This course focuses on the value of information and the principles and practice that underlie secure, effective and efficient business systems that exploit information in order to provide business benefit.

Overview

  • Start dateSeptember/January
  • DurationMSc: 11 months full-time, up to five years part-time. PgDip : Up to 11 months full-time, up to four years part-time. PgCert: Upto 11 months full-time, up to 3 years part-time
  • DeliverySpread throughout the programme and includes coursework, group presentations and examinations during the taught phase and for the MSc a research based dissertation.
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time / Part-time
  • CampusCranfield University at Shrivenham

Who is it for?

Students from Government departments, industry and other organisations within the UK and internationally come together to study and discuss issues and develop skills that will enable solutions now and in the future.

Key goals of the course are to provide students with the knowledge to:

  • Develop in individuals an awareness of the management, user and supplier communities
  • Recognise the stakeholder roles, needs and expectations within these communities
  • Enable effective communication and a shared understanding between these stakeholders in order to meet capability objectives
  • Master the principles and practice that underlie the delivery of effective, efficient and secure systems in various business spaces that exploit information in order to provide strategic benefit.

Why this course?

There is a need to understand the strategic importance of information and develop agile, effective and secure ways to exploit it to its full potential. To do this, effective information capability management must be developed throughout the organisation so that the right information is available to the right people at the right time in an effective, efficient and secure manner. 
The internationally recognised Information Capability Management (ICM) MSc has been developed to address these important issues.Skilled professionals are needed to enable organisations to realise the strategic benefits that successfully exploiting information can provide. Success in business of all types and in all sectors, both public and private, is dependant on:

  • Understanding the value of information as a strategic asset
  • Developing agile, effective and efficient systems that make this information available
  • Countering cyber threats with appropriate cyber security. 

Informed by Industry

The Information Capability Management MSc has an External Advisory Panel that is made up of senior stakeholders from Government, industry, academia and professional bodies that meet to provide input regarding the strategic direction of the course.

Accreditation

This course is accredited by two professional bodies, the British Computer Society (BCS) and the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (CILIP), completion of the course can lead to chartered professional status.

BCS accreditation logo

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Course details

MSc students must complete a taught phase consisting of twelve modules followed by an individual dissertation in a relevant topic. 

PgDip students are required to undertake the same taught phase as the MSc, without the individual dissertation. PgCert students must complete the core module (Foundations of Information Systems) together with five other modules.

Individual project

The individual project is the opportunity for a student to utilise and demonstrate their understanding of the taught phase of the course by applying their learning to a real world problem. It is also an opportunity to develop skills and achieve a greater level of understanding in a specific area or areas of relevance to the course. Students are allocated a supervisor and have access to subject matter experts to support them in the project phase.

Assessment

Spread throughout the programme and includes coursework, group presentations and examinations during the taught phase and for the MSc a research based dissertation.

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory modules and (where applicable) some elective modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Cyber Security and Information Assurance

Module Leader
  • Darren Lawrence
Aim

    To enable students to understand the field of Cyber Security & Information Assurance (IA), to be able to make use of the concepts that underpin the subject and to appreciate the dependencies between them.



Syllabus
    Foundations of cyber security and IA,
     risk theory and practice,
     strategy,
     threats and vulnerabilities,
     governance and management,
     socio-technical perspectives.


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a diligent student should be able to:

 design and assess organisation - wide processes to ensure good Cyber Security and IA,
 evaluate Cyber Security and IA risk from a nation state, societal and organisational perspective,
 assess the dependencies between people, process and technology when developing risk mitigation strategies for Cyber Security and IA.

 

 




Emerging Technology Monitoring

Module Leader
  • Ian Owens
Aim

    To enable students to identify and assess new and emerging technology defence and security in order to provide an on-going assessment of their relevance and potential to defence and security.

     



Syllabus
    • Generic methods and tools

      • Horizon scanning
      • Predictive methods
      • Strategic assessment of new technologies
      • Evaluation
      • Maintaining personal awareness

    • Emerging technologies: a selection of currently relevant technologies will be studied


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 
Knowledge


Appraise emerging technologies
Evaluate emerging technology that are likely to impact on national security and defence in the next five years
Contrast the methods available for identifying and managing the risks and benefits of the use of emerging technology
 
Skills


Exploit emerging technologies in relevant working practices
Compare and contrast emerging technologies appropriate to a particular scenario in order to assess potential business benefit

 

 

 


Foundations of Information Systems

Module Leader
  • Ross Harris
Aim
    To evaluate the context of the course
    To review and update core vocabulary and concepts required as a foundation for the other elements of the course
    Development of academic study skills
Syllabus
     Course structure and the information profession
     Information systems overview
     Enabling technologies overview
     Information systems modelling
     Research methods, learning and study skills
     
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:


Knowledge

• Appraise the key academic concepts and language of current IS foundation knowledge, research and practice

Skills

• Critically evaluate published research 
• Conduct independent research
• Write academically credible and professional reports 


Methods and Tools for Information Systems Development

Aim
    To equip students with the knowledge and skills to understand and apply appropriate models, methods, tools, techniques and approaches to develop information systems at the strategic level.
Syllabus
    • Software Development Lifecycle Models
    • Systems vs reductionist thinking
    • IS development methodologies 
      • Hard
      • Soft
      • Agile
    • Information Systems Failure
    • Alternative approaches to IS development:
      • Enterprise Resource Planning Systems
      • Commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS)-based development.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge

  • Justify the selection of information methods and tools relevant to the planning and organisation of information systems development projects at the organisational level
  • Document the wider organisational and environmental issues that contribute to successful information systems development

     

    Skills

  • Appraise SDLC process models
  • Critically compare IS development methodologies
  • Evaluate the importance of the philosophies underlying different IS development methodologies
  • Evaluate competing analysis and design techniques



Organisation Development

Aim

    To provide the basis for considering the implementation of information systems within the wider organisational context by taking a systems thinking approach.

Syllabus
    • Organisation development
    • Organisational change
    • Systems thinking
    • IT project implementation
    • New technology in the workplace.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge

  • Describe and critique the key principles of systems and systems thinking
  • Evaluate theories proposing organisations as systems
  • Review and plan improvements to organisational procedures governing change management

    Skills

  • Appraise the principles of systems thinking in relation to the exploration and management of problems in organisations
  • Appraise people-centric issues that can positively contribute to, or hamper, the design and implementation of information systems
  • Evaluate and analyse business processes, identify alternative solutions, assess feasibility and recommend new approaches



Professional Issues

Aim

    To promote awareness of legal and regulatory issues which affect information systems professionals; to introduce the professional bodies of relevance to such professionals, and to encourage debate on some of the major issues of concern to the information systems world.

Syllabus
    • Legislation and regulations of relevance to the information systems professional (e.g. Data Protection, Copyright, Computer Misuse etc)
    • Professional responsibilities, professional societies and codes of practice (e.g. those of British Computer Society)
    • Contemporary issues relating to information technology management.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge

  • Evaluate and contribute to the debate on issues of importance to today’s information systems users and professionals
  • Appraise how legislation and regulation affect the context within which information systems professionals’ work

    Skills

  • Interpret legal and regulatory issues in relation to professional practice
  • Compare and evaluate the relevant professional societies and their codes of practice
  • Interpret contemporary professional issues in relation to personal experience



Programme and Project Management for Information Systems

Aim
    To develop knowledge and skills in the key academic concepts of the management of resources in order to plan, estimate and carry out programmes of information systems development work to time, budget and quality targets and in accordance with appropriate standards.
Syllabus
    • Programme management
    • Project management
    • Tools and techniques (Gantt, Pert, etc)
    • Project teams, leadership and management.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

  • Critically appraise the management of projects involving the development and implementation of information systems in order to co-ordinate a portfolio of projects that achieve benefits of strategic importance
  • Critically analyse project management roles and responsibilities from a senior team leadership perspective in order to be able to identify areas for improvement
  • Evaluate approaches to programme and project management to determine sound practice
  • Critique real life experience of programme and project management in order to determine the factors that generate project success.

Software Engineering (IS)

Aim
    To provide students with an appreciation of problems associated with the development of software-intensive systems and to establish the role of systematic techniques, methods and defined processes which address these problems.


Syllabus
    • Introduction to Software Engineering. This section will provide context and background on the fundamental aspects of software engineering including: an introduction to the SDLC (Software Development Lifecycle), the characteristics of good software, and professional and ethical responsibilities.
    • Software Process Models: This section will provide an introduction to the importance of software process models and methodologies, including: Waterfall, Spiral, Iterative and Agile development.
    • Understanding the Problem: This will cover the process of requirements gathering and engineering.
    • Designing a Solution: This section will focus on the key characteristics of well-designed software, an introduction to object oriented design, software modelling using UML (Unified Modelling Language), and user interface design.
    • Delivering a Product: This section will provide an introduction to the fundamental concepts of programming, how to select an appropriate programming language and the methods of software cost estimation.
    • Building Confidence: This will provide an understanding of the importance of testing within software engineering, as well as the role of maintenance within software development.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge

  • Explain the role of software engineering in developing and maintaining complex software systems.
  • Justify the selection of a software process model for managing the development and delivery of a software system.
  • Evaluate the different approaches for software testing that can be used to ensure software quality.

     

    Skills

  • Design appropriate user interfaces that enable efficient Human Computer Interaction (HCI) with software applications.
  • Construct documentation for software analysis and design using appropriate modelling techniques.



Digital Business Strategy

Aim

    To equip students with the knowledge and skills to develop or review an information systems strategy to support an organisation’s business goals and the development of plans to drive forward and manage that strategy within an organisational, professional and legislative framework.

Syllabus
    • Strategy and strategic information systems in context
    • Strategic analysis
    • Strategy development
    • Analytical tools
    • Information systems and strategy alignment.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge

  • Formulate Digital Business Strategy and plans appropriate to a particular organisation and its environment
  • Appraise issues relating to the implementation and maintenance of Digital strategy
  • Justify in terms of organisational business benefit strategies for the management of information and applications

    Skills

  • Analyse and refine organisational strategy and policy for a selected organisation in order to identify the core competencies to be supported by Digital Strategy
  • Align organisational business and IS/IT strategy for a selected organisation such that the IS/IT strategy supported the business objectives
  • Review strategy for a selected organisation against relevant legislative and professional issues to identify gaps
  • Justify the selection of methods and tools relevant to the formulation of information strategy and plans

 


Systems Architecture

Module Leader
  • Dr Duncan Hodges
Aim

    To enable students to contribute to the specification of systems architectures, identifying the components needed to meet the present and future requirements of the business as a whole, and the interrelationships between these components.



Syllabus
    • What is Systems Architecture?
    • Representation of architectures
    • IS quality attributes
    • Architectural strategies (styles) and tactics
    • Architectural design
    • Evaluation of architectures
    • Architectural frameworks
    • IS technology

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge

  • Differentiate between different architectural strategies and tactics based on their cost, effectiveness and user needs
  • Critically evaluate IS architectures against business needs

 Skills

  • Distinguish the steps required to develop an IS architecture
  • Appraise the variety of approaches to architecture development driven by the different architectural frameworks, such as TOGAF, DoDAF and MODAF
  • Critically compare the underlying IS technology which determines the selection of the architectural strategies and tactics
  • Evaluate the importance of the philosophies underlying different IS development methodologies
  • Evaluate competing analysis and design techniques




Data Led Decision Support

Module Leader
  • Dr Duncan Hodges
Aim
    The aim of this module is to provide an understanding of the processes by which organisations and individuals can gain insight and actionable intelligence from data.
Syllabus

    • Information visualisation
    • Data mining pipeline
    • Big data models for exploring data
    • Data analytics




Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

• Design appropriate visualisations based on user requirements
• Appraise current practices for decision support in organisations
• Contrast methods of analysing data to enable business intelligence
• Assess the appropriateness of big data models for generating insight





Data Modelling, Storage and Management

Module Leader
  • Dr Duncan Hodges
Aim

    The aim of this module is to lead the student through the different approaches to data modelling, in addition to understanding competing technologies for storage and management.

Syllabus

    • Data, information and knowledge
    • Introduction to data storage technologies
    • Data retrieval techniques
    • Structure query language (SQL)
    • Physical storage
    • Semantic web
    • Non-traditional models for data storage (NoSQL, Big data, Cloud)





Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

• Differentiate between data, information and knowledge in business contexts
• Design suitable data models for efficient storage and retrieval
• Compose appropriate queries to translate data into information
• Appraise the applicability of non-traditional models for storage within an organisation




Dissertation

Module Leader
  • Antoinette Caird-Daley
Aim

    To enable students to develop and demonstrate their expertise, independent learning abilities, and critical appraisal skills to research and analyse a relevant information systems issue, challenge or opportunity, with practical application, in a 20,000 – 25,000 word evidence-based dissertation.


Syllabus

    Students work independently but with guidance from a supervisor to apply the knowledge acquired during the taught phase of the course to a relevant information management and technology problem, which should fulfill the requirements of the British Computer Society accreditation.

     This dissertation provides an opportunity for students to carry out an in-depth specialised study of a topic of personal and/or professional interest. It enables the integration of the theoretical and practical aspects of a topic, revealing an understanding of theoretical principles and how they can be applied in the chosen area of research.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should have:

Knowledge

• Critically appraise and integrate a large body of published research
• Evaluate theory and concepts in relation to primary and secondary sources of evidence
• Synthesise the technical, social, theoretical and practical elements of the taught modules in order to generate information capability solutions for real world organisational problems

Skills

​• Design and conduct an independent and large-scale research project, including the writing and modifying of a proposal, data collection and analysis in the compilation of a major project
• Produce and revise an appropriate project management plan
• Demonstrate problem solving skills
• Write clearly and effectively in the appropriate academic style and formally present the dissertation in accordance with the approved criteria












Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2019 to 2020 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (24 July 2018).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.



MSc Full-time £19,000
MSc Part-time £19,000 *
PgDip Full-time £15,300
PgDip Part-time £15,300 *
PgCert Full-time £7,650
PgCert Part-time £7,650 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • For self-funded applicants a non-refundable £500 deposit is payable on offer acceptance and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

MSc Full-time £19,000
MSc Part-time £19,000 *
PgDip Full-time £15,300
PgDip Part-time £15,300 *
PgCert Full-time £7,650
PgCert Part-time £7,650 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • For self-funded applicants a non-refundable £500 deposit is payable on offer acceptance and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

Funding Opportunities

To help students find and secure appropriate funding, we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia)
Cranfield offers competitive scholarships for Mexican students in conjunction with Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia) in science, technology and engineering.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England
A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Santander MSc Scholarship
The Santander Scholarship at Cranfield University is worth £5,000 towards tuition fees for full-time master's courses. Check the scholarship page to find out if you are from an eligible Santander Universities programme country.

Chevening Scholarships
Chevening Scholarships are awarded to outstanding emerging leaders to pursue a one-year master’s at Cranfield university. The scholarship includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS)
The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Commonwealth Scholarships for Developing Countries
Students from developing countries who would not otherwise be able to study in the UK can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship which includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Future Finance Student Loans
Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

To find out about funding for UK MOD staff, please visit the MOD funding and eligibility page.

For all other applicants please contact cdsadmissionsoffice@cranfield.ac.uk for more information.




Entry requirements

A first or second class Honours degree or equivalent in science, engineering or mathematics. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.


English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Security clearance for Shrivenham

Some Cranfield University courses are delivered at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham which is a Ministry of Defence (MOD) site. All applicants to courses that are wholly or partially delivered at Shrivenham must complete the BPSS (HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard V4 April 2014) prior to registration on the course or must already hold a security clearance to this level or higher.

Please visit our security clearance page for further information.

Your career

Takes you on to further senior career opportunities and to become one of the next generation of senior professionals delivering business benefit through exploitation of information with skills in appropriate areas including business analysis, strategy development and implementation, information assurance, cyber security, organisational development and strategic application of information systems.

How to apply

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview. Applicants based outside of the UK may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.