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Prepare for a rewarding career in offshore engineering 

This MSc will prepare you for a career in offshore renewable energy or traditional offshore oil and gas engineering. Cranfield’s strong track record in offshore renewable energy projects and close engagement with the oil and gas sector over the last 20 years will enable you to forge a successful and rewarding career in this rapidly developing discipline. With a choice of engineering or asset management study routes, this course will enable you to contribute to developing stable, secure and financially viable solutions to the fundamental energy challenges affecting society in the 21st century.

Overview

  • Start dateFull-time: October. Part-time: October
  • DurationOne year full-time, two-three years part-time
  • DeliveryTaught modules 40%, group project 20% (or dissertation for part-time students), and individual project 40%.
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time / Part-time
  • CampusCranfield campus

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for engineering, maths or science graduates who wish to develop a career in Offshore Engineering. It develops professional engineers and scientists with the multidisciplinary skills and ability to analyse current and future offshore energy engineering problems.

You gain the new skills needed across this fast developing sector, together with the fundamental engineering or management understanding necessary, for any application.


Your career

Graduates with an MSc in Offshore Engineering develop diverse and rewarding careers in a range of different industries including offshore renewables, oil & gas, aquaculture systems and beyond.

Successful students move on to roles in the challenging fields of offshore oil and gas exploration, underwater engineering, pipeline engineering, risk management in offshore and marine operations, and the emerging offshore renewable energy industry.

The international nature of such roles mean that career opportunities are not restricted to the domestic market; and due to our strong reputation and industrially relevant course content, Cranfield graduates are able develop careers around the world.

Graduates of this course have gone onto work in a range of roles, including:

  • Geotechnical Engineer at Fugro
  • Naval Architect at Eni
  • Hydraulics Engineer at Eiffage Génie Civil Marine
  • Offshore Company Representative at Temile Development Company
  • Subsea Project Engineer at Marine Platform Ltd
  • Engineer at Recycling Technologies

Cranfield Careers Service

Cranfield’s Career Service is dedicated to helping you meet your career aspirations. You will have access to career coaching and advice, CV development, interview practice, access to hundreds of available jobs via our Symplicity platform and opportunities to meet recruiting employers at our careers fairs. We will also work with you to identify suitable opportunities and support you in the job application process for up to three years after graduation.


Why this course?

Cranfield’s MSc in Offshore Engineering will equip you with the skills demanded by employers in this this fast developing sector, together with the fundamental engineering understanding necessary, whatever the application.

  • Choose between engineering or asset management routes, focusing on the detailed engineering aspects of offshore engineering or offshore asset management.
  • Access our impressive on-site pilot-scale facilities include gas turbines and high-pressure combustion rigs, a structural integrity laboratory and an ocean systems laboratory – many of which are unique to the UK higher education sector.
  • Study at a top 5 ranked UK university for mechanical, aeronautical and manufacturing engineering.
  • Develop your technology leadership capabilities with the world renowned Cranfield School of Management.
  • Participate in individual and group projects focused on your personal interests and career aspirations.

Informed by Industry

The Offshore Engineering MSc is closely aligned with industry to ensure that you are fully prepared for your career:

  • Close engagement with the offshore sector over the last 20 years has produced long-standing strategic partnerships with these sectors' most prominent players.
  • An Industrial Advisory Panel ensures that the course meets the current demands of employers, and includes representatives from Shell, the Society of Underwater Technology, ABS.
  • Our strategic links with industry ensure that all of the material taught on your course is relevant, timely and meets the needs of organisations competing within the energy sector.
  • Learn from lecturers with extensive, current experience of working with industry on solving real world offshore engineering challenges.
  • The Institution of Mechanical Engineers, ensuring professional recognition and relevance to employers, accredits the course.

Course details

The taught programme for the Offshore Engineering masters is generally delivered from October to February and is comprised of eight modules.

Students on the part-time programme will complete all of the modules based on a flexible schedule that will be agreed with the course director.

Water course structure diagram
 

Course delivery

Taught modules 40%, group project 20% (or dissertation for part-time students), and individual project 40%.

Group project

The group project is an applied, multidisciplinary, team-based activity. Often solving real-world, industry-based problems, students are provided with the opportunity to take responsibility for a consultancy-type project while working under academic supervision. Success is dependent on the integration of various activities and working within agreed objectives, deadlines and budgets. Transferable skills such as team work, self-reflection and clear communication are also developed.

Recent group projects include:

Individual project

The individual project is the chance for students to focus on an area of particular interest to them and their future career.  Students select the individual project in consultation with the Thesis Co-ordinator and their Course Director. These projects provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their ability to carry out independent research; think and work in an original way; contribute to knowledge; and overcome genuine problems in the offshore industry. Many of the projects are supported by external organisations.

Modules

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory and elective (where applicable) modules which are currently affiliated with this course. All modules are indicative only, and may be subject to change for your year of entry.


Course modules

Engineering route compulsory modules

Materials and Corrosion

Module Leader
  • Dr Joy Sumner
Aim

    To enable the student to understand the structure and properties of materials, their possible corrosion responses, and to apply this knowledge to specific applications.


Syllabus
    • Introduction to materials: atomic structure, crystal structure, imperfections, diffusion, mechanical properties, dislocations and strengthening mechanisms, phase diagrams, phase transformations, solidification, corrosion,
    • Introduction to common materials for structures including C-Mn ferrite-pearlite steels; stainless steels; composites; concrete; etc.  This sill include discussion of heat treatment effects on microstructure and hence mechanical properties,
    • Thermodynamics of Corrosion: Electrode reactions, potential.  Simple cells, electrochemical series, galvanic, series, Nernst equation, Common cathodic reactions, general corrosion, Pourbaix diagram,
    • Corrosion Kinetics: Polarisation diagrams, practical measurements, passivity,
    • Corrosion Mechanisms: Effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide, galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, mechanical interactions, microbial corrosion, corrosion of welds, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement and effects of H2S, High temperature corrosion,
    • Corrosion Control: Paints, cathodic protection, corrosion resistant alloys, corrosion monitoring, control by design.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Use the basic principles of material structures on a micro and macro scale, to propose expected microstructures and discuss the impact on mechanical performance and hence link processing of materials to their applications,
  • Justify the selection of specific materials for different applications (steels, stainless steels, non-ferrous alloys, polymers, composites, corrosion resistant alloys and concrete),
  • Discuss the application of codes and standards,
  • Distinguish between the main types of corrosion and discuss the conditions under which they can occur,
  • Apply the knowledge of the principles of corrosion to examples and to the evaluation of the factors that affect its rate and use this to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the principal methods of corrosion protection to select appropriate methods of corrosion control.

Risk and Reliability Engineering

Module Leader
  • Dr Mahmood Shafiee
Aim
    To introduce the principles of risk and reliability engineering and associated tools and methods to solve relevant engineering problems in industry.
Syllabus
    • Introduction and fundamentals of risk management and reliability engineering.
    • Failure distributions: how to analysis and interpret failure data, introduce the most commonly used discrete and continuous failure distributions (e.g. Poisson, Exponential, Weibull and Normal).
    • Risk management process: hazard identification, assessment, evaluation and mitigation (risk acceptance, reduction, ignorance, transfer).
    • Risk assessment techniques: risk matrix, Pareto analysis, fault tree analysis (FTA), event tree analysis (ETA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), hazard and operability study (HAZOP).
    • Reliability and availability analysis: system duty cycle, breakdown/shudown, MTTF/MTBF/MTTR, survival, failure/hazard rate.
    • Reliability analysis techniques: reliability block diagram (RBD), minimal cut-set (MCS), series and parallel configurations, k-out-of-n systems, active and passive redundancies.  
    • Introduction to structural reliability analysis: stress strength interference and limit state function, first-order / second-order reliability method (FORM/SORM), Damage accumulation and modelling of time-dependent reliability.
    • Identification of the role of inspection and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) in risk reduction and reliability improvement.
    • Introduction to maintainability and its various measures
    • Workshops and case studies: Work in groups to determine the risk and reliability of subsea production systems, power distribution networks, wind turbines, gas turbines, etc. 
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Identify and analyse the concepts and principals of risk and reliability engineering and their potential applications to different engineering problems;
  • Assess and analyse appropriate approaches to the collection and interpretation of data in the application of risk and reliability engineering methods;
  • Evaluate and select appropriate techniques and tools for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis and reliability assessment;
  • Analyse and evaluate failure distributions, failure likelihood and potential consequences, and develop solutions for control/mitigation of risks.

Engineering Stress Analysis: Theory and Simulations

Module Leader
  • Dr Ali Mehmanparast
Aim
    This module brings together theoretical and computational stress analysis through Finite Element simulations, allowing students to appreciate how the two disciplines interact in practice and what their strengths and limitations are. The examination of Finite Element Analysis (FEA) for various practical applications (e.g. engineering components, composite structures, rotating disks, cracked geometries) in conjunction with relevant case studies will allow students to combine theoretical understanding with practical experience in order to develop their skills to model and analyse complex engineering problems.
Syllabus
    • Stress Analysis: Introduction to stress analysis of components and structures, Ductile and brittle materials, Tensile data analysis, Material properties, Isotropic/kinematic hardening, Dynamic strain aging, Complex stress and strain, Stress and strain transformation, Principal stresses, Maximum shear stress, Mohr’s circle, Constitutive stress-strain equations, Fracture and yield criteria, Constraint and triaxiality effects, Plane stress and plane strain conditions, Thin walled cylinder theory, Thick walled cylinder theory (Lame Equations), Compound cylinders, Plastic deformation of cylinders, Introduction to computational stress analysis.
    • Finite Element Analysis: Introduction to FEA, Types of elements, Integration points, Meshing, Mesh convergence, Visualisation, Results interpretation, Beam structures under static and dynamic loading, stress concentration in steel and composite plates, tubular assemblies, 2D and 3D modelling of solid structures, axisymmetry and symmetry boundary conditions, CS1: Stress and strain variation in a pressure vessel subjected to different loading conditions, CS2: Prediction and validation of the stress and strain fields ahead of the crack tip. (case studies are indicative).
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Develop a strong foundation on stress analysis and demonstrate the ability to analyse a range of structural problems.
  • Explain the fundamentals of Finite Element Analysis, be able to evaluate methodologies applied to the analysis of structural members (beams, plates, shells, struts), and critically evaluate the applicability and limitations of the methods and the ability to make use of original thought and judgement when approaching structural analysis.
  • Provide an in-depth explanation of current practice through case studies of engineering problems.
  • Use the most widely applied commercial finite element software package (ABAQUS) and some of its advanced functionalities.
  • Evaluate the importance of mesh sensitivity in finite element simulations.


Applied Materials and Corrosion

Module Leader
  • Dr Joy Sumner
Aim

    To provide a knowledge and understanding of the corrosion processes that occur on structural materials and the impact on their mechanical performance.


Syllabus
    • Mechanical testing - in particular development of stress strain curves,
    • Corrosion monitoring:  using electro-chemical methodologies, and electron microscopy,
    • Corrosion Mechanisms: including effects of underlying material composition and processing,galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, mechanical interactions, microbial corrosion, corrosion of welds, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement and effects of H2S, High temperature corrosion,
    • Corrosion Control: Paints, cathodic protection, corrosion resistant alloys, corrosion monitoring, control by design.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Evaluate the impact of corrosion on the mechanical responses of structural materials and the impact of inhibition techniques on extending life,
  • Critically evaluate analysis and corrosion monitoring techniques to select appropriate methodologies,
  • Use an understanding of materials and processing to recommend alternative engineering solutions,
  • Discuss the role of codes and standards.

Computational Fluid Dynamics for Renewable Energy

Module Leader
  • Dr Patrick Verdin
Aim
    To introduce the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques and tools for modelling, simulating and analysing practical engineering problems related to renewable energy, with hands on experience using commercial software packages used in industry.
Syllabus
  • Introduction to CFD & thermo-fluids: Introduction to the physics of thermo-fluids. Governing equations (continuity, momentum, energy and species conservation) and state of the art Computational Fluid Dynamics including modelling, grid generation, simulation, and high performance computing.  Case study of an Industrial problem and the physical processes where CFD can be used.
  • Computational Engineering Exercise: specification for a CFD simulation. Requirements for accurate analysis and validation for multi scale problems. Introduction to Turbulence & practical applications of Turbulence Models: Introduction to Turbulence and turbulent flows. Traditional turbulence modelling. 
  • Advanced Turbulence ModellingIntroduction to Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) simulations and large-eddy simulation (LES).
  • Practical sessions: Offshore renewable energy problems (flow around wind and tidal turbines) will be solved employing the widely-used industrial flow solver software FLUENT.  These practical sessions will cover the entire CFD process including grid generation, flow solver, analysis, validation and visualisation.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Assemble and evaluate the different components of the CFD process.
  • Explain the governing equations for fluid flows and how to solve them computationally.
  • Compare and contrast various methods for simulating turbulent flows applicable to civil and mechanical engineering, especially offshore renewable energy applications such as wind turbines and tidal turbines.
  • Set up simulations and evaluate a practical problem using a commercial CFD package.
  • Design CFD modelling studies of renewable energy devices.

Structural Integrity

Module Leader
  • Dr Ali Mehmanparast
Aim
    To provide an understanding of pertinent issues concerning the use of engineering materials and practical tools for solving structural integrity and structural fitness-for-service problems.
Syllabus
    • Introduction & Structural Design Philosophies
    • Fatigue Crack Initiation
    • Fracture Mechanics (1) – Derivation of G and K
    • Fracture Mechanics (2) – LEFM and EPFM
    • Fracture Mechanics (3) – Evaluation of Fracture Mechanics Parameters; K and J
    • Fracture Toughness Testing and Analysis; KIC and JIC
    • Creep Deformation and Crack Growth
    • Non Destructive Testing Methods
    • Inspection Reliability
    • Defect Assessment, Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics of Welded Components
    • Fracture of Composites
    • Corrosion Engineering
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Assess fitness-for-service issues and propose appropriate structural integrity solutions.
  • Judge the current component life assessment procedures and distinguish their limitations in aspects of structural integrity.
  • Develop a critical and analytical approach towards the engineering aspects of structural integrity.
  • Be able to confidently assess the applicability of the tools of structural integrity to new problems and apply them appropriately.

Energy Systems Case Studies

Module Leader
  • Dr Xin Zhang
Aim
    The module aims to provide the students with a deep understanding of the truly multidisciplinary nature of a real industrial project.  Using a relevant case study, the scientific and technical concepts learned during the previous modules will be brought together and used to execute the analysis of the case study.
Syllabus
    • Work flow definition: setting up the single aspects to be considered, the logical order, and the interfaces.
    • Design of an appropriate analysis toolkit specific to the case study
    • Development of a management or maintenance framework for the case study
    • Multi-criteria decision analysis [MDCA] applied to energy technologies to identify the best available technology. 
    • Energy technologies and systems: understanding the development and scaling/design of the technologies by applying an understanding of the available resources in the assigned location;
    • Public engagement strategies and the planning process involved in developing energy technologies.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate available technological options, and select the most appropriate method for determining the best available technology [BAT] for the specific case study;
  • Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a group to achieve the stated requirements of the module brief;
  • Demonstrate the ability to organise the single-discipline activities in a logical workflow, and to define the interfaces between them, designing an overall multidisciplinary approach for the specific case study.

Management for Technology

Aim
    The importance of technology leadership in driving the technical aspects of an organisations products, innovation, programmes, operations and strategy is paramount, especially in today’s turbulent commercial environment with its unprecedented pace of technological development. Demand for ever more complex products and services has become the norm.  The challenge for today’s manager is to deal with uncertainty, to allow technological innovation and change to flourish but also to remain within planned parameters of performance.  Many organisations engaged with technological innovation struggle to find engineers with the right skills.  Specifically, engineers have extensive subject/discipline knowledge but do not understand management processes in organisational context.  In addition, STEM graduates often lack interpersonal skills.
Syllabus
    • Engineers and Technologists in organisations: The role of organisations and the challenges facing engineers and technologies.
    • People management: Understanding you. Understanding other people. Working in teams. Dealing with conflicts.
    • The Business Environment: Understanding the business environment; identifying key trends and their implications for the organisation.
    • Strategy and Marketing: Developing effective strategies; Focusing on the customer; building competitive advantage; The role of strategic assets.
    • Finance: Profit and loss accounts. Balance sheets. Cash flow forecasting.Project appraisal.
    • New product development: Commercialising technology. Market drivers. Time to market. Focusing technology. Concerns.
    • Business game: Working in teams (companies), students will set up and run a technology company and make decisions on investment, R&D funding, operations, marketing and sales strategy.
    • Negotiation: Preparation for Negotiations. Negotiation process. Win-Win solutions.
    • Presentation skills: Understanding your audience. Focusing your message. Successful presentations. Getting your message across.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Recognise the importance of teamwork in the performance and success of organisations with particular reference to commercialising technological innovation.
  • Operate as an effective team member, recognising the contribution of individuals within the team, and capable of developing team working skills in themselves and others to improve the overall performance of a team.
  • Compare and evaluate the impact of the key functional areas (strategy, marketing and finance) on the commercial performance of an organisation, relevant to the manufacture of a product or provision of a technical service.
  • Design and deliver an effective presentation that justifies and supports any decisions or recommendations made
  • Argue and defend their judgements through constructive communication and negotiating skills.

Management route compulsory modules

Materials and Corrosion

Module Leader
  • Dr Joy Sumner
Aim

    To enable the student to understand the structure and properties of materials, their possible corrosion responses, and to apply this knowledge to specific applications.


Syllabus
    • Introduction to materials: atomic structure, crystal structure, imperfections, diffusion, mechanical properties, dislocations and strengthening mechanisms, phase diagrams, phase transformations, solidification, corrosion,
    • Introduction to common materials for structures including C-Mn ferrite-pearlite steels; stainless steels; composites; concrete; etc.  This sill include discussion of heat treatment effects on microstructure and hence mechanical properties,
    • Thermodynamics of Corrosion: Electrode reactions, potential.  Simple cells, electrochemical series, galvanic, series, Nernst equation, Common cathodic reactions, general corrosion, Pourbaix diagram,
    • Corrosion Kinetics: Polarisation diagrams, practical measurements, passivity,
    • Corrosion Mechanisms: Effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide, galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, mechanical interactions, microbial corrosion, corrosion of welds, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement and effects of H2S, High temperature corrosion,
    • Corrosion Control: Paints, cathodic protection, corrosion resistant alloys, corrosion monitoring, control by design.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Use the basic principles of material structures on a micro and macro scale, to propose expected microstructures and discuss the impact on mechanical performance and hence link processing of materials to their applications,
  • Justify the selection of specific materials for different applications (steels, stainless steels, non-ferrous alloys, polymers, composites, corrosion resistant alloys and concrete),
  • Discuss the application of codes and standards,
  • Distinguish between the main types of corrosion and discuss the conditions under which they can occur,
  • Apply the knowledge of the principles of corrosion to examples and to the evaluation of the factors that affect its rate and use this to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the principal methods of corrosion protection to select appropriate methods of corrosion control.

Risk and Reliability Engineering

Module Leader
  • Dr Mahmood Shafiee
Aim
    To introduce the principles of risk and reliability engineering and associated tools and methods to solve relevant engineering problems in industry.
Syllabus
    • Introduction and fundamentals of risk management and reliability engineering.
    • Failure distributions: how to analysis and interpret failure data, introduce the most commonly used discrete and continuous failure distributions (e.g. Poisson, Exponential, Weibull and Normal).
    • Risk management process: hazard identification, assessment, evaluation and mitigation (risk acceptance, reduction, ignorance, transfer).
    • Risk assessment techniques: risk matrix, Pareto analysis, fault tree analysis (FTA), event tree analysis (ETA), failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA), failure mode, effects and criticality analysis (FMECA), hazard and operability study (HAZOP).
    • Reliability and availability analysis: system duty cycle, breakdown/shudown, MTTF/MTBF/MTTR, survival, failure/hazard rate.
    • Reliability analysis techniques: reliability block diagram (RBD), minimal cut-set (MCS), series and parallel configurations, k-out-of-n systems, active and passive redundancies.  
    • Introduction to structural reliability analysis: stress strength interference and limit state function, first-order / second-order reliability method (FORM/SORM), Damage accumulation and modelling of time-dependent reliability.
    • Identification of the role of inspection and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) in risk reduction and reliability improvement.
    • Introduction to maintainability and its various measures
    • Workshops and case studies: Work in groups to determine the risk and reliability of subsea production systems, power distribution networks, wind turbines, gas turbines, etc. 
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Identify and analyse the concepts and principals of risk and reliability engineering and their potential applications to different engineering problems;
  • Assess and analyse appropriate approaches to the collection and interpretation of data in the application of risk and reliability engineering methods;
  • Evaluate and select appropriate techniques and tools for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis and reliability assessment;
  • Analyse and evaluate failure distributions, failure likelihood and potential consequences, and develop solutions for control/mitigation of risks.

Energy Economics and Policy

Module Leader
  • Dr Nazmiye Ozkan
Aim
    In the context of rising household energy demands, concerns for energy security, threat of climate change, and uncertainties in the price of energy (the so-called ‘energy trilemma’) require transformation of the ways in which energy is produced, delivered and consumed. Both for the developed and developing economies challenges stem from meeting increasing electricity demands from more intermittent renewable resources. This module covers a variety of theoretical and empirical topics related to energy demand, energy supply, energy prices, renewable vs depletable resources and environmental consequences of energy consumption and production, all from an economic perspective. It will demonstrate how key economic principles are used in various energy-environment models to inform energy and climate policy.

Syllabus
    • Key concepts and main approaches in economic analysis of energy systems,
    • Different approaches to economic modelling of energy and environment interactions,
    • Energy efficiency and renewable energy policies,
    • Regulation and governance,
    • Energy policy theory and practice,
    • Economics of energy and ancillary services market.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the purpose of energy policy, as well as the range of policy strategies and instruments,
  • Explain how economic principles govern energy markets and the economics of energy supply,
  • Evaluate the approaches for energy market regulation,
  • Critically evaluate different approaches for the modelling of energy and environment interactions,
  • Identify and evaluate the key issues facing the energy sector (i.e. smart technologies, energy security).

Applied Materials and Corrosion

Module Leader
  • Dr Joy Sumner
Aim

    To provide a knowledge and understanding of the corrosion processes that occur on structural materials and the impact on their mechanical performance.


Syllabus
    • Mechanical testing - in particular development of stress strain curves,
    • Corrosion monitoring:  using electro-chemical methodologies, and electron microscopy,
    • Corrosion Mechanisms: including effects of underlying material composition and processing,galvanic corrosion, pitting and crevice corrosion, mechanical interactions, microbial corrosion, corrosion of welds, stress corrosion cracking, hydrogen embrittlement and effects of H2S, High temperature corrosion,
    • Corrosion Control: Paints, cathodic protection, corrosion resistant alloys, corrosion monitoring, control by design.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Evaluate the impact of corrosion on the mechanical responses of structural materials and the impact of inhibition techniques on extending life,
  • Critically evaluate analysis and corrosion monitoring techniques to select appropriate methodologies,
  • Use an understanding of materials and processing to recommend alternative engineering solutions,
  • Discuss the role of codes and standards.

Health Safety Security and Environment

Module Leader
  • Dr Gill Drew
Aim
    Health, safety, security and the environment are all key considerations when working in the offshore and renewable energy sectors. These 4 topics are also broad and cover many aspects.  Within the scope of a single module, it is not possible to cover all 4 aspects in depth. The module is therefore designed to provide students with the competencies to assess and evaluate the relevant international standards as well as the legislation and regulatory requirements. There is a strong focus on the use of case studies to provide examples of how standards and legislation are implemented in practice.
Syllabus
    • Introduction to the International Standards associated with HSSE, including the ISO 14000 family 
    • Environmental legislation and voluntary standards.
    • Environmental impacts and prevention
    • Occupational health and safety legislation and duty of care
    • Human reliability analysis and accident causation: Major accident sequences, risk perception and control of risk human reliability assessment tools, HEART and THERP.
    • Offshore safety case and formal safety assessments: regulatory regime,  safety case requirements, types of study, scenario development, examples of use of QRA methods, consequence analysis, vulnerability of essential systems, smoke and gas ingress, evacuation escape and rescue and typical output.
    • Review of major offshore accidents: Sea Gem, Alexander Keilland, Star Canopus and Piper Alpha disaster. 
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Critique the ISO standards relevant to occupational health, safety and the environment, within the context of offshore and renewable energy.
  • Differentiate between voluntary requirements and legal or regulatory requirements for health and safety, and the environment
  • Evaluate the likely environmental impacts resulting from offshore and renewable energy industries
  • Design an appropriate health and safety policy for a particular offshore environment or renewable energy technology 

Advanced Maintenance Engineering and Asset Management

Module Leader
  • Dr Mahmood Shafiee
Aim
    To provide the knowledge and skills necessary to design advanced maintenance, monitoring and asset management strategies for complex engineering systems through the lifecycle.
Syllabus
    • Introduction: Asset management, overall equipment effectiveness (OEE), asset productivity.
    • Asset integrity: Asset integrity management (AIM), Risk-based integrity, through-life engineering.
    • Maintenance engineering: Maintenance regimes, reactive vs. proactive maintenance; Age and block maintenance, reliability-centred maintenance (RCM), risk-based maintenance (RBM), total productive maintenance (TPM), world-class maintenance (WCMain).
    • Fault diagnosis and prognosis: Fault detection and failure location; root-cause analysis (RCA), Common-cause analysis (CCA), Condition-based maintenance (CBM), predictive maintenance (PdM), prognostics.
    • Maintenance modelling, planning, scheduling, and optimization.
    • Reliability data analysis: types and sources of reliability data, data collection, data cleansing, data accuracy and precision, model fitting, big-data, incomplete data, redundant data, not-detailed data.
    • Applications of Monte-Carlo Simulation (MCS) and Bayesian Network (BN) in system reliability and availability assessment.
    • Probability of failure, Cost of failure, and risk of failure in networked infrastructures.
    • System’s life-cycle: Life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, whole-life costing, how to identify cost drivers of system operation.
    • Robotic and autonomous maintenance; overview of the capabilities and limitations of commercially available aerial and underwater remote and autonomous systems, and how these systems are integrated in the overall maintenance strategy.
    • Reliability of condition monitoring technologies and sensors, Probability of Detection (POD) and Probability of Sizing (POS).
    • Decommissioning vs. life extension.
    • Warranty and service contracts analysis: guarantees, warranties, extended warranties, service contracts, and maintenance outsourcing with several examples from different industries.
    • Workshops and case studies: Work in groups to analyse the reliability, availability and maintainability of various offshore systems and components.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Identify and recognise the asset management best practices and advanced maintenance strategies for engineering systems in different industries.
  • Analyse key and fundamental aspects of system’s life-cycle and understand the financial implications involved with assessing the maintenance and risk factors.
  • Differentiate between classical maintenance strategies (run-to-failure, time-based) and novel maintenance strategies (e.g. risk/reliability centred maintenance, predictive and diagnostic maintenance, predictive maintenance) and evaluate their main advantages and limitations
  • Determine the concept and utilise applications of Monte-Carlo Simulation (MSC), Bayesian Network (BN) in system reliability and availability assessment.
  • Evaluate the capabilities and limitations of robotic and autonomous maintenance systems, and outline the future trends and impacts on the maintenance strategy
  • Design an appropriate maintenance strategy for complex engineering systems, detailing how the strategy is embedded throughout the asset life-cycle.

Energy Systems Case Studies

Module Leader
  • Dr Xin Zhang
Aim
    The module aims to provide the students with a deep understanding of the truly multidisciplinary nature of a real industrial project.  Using a relevant case study, the scientific and technical concepts learned during the previous modules will be brought together and used to execute the analysis of the case study.
Syllabus
    • Work flow definition: setting up the single aspects to be considered, the logical order, and the interfaces.
    • Design of an appropriate analysis toolkit specific to the case study
    • Development of a management or maintenance framework for the case study
    • Multi-criteria decision analysis [MDCA] applied to energy technologies to identify the best available technology. 
    • Energy technologies and systems: understanding the development and scaling/design of the technologies by applying an understanding of the available resources in the assigned location;
    • Public engagement strategies and the planning process involved in developing energy technologies.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate available technological options, and select the most appropriate method for determining the best available technology [BAT] for the specific case study;
  • Demonstrate the ability to work as part of a group to achieve the stated requirements of the module brief;
  • Demonstrate the ability to organise the single-discipline activities in a logical workflow, and to define the interfaces between them, designing an overall multidisciplinary approach for the specific case study.

Management for Technology

Aim
    The importance of technology leadership in driving the technical aspects of an organisations products, innovation, programmes, operations and strategy is paramount, especially in today’s turbulent commercial environment with its unprecedented pace of technological development. Demand for ever more complex products and services has become the norm.  The challenge for today’s manager is to deal with uncertainty, to allow technological innovation and change to flourish but also to remain within planned parameters of performance.  Many organisations engaged with technological innovation struggle to find engineers with the right skills.  Specifically, engineers have extensive subject/discipline knowledge but do not understand management processes in organisational context.  In addition, STEM graduates often lack interpersonal skills.
Syllabus
    • Engineers and Technologists in organisations: The role of organisations and the challenges facing engineers and technologies.
    • People management: Understanding you. Understanding other people. Working in teams. Dealing with conflicts.
    • The Business Environment: Understanding the business environment; identifying key trends and their implications for the organisation.
    • Strategy and Marketing: Developing effective strategies; Focusing on the customer; building competitive advantage; The role of strategic assets.
    • Finance: Profit and loss accounts. Balance sheets. Cash flow forecasting.Project appraisal.
    • New product development: Commercialising technology. Market drivers. Time to market. Focusing technology. Concerns.
    • Business game: Working in teams (companies), students will set up and run a technology company and make decisions on investment, R&D funding, operations, marketing and sales strategy.
    • Negotiation: Preparation for Negotiations. Negotiation process. Win-Win solutions.
    • Presentation skills: Understanding your audience. Focusing your message. Successful presentations. Getting your message across.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Recognise the importance of teamwork in the performance and success of organisations with particular reference to commercialising technological innovation.
  • Operate as an effective team member, recognising the contribution of individuals within the team, and capable of developing team working skills in themselves and others to improve the overall performance of a team.
  • Compare and evaluate the impact of the key functional areas (strategy, marketing and finance) on the commercial performance of an organisation, relevant to the manufacture of a product or provision of a technical service.
  • Design and deliver an effective presentation that justifies and supports any decisions or recommendations made
  • Argue and defend their judgements through constructive communication and negotiating skills.

Accreditation

This MSc degree is accredited by the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE).

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How to apply

Online application form. UK students are normally expected to attend an interview and financial support is best discussed at this time. Overseas and EU students may be interviewed by telephone.