The MSc portfolio within our Energy and Power programme has recently been reviewed. This is to ensure that our courses are attractive to prospective students and to make sure that the courses titles and student learning outcomes are relevant to future employers. As a result of the review for October 2018 this course will merge with other Renewable courses to become Renewable Energy.

Climate change, growing populations and limited fossil fuel resources mean that demand for renewable energy continues at an ever-increasing rate. Renewable energy is now at the heart of every informed discussion concerning energy sustainability, security and affordability.

renewable energy

At a glance

  • Start dateFull-time October, part-time throughout the year
  • DurationOne year full-time, two-three years part-time.
  • DeliveryThe taught modules 40%, The Group Project 20%, The Individual Research Project 40%
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time / Part-time

Who is it for?

The MSc in Renewable Energy Engineering is made up of eight compulsory taught modules, a group project and an individual research project.

This course is suitable for engineering, maths or science graduates who wish to specialise in renewable energy engineering. This course will equip you with the advanced interdisciplinary skills required to design, optimise and evaluate the technical and economic viability of renewable energy schemes. You will have the opportunity to learn state-of-the-art technical skills required to design renewable energy systems including Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA). 

Why this course?

Renewable energy is now at the heart of every informed discussion concerning energy sustainability, security and affordability. The member states of the EU have signed up to legally binding targets of 20% energy from renewable sources by 2020. In order to meet these targets, a significant number of highly trained engineers are required worldwide.

In addition to management, communication, team work and research skills, each student will attain at least the following learning outcomes from this degree course:

  • Demonstrate knowledge, fundamental understanding and critical awareness of renewable energy engineering techniques necessary for renewable energy conversion systems
  • Demonstrate systematic knowledge across appropriate advanced technologies and management issues to provide solutions for international industries and/or research organisations
  • Demonstrate the ability to acquire, critically assess the relative merits, and effectively use appropriate information from a variety of sources.

The MSc in Renewable Energy Engineering benefits from a wide range of cultural backgrounds from across Europe and Overseas, which significantly enhances the learning experience for both staff and students. Cranfield University is very well located for visiting part-time students from all over the world, and offers a range of library and support facilities to support your studies. This enables students from all over the world to complete this qualification whilst balancing work/life commitments.

Informed by Industry

We have a world class reputation for our industrial-scale research and pilot-scale demonstration programmes in the energy sector. Close engagement with the energy and transport sectors over the last 20 years has produced long-standing strategic partnerships with the sectors most prominent players. The strategic links with industry ensures that all of the material taught on the course is relevant, timely and meets the needs of organisations competing within the energy sector. This industry-led education makes our graduates some of the most desirable in the world for energy companies to recruit.

Your teaching team

You will be taught by a multidisciplinary team of experts in Cranfield. Our teaching team includes:

  • Dr Taka Nishino, Course Director and expert in aerodynamics, hydrodynamics and offshore renewable energy.

  • Dr Maurizio Collu, whose research is focused on offshore wind turbine (HAWT and VAWT) floating support structures: conceptual and preliminary design, microalgae cultivation for biofuel production: modelling and engineering and Aerodynamically Alleviated Marine Vehicles: conceptual and preliminary design, dynamics.

  • Dr Patrick Luk, whose current research interests include electric machines and drives for all types of hybrid and electric vehicles including land, air, surface and sub-sea; electric drivetrain for renewable energy systems and high frequency AC power transfer and contact-less/inductive power transfer.

Our staff are practitioners as well as tutors, with clients that include Shell, Siemens and Alstom Power. Knowledge gained working with our clients is continually fed back into the teaching programme, to ensure that you benefit from the very latest knowledge and techniques affecting industry.


Accreditation

This MSc degree is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE).

Institution of Mechanical Engineers logo 

Course details

The taught programme for the renewable energy engineering masters is generally delivered from October to February and is comprised of eight compulsory modules. The modules are delivered over one to two weeks of intensive delivery with the later part of the module being free from structured teaching to allow time for more independent learning and reflection. 

Students on the part-time programme will complete all of the compulsory modules based on a flexible schedule that will be agreed with the course director.

Group project

The aim of the group project is to provide you with direct experience of applying knowledge to an industrially relevant problem that requires a team-based multi-disciplinary solution. It is undertaken between October and March. In addition to gaining experience working in technical project teams, you will deliver presentations and learn other valuable skills.

It is clear that the modern design engineer cannot be divorced from the commercial world. In order to provide practice in this matter, a poster presentation will be required from all students. This presentation provides the opportunity to develop presentation skills and effectively handle questions about complex issues in a professional manner. All groups must also submit a written report.

Recent Group Projects include:

  • Development of educational renewable energy kits (with Ecostyle Ltd)
  • Floating offshore wind turbines coupled dynamics math modelling and experimental verification.
  • Scaling-up the tension moored PLAT-O tidal energy platform from 100kW to 1MW
  • JMOIO - foundation concept selector for offshore wind  turbine foundations (with Ramboll).

Individual project

This is undertaken during March to September, and allows you to focus on a specific area of interest. You will develop the skills to design, optimise and evaluate the technical and economic viability of renewable energy schemes. It is common for our industrial partners to propose potential research topics. For part-time students, it is usually undertaken in collaboration with your organisation.

Recent individual research projects include:

  • Numerical Predictions of the Hydrodynamic Drag of the Plat-o Tidal Energy Converter and Comparison with Measurements in a Water Channel
  • Efficiency Improvement and Commercial Application of a VAWT
  • Wind Resource Prediction and Assessment
  • Dynamics of a Drive Train System for Offshore Floating Wind Turbines
  • Aerodyn Software Feasibility Assessment for Tidal Turbines Design
  • Energy Saving Optimisation and Intelligent ‘Internet of Things’ control for a Typical Commercial Building or an Industrial Plant
  • Development of Advanced Approximation Methods for Reliability Assessment with Application in Computational Fluid Dynamics
  • Electromagnetic Rectifier for Torque Ripple in Cranfield’s VAWT
  • Fluid Structural Interaction Analysis of Flexible Sails for Vertical Axis Wind Turbine.

Assessment

The taught modules 40%, The Group Project 20%, The Individual Research Project 40%

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the core modules and some optional modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Dynamics of Fluidic Energy Devices

Module Leader
  • Dr Taka Nishino
Aim

    To provide a theoretical and applied understanding of fluid mechanics and fluid loading on structures with an emphasis on the conceptual & preliminary design of wind, wave and tidal current renewable energy systems.

Syllabus

    Principles of fluid dynamics:

    • Properties of fluids: Control volumes & fluid elements, Continuity, Momentum & Energy equations, stream function & velocity potential, Bernoulli’s equation.
    • Flow structures: Boundary layer theory, laminar & turbulent flow, steady & unsteady flow, flow breakdown & separations, vortex formation & stability
    • Lifting flows: Circulation theory, Prandtl’s lifting-line theory, sources of drag,  aerofoil characteristics
    • Fluid loading on horizontal and vertical axis turbines

    Dynamics of floating bodies:

    • From simple hydrostatics to complex dynamic response in waves.
    • Hydrostatics of Floating Bodies; Buoyancy Forces and Stability, Initial stability, The wall sided formula and large angle stability, Stability losses, The Pressure Integration Technique
    • Fluid loading on offshore structures and Ocean Waves Theory: The Added Mass Concept, Froude Krylov Force, Linear wave theory, Wave loading (Diffraction Theory & Morison Equation),
    • Dynamics response of floating structures in waves: dynamic response analysis, application to floating bodies (buoys, semisub, TLP), effect of moorings

    Engineering performance models:

    • Blade Element Momentum theory, Pre- and Post-stall aerofoil characteristics, Dynamic stall models, Finite aspect ratio considerations
    • Turbine array theory, Blockage effect, Local and global flow characteristics, Array optimisation
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Explain how the wind, waves and tides are formed, factors that influence their distribution & predictability;
  • Review the fundamental equations for fluid behaviour, characterisation of flow structures and forces and moments acting on lifting bodies;
  • Evaluate and select the most appropriate engineering performance model to undertake the simulation of a practical problem and critically assess the solution.

Risk and Reliability Engineering

Module Leader
  • Dr Athanasios Kolios
Aim

    To introduce the principles of risk management and reliability engineering and solve relevant engineering problems through widely applied methods and tools.

Syllabus
    • Introduction and Fundamentals of Risk and Reliability Engineering
    • Risk Management Process
    • Statistics, Probabilities and Mathematics for Risk Analysis
    • Failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis (FMEA/FMECA)
    • Hazard and operability study (HAZOP) Analysis
    • Practical Session #1: Basic Statistics, FMEA/HAZOP
    • Qualitative Reliability Analysis (FTA/ETA)
    • Systems modelling using Reliability Block Diagrams
    • System Reliability through software
    • Practical Session #2: System modelling and Reliability
    • Quantitative Reliability Analysis, Introduction to MCS
    • Risk Control and Decision Support Systems, Failure Consequences
    • Introduction to Stochastic Modelling Using @Risk
    • Insurance and Certification of Engineering Applications
    • Practical Session #3: Stochastic Modelling using @Risk
    • Asset Integrity Management
    • Risk-Based Inspection and Reliability-Centred Maintenance
    • Reliability, Availability, Maintainability and Safety (RAMS) Analysis
    • Introduction to inspection and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM)
    • Case study of risk/reliability and criticality assessment
    • Full day workshop: “Wind turbine electromechanical assembly / Subsea Tie-back Manifold Reliability"
    • Revision Session.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a systematic knowledge of the fundamentals of risk management and reliability engineering and a critical awareness of their application on relevant engineering problems;
  • Evaluate and select appropriate techniques for risk analysis (qualitative and quantitative), failure consequences assessment, and methods for control/mitigation through decision support systems and other relevant methods/tools;
  • Assess and analyse appropriate approaches to the collection and modelling of data in the application of Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) methods;
  • Develop a critical and analytical approach to selection and application of relevant standards and asset integrity management concepts.

Structural Integrity

Module Leader
  • Dr Ali Mehmanparast
Aim

    To provide an understanding of pertinent issues concerning the use of engineering materials and practical tools for solving structural integrity and structural fitness-for-service problems.

Syllabus
    • Introduction & Structural Design Philosophies
    • Fatigue Crack Initiation
    • Fracture Mechanics (1) – Derivation of G and K
    • Fracture Mechanics (2) – LEFM and EPFM
    • Fracture Mechanics (3) – Evaluation of Fracture Mechanics Parameters; K and J
    • Fracture Toughness Testing and Analysis; KIC and JIC
    • Creep Deformation and Crack Growth
    • Non Destructive Testing Methods
    • Inspection Reliability
    • Defect Assessment, Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics of Welded Components
    • Fracture of Composites
    • Corrosion Engineering
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Assess fitness-for-service issues and propose appropriate structural integrity solutions.
  • Judge the current component life assessment procedures and distinguish their limitations in aspects of structural integrity.
  • Develop a critical and analytical approach towards the engineering aspects of structural integrity.
  • Be able to confidently assess the applicability of the tools of structural integrity to new problems and apply them appropriately.

Management for Technology

Module Leader
  • Stephen Carver
Aim

    The importance of technology leadership in driving the technical aspects of an organisations products, innovation, programmes, operations and strategy is paramount, especially in today’s turbulent commercial environment with its unprecedented pace of technological development.  Demand for ever more complex products and services has become the norm.  The challenge for today’s manager is to deal with uncertainty, to allow technological innovation and change to flourish but also to remain within planned parameters of performance.  Many organisations engaged with technological innovation struggle to find engineers with the right skills.  Specifically, engineers have extensive subject/discipline knowledge but do not understand management processes in organisational context.  In addition, STEM graduates often lack interpersonal skills.


Syllabus
    • Engineers and Technologists in organisations: The role of organisations and the challenges facing engineers and technologies.
    • People management: Understanding you. Understanding other people. Working in teams. Dealing with conflicts.
    • The Business Environment: Understanding the business environment; identifying key trends and their implications for the organisation.
    • Strategy and Marketing: Developing effective strategies; Focusing on the customer; building competitive advantage; The role of strategic assets.
    • Finance: Profit and loss accounts. Balance sheets. Cash flow forecasting.Project appraisal.
    • New product development: Commercialising technology. Market drivers. Time to market. Focusing technology. Concerns.
    • Business game: Working in teams (companies), students will set up and run a technology company and make decisions on investment, R&D funding, operations, marketing and sales strategy.
    • Negotiation: Preparation for Negotiations. Negotiation process. Win-Win solutions.
    • Presentation skills: Understanding your audience. Focusing your message. Successful presentations. Getting your message across.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Recognise the importance of teamwork in the performance and success of organisations with particular reference to commercialising technological innovation.
  • Operate as an effective team member, recognising the contribution of individuals within the team, and capable of developing team working skills in themselves and others to improve overall performance of a team.
  • Compare and evaluate the impact of the key functional areas (strategy, marketing and finance) on the commercial performance of an organisation, relevant to the manufacture of a product or provision of a technical service.
  • Design and deliver an effective presentation that justifies and supports any decisions or recommendations made.
  • Argue and defend their judgements through constructive communication and negotiating skills.

Engineering Stress Analysis: Theory and Simulations

Module Leader
  • Dr Ali Mehmanparast
Aim

    This module brings together theoretical and computational stress analysis through Finite Element simulations, allowing students to appreciate how the two disciplines interact in practice and what their strengths and limitations are. The examination of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for various practical applications (e.g. engineering components, composite structures, rotating disks, cracked geometries) in conjunction with relevant case studies will allow students to combine theoretical understanding with practical experience in order to develop their skills to model and analyse complex engineering problems.

Syllabus
    • Stress Analysis: Introduction to stress analysis of components and structures, Ductile and brittle materials, Tensile data analysis, Material properties, Isotropic/kinematic hardening, Dynamic strain aging, Complex stress and strain, Stress and strain transformation, Principal stresses, Maximum shear stress, Mohr’s circle, Constitutive stress-strain equations, Fracture and yield criteria, Constraint and triaxiality effects, Plane stress and plane strain conditions, Thin walled cylinder theory, Thick walled cylinder theory (Lame Equations), Compound cylinders, Plastic deformation of cylinders, Introduction to computational stress analysis.
    • Finite Element Analysis: Introduction to FEA, Types of elements, Integration points, Meshing, Mesh convergence, Visualisation, Results interpretation, Beam structures under static and dynamic loading, stress concentration in steel and composite plates, tubular assemblies, 2D and 3D modelling of solid structures, axisymmetry and symmetry boundary conditions, CS1: Stress and strain variation in a pressure vessel subjected to different loading conditions, CS2: Prediction and validation of the stress and strain fields ahead of the crack tip. (case studies are indicative).
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Develop a strong foundation on stress analysis and demonstrate the ability to analyse a range of structural problems.
  • Understand the fundamentals of Finite Element Analysis, be able to evaluate methodologies applied to the analysis of structural members (beams, plates, shells, struts), and critically evaluate the applicability and limitations of the methods and the ability to make use of original thought and judgement when approaching structural analysis.
  • Demonstrate an in-depth awareness of current practice through case studies of engineering problems.
  • Develop skills in using the most widely applied commercial finite element software package (ABAQUS) and some of its advanced functionalities.
  • Evaluate the importance of mesh sensitivity in finite element simulations.

Computational Fluid Dynamics for Renewable Energy

Module Leader
  • Dr Patrick Verdin
Aim

    To introduce the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and tools for modelling, simulating and analysing practical engineering problems with hands on experience using commercial software packages used in industry.

Syllabus
    • Introduction to CFD & thermo-fluids: Introduction to the physics of thermo-fluids. Governing equations (continuity, momentum, energy and species conservation) and state of the art Computational Fluid Dynamics including modelling, grid generation, simulation, and high performance computing.  Case study of an Industrial problem and the physical process that CFD can be used to analyse.
    • Computational Engineering Exercise: specification for a CFD simulation. Requirements for accurate analysis and validation for multi scale problems. Introduction to Turbulence & practical applications of Turbulence Models: Introduction to Turbulence and turbulent flows. Traditional turbulence modelling. 
    • Advanced Turbulence ModellingIntroduction to Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations and large-eddy simulation (LES).
    • Practical sessions: Offshore renewable energy problems (flow around wind and tidal turbines) will be solved employing the widely-used industrial flow solver software FLUENT.  These practical sessions will cover the entire CFD process including grid generation, flow solver, analysis, validation and visualisation.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Assemble and evaluate the different components of the CFD process.
  • Explain the governing equations for fluid flows and how to solve them computationally.
  • Compare and contrast various methods for simulating turbulent flows applicable to civil and mechanical engineering, especially offshore renewable energy applications such as wind turbines and tidal turbines.
  • Set up simulations and evaluate a practical problem using a commercial CFD package.
  • Design CFD modelling studies of renewable energy devices.

Power Electronics and Machines

Module Leader
  • Professor Patrick Luk
Aim

    To introduce and analyse electrical machines and power electronic systems which are essential for all modern electric power conversion applications including renewable energy systems, with particular focus on wind and photovoltaic power generation.

Syllabus

    Overview of renewable energy conversion:

    • Potential and limitations
    • The roles of electric machines and power electronics in renewable  energy conversion

    Transformer and Electric Machines:

    • Electromagnetic materials, electric and magnetic circuits
    • Transformer and Asynchronous Machine
    • DC and Synchronous AC machines

    Power Electronics, Power Converters, and Energy Storage:

    • Power electronic components and their characteristics
    • Current and voltage source converters
    • DC-AC and DC-DC voltage source converters
    • Switching strategies, Bang-Bang and Pulse Width Modulation techniques
    • Energy storage systems

    Modelling and Control of Electric Machines:

    • Permanent magnet synchronous machine types and their applications
    • Modeling of permanent magnet synchronous machines 
    • Control of permanent magnet synchronous machines

    Applications to Renewable Energy Systems:

    • Wind generator systems
      • Overview of electric machines used
      • Converter types and configurations
    • Marine generator systems
      • Overview of electric machines used
    • Converter types and configurations Photovoltaic generators 
      • General types of photovoltaic cells
      • PV configurations and integration
    • Smart Grid
      • General configuration of smart gird for renewable energy systems
      • Opportunities and challenges
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Analyse key design and operational parameters  of electrical machines
  • Formulate high level functions of power electronic systems including the switching strategies of power electronic devices  
  • Appraise critically  the characteristics of modern electric power conversion systems
  • Prepare and apply analytical techniques to perform simple performance prediction of electrical machine systems
  • Evaluate appropriate techniques for specified renewable energy applications

Testing and Routes to Certification

Module Leader
  • Dr Florent Trarieux
Aim

    To provide a theoretical, applied and experimental understanding of the main engineering fields involved in the design and the operation of hydrodynamic testing facilities (such as wave tanks, towing tanks and water circulation channels) and aerodynamic testing facilities (i.e. wind tunnels). 

Syllabus

    Hydrodynamic Testing: Overview of facilities and techniques for testing offshore renewable energy technologies with visit to the Cranfield Wave Tank Test facility including practical demonstrations.

    • Review of existing facilities worldwide and their capabilities
    • Theoretical background - Scaling Laws
    • Wave generation and absorption at model scale
    • Towing mechanisms
    • Water circulation systems
    • State of the art instrumentation & flow visualization

    Aerodynamic testing: Overview of facilities and techniques for testing wind turbine rotors with visits to the Cranfield Wind Tunnel facilities and Wind Turbine Test facility including practical demonstrations.

    • Wind Tunnels (model scaling & blockage constraints, model mounting systems & instrumentation)
    • Full-scale testing
    • Wind-speed monitoring

    Certification routes:

    • Verification procedures
    • Performance warranties.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the tools and techniques available for physical testing of wind, wave and tidal energy devices and their supporting structures.
  • Plan, manage a test campaign and set-up an experiment in a hydrodynamic test facility.
  • Analyse the limitations of reduced scale physical testing and assess the  consequences at full scale.
  • Identify the most common issues and regulatory requirements for certifying wind, wave and tidal energy devices in the UK.

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year and the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.

MSc Full-time £8,500
MSc Part-time £1,635 *
PgDip Full-time £6,500
PgDip Part-time £1,635 *
PgCert Full-time £3,250
PgCert Part-time £1,635 *
  • * The annual registration fee is quoted above and will be invoiced annually. An additional fee of £1,340 per module is also payable on receipt of invoice. 
  • ** Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments, up to a maximum of two payments per year; first payment on or before registration and the second payment six months after the course start date. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2018 and 31 July 2019.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.


MSc Full-time £19,000
MSc Part-time £19,000 **
PgDip Full-time £15,200
PgDip Part-time £15,200 **
PgCert Full-time £7,600
PgCert Part-time £11,310 **
  • * The annual registration fee is quoted above and will be invoiced annually. An additional fee of £1,340 per module is also payable on receipt of invoice. 
  • ** Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments, up to a maximum of two payments per year; first payment on or before registration and the second payment six months after the course start date. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2018 and 31 July 2019.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.


Funding Opportunities

To help students find and secure appropriate funding we have created a tool that allows you to search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder. 

Scholarships and bursaries are available to contribute towards fees, and/or living costs for graduates applying for full-time Masters courses in the themes of Water, Energy and Environment. Please see below for the specific funding that is available and the eligibility criteria.

The Cranfield Scholarship

We have a limited number of scholarships available for candidates from around the world applying for the 2017 intake. Scholarships are awarded to applicants who show both aptitude and ability for the subject they are applying. Find out more about the Cranfield Scholarship

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England

A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Santander MSc Scholarship

The Santander Scholarship at Cranfield University is worth £5,000 towards tuition fees for full-time master's courses. Check the scholarship page to find out if you are from an eligible Santander Universities programme country.

Chevening Scholarships

Chevening Scholarships are awarded to outstanding emerging leaders to pursue a one-year master’s at Cranfield university. The scholarship includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study. 

Commonwealth Scholarships for Developing Countries

Students from developing countries who would not otherwise be able to study in the UK can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship which includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Future Finance Student Loans

Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Erasmus+ Student Loans

This new loan scheme for EU students is offered by Future Finance and European Investment Fund and provides smart, flexible loans of up to £9,300.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS)

The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia)

Cranfield offers competitive scholarships for Mexican students in conjunction with Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia) in science, technology and engineering.

Delta Foundation Chevening Scholarships Taiwan

The Chevening/Delta Environmental Scholarship Scheme is designed to promote environmental awareness and increase future activity to tackle environmental issues, in particular climate change, by offering two joint scholarships for students from Taiwan.

Entry requirements

A first or second class UK Honours degree (or equivalent) in mathematics, physics or an engineering discipline. Other recognised professional qualifications or several years relevant industrial experience may be accepted as equivalent; subject to approval by the Course Director.

Applicants who do not fulfil the standard entry requirements can apply for the Pre-Masters programme, successful completion of which will qualify them for entry to this course for a second year of study.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. Our minimum requirements are as follows:

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Applicants who do not already meet the English language entry requirement for their chosen Cranfield course can apply to attend one of our Presessional English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses. We offer Winter/Spring and Summer programmes each year to offer holders.

Your career

The industry-led education makes our graduates some of the most desirable in the world for recruitment by companies competing in the energy sector. Graduates from this course will be equipped with the advanced interdisciplinary skills required to design, optimise and evaluate the technical and economic viability of renewable energy schemes. Indeed, these interdisciplinary skills are also necessary for graduates wishing to take a management career route in the renewable energy industry. 

Our graduates have been successful in securing employment in renewable energy consultancies and leading energy and petrochemical companies. Recent graduates are currently working at Shell, DNV, RES, and Mott MacDonald.