module Leader
  • Dr Tim Ferris
Aim
    Prepare students to assess and critique the SE activities associated with the Design and Realisation phases of the life-cycle of an existing system and to propose modification to existing methods and the development of appropriate system design and realisation methods for new projects.
Syllabus
    Unit 1: System design

    •       Logical architecture,
    •       Physical architecture,
    •       Design devolution and specification of sub-systems,
    •       Choice to use bespoke development, COTS products, or re-use of existing systems/components.

    Unit 2: Integration, verification and validation

    •       Overview of system integration,
    •       Three approaches to integration: bottom up, top down, middle out,
    •       Overview of verification,
    •       Overview of validation,
    •       Challenges and strategies for effective and efficient verification and validation.

    Unit 3: Through life project delivery and system use

    •       Planning systems for through life support: consumables,
    •       System use: design for system readiness, effect of operational demand,
    •       Impact of change in environment and/or use patterns,
    •       Systems engineering aspects of logistics,
    •       Obsolescence and responses to the challenge.
    •       Overview of system retirement.

    Unit 4: Other considerations: acceptance, training, impact of organisational role allocations

    •       Overview of system acceptance process,
    •       Systems engineering aspects of training needs analysis and training system development,
    •       Examples of the impact on design of system boundary issues in the architecture of the system and the measures of performance applied to organisations interacting with the system.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  1. Develop and sustain cost-effective, timely and effective complex systems through the use of system level analytical tools applicable to the various life-cycle phases from design to retirement.
  2. Evaluate the contribution of the systems engineering processes to the design, implementation and through life phases of the system life-cycle.
  3. Propose and assess the systems engineering patterns, models, methods and tools needed for a successful integrated SE approach to the design, production, use and retirement of systems.
  4. Manage the integration of different specialist disciplines, to enable the development of systems recognized as successful through the whole system life-cycle.
 

Problem Analysis and System Definition Workshop

Module Leader
  • Dr Steve Barker
Aim

    Allow students to explore the problem space using a pluralistic SE problem-exploration approach, modelling the nature of the problem and allowing an initial logical architecture and requirements to be created and reviewed. This will draw on methods, tools and techniques studied during ISSE and PASD.

Syllabus

    Unit 1: Problem Exploration)

    • •       Analyse problem situation and its context/environment
    • •       Understand the nature of enterprise systems and how they relate to a problem situation
    • •       Apply SE tools and techniques to explore problem situations

    Unit 2: Concept Definition: Mission Analysis (MA)

    • •       Evaluate the application and development of scenario modelling and OA methods to quantify a problem context and support problem exploration
    • •       Evaluate applicability of SE tools to support MA

    Unit 3: System Definition: Requirements Engineering

    • •      Applying requirements engineering to create requirement views related to MA
    • •       Apply requirements management to document, review and configure requirements specifications
    • •       Overview of tools and case studies

    Unit 4: Systems Definition: Logical Architecture (LA)

    • Applying static and dynamic system modelling to describe and assess logical solution options (including  functional and dependability views)
    • Update requirements to account for changes identified during LA

    Unit 5: Through Life Planning

    •   Applying life cycle management and review to combine MA, LA and Requirement views into a solution option, assess whole life costs and risks
    •  Overview of data management, individual and team roles and skills, ethics and case studies 



Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 

  • Evaluate the appropriateness of Enterprise modelling and SE tools and methods to an example problem space
  • Plan and conduct Requirements management processes to create and review Stakeholder Requirements
  • Plan and conduct logical architecture modelling to describe one or more whole system solution concepts
  • Create and review a through life approach plan, including consideration of mission analysis, requirements and logical architecture
  • Evaluate the challenges of remote group working and other aspects of the professional practice of SE in the conduct of problem analysis and concept definition life cycle processes

 





System Design and Realisation Workshop

Module Leader
  • Dr Pathmeswaran Raju
Aim

    This module follows and builds on System Design and Realisation, in which students are prepared with theoretical knowledge to assess and critique the SE activities associated with the design and realisation phases of the life cycle.

    In this module students perform the SE work of the design and realisation phases of the life cycle in a group project environment. In this team environment students will experience the challenges of SE team working across both face-to-face and distance environments, typical of many projects in many organisations.

    The purpose of this module is to demand students perform the design and realisation processes of a project and enable them to experience the practical issues of integrating their individual contributions to the project and to demand they demonstrate professional reflection on the process


Syllabus

    Unit 1: Preliminary Design

    • Logical-physical allocation
    • Systems requirements
    • Measures of effectiveness
    • Logical and physical trade-off analysis
    • Architecture modelling tools

    Unit 2: Detailed Design

    • System specifications and interfaces
    • System analysis and design trades
    • Modelling, prototyping and robust design
    • Design for x (environment, manufacturability, assembly)
    • Modelling and simulation tools

    Unit 3: Integration, Verification and Validation

    • System integration and qualification
    • System testing and acceptance
    • Design and V&V
    • Hardware and software testing
    • Software and testing tools

    Unit 4: System Deployment and Support

    • System deployment and use
    • System operation and maintenance
    • System modifications and sustainment
    • System retirement and disposal
    • Processes, methods and tools

    Unit 5: Through Project Execution

    • System life-cycle management and review
    • Consumables and project supply chain
    • Data and IPR management
    • Enterprise, team and individual roles and training needs
    • Ethics and sustainability issues

     



Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Select and plan the use of an appropriate set of SE tools and methods to perform the life cycle phase from Preliminary Design to Retirement, inclusive, to enable effective development of a system,
  • Plan and manage the use of SE tools and methods to develop a system from Preliminary Design to Retirement, and demonstrate that the system is an appropriate solution for the need it addresses,
  • Review the system plans that have been developed to demonstrate that the solution offered is a coherent proposal that addresses all the perspectives necessary to ensure the system will be effective throughout its intended life cycle,
  • Recognise and evaluate the challenges of making a system design which is a fundamentally coherent solution in a distributed team environment,
  • Evaluate the challenges of ensuring coherence of a system development in a distributed team environment.



Research Methods

Module Leader
  • Dr Steve Barker
Aim
    Professional practice, in any field, is based on the application of knowledge about things, materials, phenomena and methods. The advancement of professional practice requires methods to develop assured knowledge of any, or combinations of, the things, materials, phenomena and methods which are the subject matter of the profession. In addition, the practice of many professions is a creative process of discovering the most appropriate solution to a task and therefore competence in research methods is required to either perform the advanced practice of the profession or to make discoveries that improve the profession. This module approaches the matter of research methods from this position of research being conducted in both the improvement and the practice of the profession. Therefore the approach used in the module focuses on identifying the objective of the project and development of a method of investigation and a method of assuring the results which could take any of a wide span of methods. Effective research, which fulfils the purpose for which it is done, requires clear statement of what is investigated which in turn leads to clarity of method, and the use of a method which can achieve the intended purpose.
Syllabus
    Unit 1: System design

    •       Logical architecture,
    •       Physical architecture,
    •       Design devolution and specification of sub-systems,
    •       Choice to use bespoke development, COTS products, or re-use of existing systems/components.

    Unit 2: Integration, verification and validation

    •       Overview of system integration,
    •       Three approaches to integration: bottom up, top down, middle out,
    •       Overview of verification,
    •       Overview of validation,
    •       Challenges and strategies for effective and efficient verification and validation.

    Unit 3: Through life project delivery and system use

    •       Planning systems for through life support: consumables,
    •       System use: design for system readiness, effect of operational demand,
    •       Impact of change in environment and/or use patterns,
    •       Systems engineering aspects of logistics,
    •       Obsolescence and responses to the challenge.
    •       Overview of system retirement.

    Unit 4: Other considerations: acceptance, training, impact of organisational role allocations

    •       Overview of system acceptance process,
    •       Systems engineering aspects of training needs analysis and training system development,
    •       Examples of the impact on design of system boundary issues in the architecture of the system and the measures of performance applied to organisations interacting with the system.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  1. Transform a description of an area of interest into a precisely worded research question, the answering of which will provide knowledge which is useful for the purpose for which the research project is to be conducted.
  2. Search the literature and recognise existing research relevant to a research question at hand and to prioritise a reading list if too much material is found.
  3. Use existing research literature to propose an opposite method to address a research question.
  4. Justify a proposed method to address a research project as a suitable method to generate knowledge of the kind that will achieve a result that will satisfy the motivating purpose of a research project.

Human Systems Engineering

Module Leader
  • Dr Fanny Camelia
Aim

    Provide students with an understanding of the challenges raised by the consideration of humans in systems, and the tools and techniques for considering human system issues across the SE life cycle as part of a Model Base SE approach.


Syllabus

               Unit 1: Human considerations in engineering

    • Ergonomics, Human Factors (HF) and Human Factor Engineering
    • Human in engineered systems: Human-machine design
    • Human Factor (HF) integration to SE life cycle

      Unit 2: Wider human considerations in engineering: Organisational and cultural Issues

      • Organisational and cultural issues which influence the SE life cycle
      • Case Studies
      • Principles of human modelling in SE 

       Unit 3: Role of HF in Problem Analysis and System Definition

    • HF methods (Part 1)
    • HF methods integration into the SE life cycle (Part 1)
    • Applying HF workshop (Part 1)

                Unit 4: Role of HF in Problem Analysis and System Definition

    • HF methods (Part 2)
    • HF methods integration into the SE life cycle (Part 2)
    • Applying HF workshop (Part 2

     



Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Assess the ways that human are considered and modelled in complex socio-technical systems
  • Evaluate the wider organisational and cultural drivers which affect the development of complex systems
  • Create human factors models to support Problem Analysis and System Definition
  • Create human factors models to support System Design and Realisation




Dependability and Resilience

Module Leader
  • Dr Tim Ferris
Aim
    Prepare students to specify dependability and resilience characteristics of systems, and to assess the dependability and resilience of system proposals and implementations as part of the verification and validation review of systems, and as part of the management of existing systems.
     
Syllabus
    Unit 1: Foundational concepts

    • The concepts of function, failure, fault and defect in the context of reliability, maintenance, maintainability, availability and resilience
    • Relationship of availability, reliability and maintainability and systems engineering
    • Contracting for availability, reliability and maintainability
    • Maintenance strategies to support dependability
    • Overview of schools of thought in resilience

    Unit 2: Analysis of reliability, maintainability and availability

    • Mechanisms of failure and their mathematical description
    • Concepts and introductory analysis of:
    • Fault Tree Analysis
    • Redundancy
    • Corrective and preventive maintenance
    • Maintenance strategies to provide equipment repair, overhaul and Through Life Support
    • Logistic Support and Support Chain
    • Integrated Logistic Support process
    • Failure Modes Effects and Criticality Analysis
    • Level of Repair Analysis
    • Health and Usage Monitoring Systems and prognostics

    Unit 3: Introduction to resilience

    • Overview of resilience
    • Relationship of schools of thought in resilience and systems thinking concepts
    • Hollnagel; Jackson’s resilience principles; “resilient to …”; managed response to threat
    • Distinction between resilience and other disciplines: reliability, security, safety
    • The different challenges presented by predicted threat types and unpredicted threat types

    Unit 4: Resilience in systems engineering

    • Design for resilience through system architecture
    • Measurement of resilience: post hoc measures; predictive measures
    • Specification for resilience – what needs to be resilient?
     


Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Apply systems thinking knowledge to articulate the dependability and resilience issues associated with particular systems.
2. Analyse the cost, availability and effectiveness of systems given given characteristics of the elements and specify the characteristics of the system elements to provide intended system attributes.
3. Evaluate the contribution of the systems engineering processes and methods to the achievement of dependable and resilient systems.
4. Plan and evaluate the systems engineering methods required to provide dependable and resilient systems.
5. Analyse complex systems properties that enable dependability and resilience to ensure they are appropriately addressed across the life-cycle.


Simulation in the Systems Engineering Lifecycle

Aim
    To allow students to assess the role of simulation modelling across the systems engineering lifecycle, from concept through to disposal.  The module will enable students to critically assess the roles and applications of simulation modelling and to analyse issues related to quantitative modelling such as data availability and model verification and validation.  It will also allow students to create and evaluate simple models.

Syllabus
    Unit 1: Foundations of Simulation Modelling

    The fundamental concepts of simulation modelling and how simulation is used in the SE lifecycle.
    The theoretical basis of quantitative modelling
    The role of modelling in supporting decision making.

    Unit 2: Appreciation of Modelling in the SE Context

    Model types; discrete and continuous, stochastic and deterministic.
    Model appropriateness: the verification and validation of models, data considerations, model fidelity
    Model interoperability and networking.

    Unit 3: Introduction to Modelling Paradigms

    Discrete event simulation
    System dynamics modelling
    Agent based models
    Virtual reality

    Unit 4: Model building and analysis

    Introduction to simulation methods and tools
    Simulation as experimentation.

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Evaluate the role of simulation modelling in the successful realization of systems 
2. Critically evaluate the issues surrounding the use of simulation models in the systems engineering lifecycle.
3. Appreciate the key benefits and risks associated with a number of modelling paradigms.
4. Build and analyse simple models using a range of methodologies.
 

Software and Cyber Systems Engineering

Module Leader
  • Dr Pathmeswaran Raju
Aim
    Software plays a crucial role in both systems development processes and systems functionality in complex systems development. This makes it important for systems engineers to have understanding of software engineering and the issues surrounding cyber threats and cyber management systems. This module provides students with an understanding of software engineering and cyber systems by covering central principles, methods and tools in the context of systems engineering.
Syllabus
    Unit 1: Software Engineering and Systems Engineering

    Processes and lifecycle models,
    Software development methodologies,
    Types of software systems,
    Software system requirements.

    Unit 2: Software Architectures and Models

    Component-based software engineering,
    Distributed software engineering,
    Real-time software engineering,
    Service-oriented software engineering.

    Unit 3: Cyber Systems and Security  

    Cyber vulnerabilities and threats,  
    Cyber management systems,
    Security and Safety,
    Policies and processes,
    Developing architecture and requirements workshop 1.

    Unit 4: Integration and Testing

    Software system integration,
    Verification and validation,
    In-service and disposal,
    Software process improvement,
    Developing integration and test plans workshop 2.
     

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

1. Assess the role of software engineering and software development methodologies in developing and maintaining complex systems,
2. Create software system architectures, models and requirements for a software intensive system,
3. Analyse cyber threats and cyber management requirements for developing and maintaining software intensive systems,
4. Evaluate various approaches and methods for software integration and testing.

Megaproject Systems

Module Leader
  • Matthew Summers
Aim

    Megaprojects are large, complex projects that typically have a value of above $1Bn. Once considered rarities, megaprojects are not only large, but growing constantly larger and are being constructed in ever greater numbers. From high-speed rail to modern major defence projects, or from staging the Olympics to implementing national 5G communications networks, megaprojects affect our normal everyday lives and can impact millions of people.

    What sets megaproject systems apart from more traditional system is not just their size but their complexity and scope – megaprojects often straddle public and private sector boundaries and are intrinsically linked to the general public. This means that technological, political, economic and societal aspects all coalesce and play an important role - both overtly and covertly – to system success.

    This module explores the realm of megaproject systems and expands the traditional systems engineering approaches, thinking and methods to identify and address the complexity and closer integration of hard engineering, design, management and social sciences within a single entity.



Syllabus

    Unit 1 – The Megaproject Engineering Mindset

    • What are Megaprojects?
    • The Megaproject Paradox
    • System of Systems Engineering for Megaprojects
    • Systems Thinking in a Megaproject Context

    Unit 2 – Planning and Delivery

    • Megaproject Design
    • Megaproject Lifecycles
    • Systems Integration at the Megaproject Level
    • Megaprojects and Risk
    • Benefits Management in Complex Environments

     

    Unit 3 – Towards the Boundary and Beyond: Context

    • Behavioural Economics
    • The Political Dimension – Drivers, Blockers and Influencers
    • Macroeconomics
    • Risk Redux

     

    Unit 4 – Accounting for Change

    • System Evolution Dynamics
    • The System Evolution, Project Control and Agile Approaches Trade-off
    • Culture, Competition and Geopolitics
    • Ethical Aspects of Megaprojects
    • Teraprojects

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Extend established systems engineering approaches to the megaproject domain.
  • Assemble and integrate appropriate methods and tools to account for socio-economic and political influences within the megaproject systems life-cycle.
  • Formulate and defend a megaproject-level systems engineering management plan.
  • Identify, evaluate and mitigate system evolution and dynamically generated risks
  • Translate, summarise and communicate critical systems engineering elements of megaproject management to non-systems engineers to maximise project success

Your career

Takes you on to impressive career prospects across a range of roles commensurate with your experience. This includes membership of multidisciplinary teams in acquisition, supply or research organisations. This could be in both general systems engineering roles or as a focal point for specific skills such as availability, reliability and maintenance (ARM), human factors, requirements, architecture test and evaluation etc. It is also applicable to key roles in MoD acquisition such as project team leader, capability manager and requirements manager.

How to apply

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview. Applicants based outside of the UK may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.