Background

Hannah graduated with First Class Honours in BSc Archaeology with Forensic Science from University of Exeter in 2014, and was also the recipient of an award for the Best Finalist Dissertation in Archaeology and Dean's Commendation.

The following year Hannah completed a MSc in Forensic Osteology from Bournemouth University, graduating in 2016 with Distinction. The thesis written, as part of this postgraduate degree, was concerned with investigating the structural and mechanical properties of synthetic bone, which led to an interest in the field of bone biomechanics.

Hannah is now a full-time PhD student at Cranfield University, working under the supervision of Professor Peter Zioupos and Dr Nicholas Marquez-Grant.

Current activities

Hannah is currently working on her doctoral research concerning forensic science aspects of the ageing skeleton, focusing specifically on the rib and clavicle bones. A combination of non-invasive and invasive methods will be used to better assess changes that occur to the internal structure and mechanical properties of these skeletal elements with age.

The techniques included in the adopted multimethod and inter-disciplinary approach are micro-computed tomography, dynamic mechanical analysis, nanoindentation and DSC-TGA.

Hannah is also currently working in collaboration with Dr Elena Kranioti and Andrea Bonicelli from Edinburgh University.

Cranfield Online Research Data (CORD) Portfolio: https://figshare.com/authors/Hannah_McGivern/3188730 

Publications

Conference Papers

  • McGivern H, Greenwood C, Marquez-Grant N & Zioupos P (2018) Getting to the bare bones of the age –related changes to the mechanical and structural properties of the clavicle. In: Bone Research Society (BRS) Annual Meeting, Stripe Building, King Alfred Campus, University of Winchester, Winchester, 27-29 June 2018.