Contact Dr Enrico Fontana

Background

Enrico is a senior lecturer of sustainable business and part of the sustainability group at Cranfield School of Management. He is also an affiliated researcher at Mistra Centre for Sustainable Markets (Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden) and a visiting fellow at Sasin School of Management (Chulalongkorn University, Thailand). He is interested in social and environmental challenges in emerging markets, and especially on how to address them systematically.

Enrico holds a BA in Business Administration from Bocconi University (Milan, Italy), an MSc in International Management (CEMS) from University College Dublin (Dublin, Ireland), an MBA in Management and Finance from McGill University (Montreal, Canada) and a PhD in Business Administration with a major in Sustainable Business from Stockholm School of Economics (Stockholm, Sweden). Before joining Cranfield, he completed his postdoctoral studies at University of Victoria (Victoria, BC, Canada) and worked as a lecturer with a focus on sustainable business at Sasin School of Management (Bangkok, Thailand). Enrico also worked as an Area Manager in the apparel industry in Italy and Japan for 6 years and has been collaborating with the United Nations University on the topic of sustainable textile manufacturing in Bangladesh.

Enrico has published numerous chapters and articles in academic journals, including Journal of Business Ethics, Journal of Business Research, and Business Strategy and the Environment.

Current activities

Enrico's main research agenda is centred on the phenomena of corporate social responsibility, corporate sustainability and sustainable supply chains in emerging markets, especially in South and Southeast Asia. He is involved in two ongoing research projects: 1) implementing social responsibility and sustainability in emerging markets' supply chains and 2) building a more inclusive workplace. 

As a qualitative researcher, Enrico truly believes in the power of ethnography to better understand how to solve social and environmental challenges, and spends considerable time on the context of inquiry. Much of the evidence in his research projects and articles includes the voices of the people (managers and workers) and the perspectives of organizations in emerging markets.