The MSc in Digital  Forensics is currently suspended for 2018/19.  The course will be undergoing a review during 2018/19 and subject to approval will re-launch with a new syllabus in 2019/20.  This webpage will be updated in due course but if you want to be advised when that happens please submit an enquiry and we will advise you when the page is updated.

Delivered by the Forensic Institute this course focuses on providing the knowledge and skills required to conduct comprehensive forensic examinations of digital devices. Lectures are delivered by Digital Forensic practitioners and academics throughout the course, with guest lecturers coming from both law enforcement and private companies.

Important information

Decisions are currently being made regarding whether this course (and/or some of its modules) will be taught at Shrivenham or Cranfield in the 2019-2020 academic year and beyond.  The information on this page is up-to-date, but any changes will be sent to those who have already enquired or applied as soon as further details are available.

Overview

  • Start dateOctober
  • DurationMSc: 11 months full-time, up to three years part-time. Part-time PgCert - two years, Part-time PgDip - two years
  • DeliveryThe assessments on this course are a mixture of written and practical exams, oral presentations, coursework assignments and (MSc only) a thesis.
  • QualificationMSc, MSc by Research, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time / Part-time
  • CampusShrivenham or Cranfield (to be confirmed)

Who is it for?

This course is highly practical and technical in both delivery and assessment. It is designed to enable participants to conduct comprehensive forensic computing examinations and cutting-edge digital forensic research.

The full-time course is ideally suited to recent graduates in a related subject such as Computer Science or Forensic Science who wish to specialise in Digital Forensics. It is also suitable for those who have recently completed a BSc in Computer Forensics, Digital Forensics, Cybercrime Forensics or a related subject, who wish to deepen their knowledge, improve their skills and increase their employability in a very competitive market. 

The part-time course is more suited to those already in full-time employment, such as law enforcement officers, government staff, security consultants, accountancy and banking organisations, corporate security personnel and members of associated agencies in both the UK and overseas. This programme could lead to a new career or promotion with an existing employer.

Why this course?

Cranfield University has become the first university in the UK to receive full certification from the UK Government Communications Headquarters, GCHQ, for the MSc Digital Forensics course.

This MSc is specifically designed to provide you with the practical skills, knowledge base and research skills to work as a digital forensics practitioner.

This course is highly practical and technical in both delivery and assessment. It is designed to enable participants to conduct comprehensive forensic computing examinations and cutting-edge digital forensic research.

Your teaching team

 

Accreditation

Cranfield University has become the first university for digital forensics in the UK to receive full certification from the UK Government Communications Headquarters, GCHQ, for the MSc Digital Forensics course.

Certified Education logo

 

Course details

Students will complete a number of taught modules each with theoretical and practical elements and, for the MSc, an individual research project.

Individual project

The individual project will involve academic research in a specific area of digital forensics. The student will produce a substantial dissertation detailing their investigation and findings. Students are pushed to produce high quality, novel research during this period, and research outcomes are often at the cutting edge of the subject.

Assessment

The assessments on this course are a mixture of written and practical exams, oral presentations, coursework assignments and (MSc only) a thesis.

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory modules and (where applicable) some elective modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Investigation and Evidence Collection

Module Leader
  • Dr Hannah Moore
Aim
    The module provides an understanding of the core responsibilities of evidence recording and collection at the crime scene, both in general and specifically related to operational constraints of a UK investigative context. You will also understand the operation of forensic and police investigators within the context of a major investigation.
Syllabus
    Construction of the forensic strategy
    Evidence selection and collection
    Scene photography
    Digital photography
    Sample integrity and contamination issues
    Assessment of evidence
    Packaging and transportation
    Scene reporting
    Handling intelligence – assessment and communication
     

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 analyse and evaluate various different strategies of major scene investigation to consider the various effects of different approaches,
 appraise the range of evidence collection and investigation techniques available to the crime scene investigator,
 describe and evaluate the relative merits of the range of systematic crime scene procedures vital to successful investigations,
 evaluate which of these procedures are appropriate to a particular crime scene and apply these procedures appropriately during a crime scene exercise,
 generate a crime scene report which objectively critiques the methodologies used and draws justified conclusions appropriate for the evidence,
 transfer theoretical and practical knowledge of evidence identification, recording and retrieval into the various roles of forensic specialists.

 

 


Reasoning for Forensic Science

Module Leader
  • Professor Peter Zioupos
Aim

    To provide an understanding and experience of the disciplines underpinning critical evaluation of quantitative information applied within the Forensic Sciences.

Syllabus
    • Experimental design
    • Interpretation and assessment
    • Effective framing & rebutting of arguments
    • Problem solving
    • Evidential types
    • Use of relevant statistics for design & interpretation
    • Courtroom statistics

    The syllabus will follow the general course of a generic investigative process from the appropriate framing of a question to the critical interpretation of data and information. The appropriate use of data in well-constructed arguments will be considered in order to distinguish between fact, opinion and speculation.  Intellectual rigour will be challenged, and the ability to identify weakness in argument will be developed. Data will be examined for reliability and reproducibility with a focus on the distinct features of forensically related data.  Appropriate use of descriptive and hypothesis testing statistics will be practiced and the ‘prosecutor’s fallacy’ explored. Bayes’ Theorem will be considered and rehearsed through case studies.  


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 Recognise the fundamental features of effective experimental design
 Explain how confidence may be secured through effective reliability and reproducibility assessments
 Frame and defend an effective argument concerning quantitative information
 Apply appropriate statistics to forensic evidence for analysis and interpretation
 Explain the statistical processes to the layman
 Apply Bayes’ Theorem to forensic evidence

 

 


Forensic Computing Foundations

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    The aim of this module is to provide students with the skills to recover forensic evidence from digital devices.

Syllabus

    • Digital data storage, formats, structures, and interpretation
    • Hard disk structures and data retrieval process
    • Disk partitioning
    • File system analysis
    • Microsoft Windows operating system forensic artefacts,
    • Data Carving
    • Digital investigation strategies and processes, e.g. keyword searching, file carving etc.
    • Writing notes and reports

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

• Construct an overall digital forensic workflow that satisfies the requirements of evidential admissibility
• Construct, justify, and carry out a forensically sound process for disk imaging
• Conduct detailed manual forensic reconstruction of stored data (e.g. disk partition, file system, operating system, and application structures) including artefacts that may be unreadable by standard forensic tools
• Given a set of instructions for a case, construct an examination strategy to recover admissible digital evidence, and given a disk image, carry out that strategy to locate and extract digital evidence
• Produce appropriate documentation to accompany a digital forensic examination, including notes, statements and reports

Internet Forensics

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    This module will enable students to develop the necessary knowledge and skills for the recovery of admissible evidence from computers which have been used to access or exchange data across the Internet.



Syllabus
    Internet history, including the role of Internet authorities and registries,
     web browser architectures and data,
    SQLite database binary analysis and query structure,
    ESE and index.dat data storage,
     social network artefacts,
     email,
    Internet-specific crime.
Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

explain the function and operation of common Internet browser components,
interpret evidence recovered from the use of web browsers,
debate the attribution and reliability issues of Internet-derived evidence,
recover evidence from Internet transactions.
 

Courtroom Skills

Module Leader
  • Professor Peter Zioupos
Aim

    The module will provide an understanding of the role and responsibilities of expert witnesses in domestic and international criminal and civil cases and how they can present their evidence to the court effectively. You will also apply knowledge gained in previous modules to strengthen arguments presented in expert witness reports.

Syllabus
    Role and legal responsibilities of the forensic expert
    Civil and criminal procedure rules
    Excellence in report and statement writing
    Presentation of evidence in court
    Preparation for examination-in-chief and cross-examination.
     
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

define the role and responsibilities of the expert witness,
construct an effective expert witness report,
develop the skills to present oral evidence in court effectively and respond successfully to cross-examination.

 

 

Digital Forensics Project

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    The aim of the project is to give the student an opportunity to solve a practical forensic computing problem using appropriate theory, concepts, methods, processes, tools and skills gained during the module study phase.

     


Syllabus

    Regular meetings as agreed with tutor (16 hours before and at the start of the project), face-to-face contact and use of electronic tools as required.

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

demonstrate knowledge and understanding of essential facts, concepts, principles, theories and techniques relating to a specific area of forensic computing,
describe their work in a clear, well-presented dissertation,
show a structured and logical approach to their research,
demonstrate critical reflection and analysis of their research,
combine information from different sources, evaluating the value of the source,
demonstrate successful project management skills,
describe the background of the project, justify the approach used and present the results, at an oral examination.
 

Elective modules
A selection of modules from the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Digital Crime and Investigation

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    The aim of this module is to develop knowledge and understanding of the processes involved in the investigation of digital crime. These include the investigation of crime, the seizure of digital evidence, the examination of seized devices, the construction of reports and knowledge of relevant law.


Syllabus
    Background and introduction to digital forensic science
    Investigation of digital crime
    Planning and executing a search and seizure operation in the context of a digital crime based investigation
    Introduction to the tools and techniques used to examine digital evidence
    Reports and statements
    Relevant UK and European law
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 evaluate the impact of key concepts in digital forensic science and related legislation on the forensic workflow,
 create an effective search and seizure plan for a digital investigation,
 conduct a simple digital forensic examination,
 construct an appropriate report in respect of a digital crime investigation and examination,
 apply knowledge to act as a source of assistance and information in relation to digital evidence and crime.

 

 

Network Forensics

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    This module will enable students to develop the necessary knowledge and skills for the recovery and interpretation of admissible evidence from computers which are, or have been, connected to a network.


Syllabus
    • Seizure planning for different networks types,
    • local area network (LAN) technologies and protocols,
    • building a network,
    • wireless network analysis,
    • mapping a suspect network,
    • recovering server and client artefacts,
    • remote access.
     
     

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 identify potential sources of admissible evidence on a network of computers,
 explain the function of common network devices and protocols,
 formulate a strategy for the recovery of evidence from any specific network,
• apply appropriate methods for the recovery and analysis of evidence from a networked computer.

 

 

Advanced Forensic Computing

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    The aim of this module is to develop knowledge and understanding of advanced forensic computing techniques and to acquire the skills to apply these successfully.

Syllabus

      • Forensic analysis of the registry and its binary format
      • Structure and analysis of optical media disk formats
      • Virtual machine forensics
      • Forensic analysis of dynamic disks, spanned disks, striped volumes
      • Approaches to anti forensic techniques
      • Forensically exploiting operating system indexes
      • Forensic analysis of volume shadow copies
      • Forensic analysis of recently introduced features in Windows

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

  • Compare and identify the raw data formats used on optical media and artefacts created during their creation

  • Evaluate anti-forensic methods

  • Apply a range of techniques to extract forensic evidence of data or system usage which is otherwise inaccessible

  • Extract and interpret information from complex binary artefacts on a system

  • Trace and interpret areas of the registry from which useful forensic material is likely to be found

  • Create and run Virtual Machines for both previewing and experimentation

Programming for Digital Forensics

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    The aim of this module is to provide the student with the programming skills required to write specific programs to complement existing digital forensics software.



Syllabus
    Introduction to programming concepts,
    development environments,
    software testing,
    data types,
    operators,
    containers,
    string handling,
    sequences and Mappings,
    conditionals,
    loops,
    file handling,
    functions,
    exception Handling.

    Selected Python Modules:
    •  OS module,
    •  hashlib module,
    •  struct module,
    •  regular expressions module,
    •  subprocess module,
    •  SQLite3 module,
      logging module.
     
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 demonstrate a disciplined approach to forensic software development,
 design a programmatic solution for a problem in a digital forensics context ,
 implement a programmatic solution for a problem in digital forensics,
 construct, implement and document an appropriate test strategy for a programmatic solution to a digital forensics problem,
 construct appropriate supporting documentation for a program that performs a digital forensics task,
 justify design decisions and implementation solutions made during the development of a programmatic solution to a digital forensics problem.

 

 

Digital Forensics Using Open Source Tools

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim

    The aim of this module is to develop a practical working knowledge and understanding of Linux and open-source tools as a platform for performing computer forensic examinations.


Syllabus

    A distance-learning workbook, which includes a practical exercise for self-assessment. This ensures that all students have some familiarity with Linux prior to the residential.

    Linux Kernels, distributions, graphical environments, Unix platforms 
    Installing and configuring Linux and Linux applications
    File system layout, system management and security concepts
    Accessing devices, partitions, and file systems
    Using a desktop (GUI) environment,  common desktop applications, the shell and common command-line utilities
    Tools for basic process functions, such as viewing, converting, cryptographic hashing
    Identification and acquisition of disks and partitions. Import, export, and cloning of disk images, working with split, compressed or encrypted images
    Search concepts, including grep, find, and regular expressions
    Analysis and carving tools 
    Identifying and using open source tools
    Using scripting to automate processes and combine tools
    Forensic issues within the workflow, including repeatability and validity

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 compare and contrast the primary operating system platform choices from a forensic examination perspective,
 summarise and compare the range and capability of relevant tools available in the open source community,
 use and navigate a Linux system,
 apply standard Linux features, including the command shell and core utilities, to manage data and files in a forensic examination,
 securely and efficiently transfer data to and from a Linux system,
 apply core open-source forensic tools to forensic examinations,
 construct a complete forensic processing chain from open-source components, and assess its suitability for a forensic examination.

 

 

Mac Operating System Forensics

Module Leader
  • Dr Sarah Morris
Aim
    The aim of this module is to enable students to conduct a digital forensic analysis of an Apple Mac computer.
Syllabus
    Installation of Mac OS,
     use of Mac OS terminal,
     the Mac OS boot process,
     acquiring disk images using Mac OS,
     mounting disk images on Mac OS,
     identification of disks and partitions on Mac OS X including APM, MBR and GPT,
     filesystem forensics,
     bundles and packages,
     property lists,
     browser analysis,
     mail application analysis,
     use of Spotlight,
     log file locations and analysis,
     user accounts,
    iOS backups and connected devices,
    PDFs and printing.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

• analyse Mac OS digital forensics artefacts at various levels of abstraction, including those related to partitioning, file systems and the operating system,
analyse the artefacts left on disk by built-in applications on Mac OS, 
construct and carry out a suitable digital forensic analysis approach for an Apple Mac, 
evaluate the use of Mac OS for conducting an examination of an Apple Mac against traditional digital forensics tools.

 

Fakes and Forgeries

Module Leader
  • Dr Dennis Braekmans
  • Professor Andrew Shortland
Aim

    The module will provide an understanding of the principles of forensic and scientific investigations into art objects.

Syllabus
     Introduction to the art world,
    collectors, auction houses and museums,
    object and material types: (stone, ceramic, glass, metal, pigment, organics),
    scientific versus art historical analysis,
    special considerations of sampling,
    quasi-non-destructive and non-destructive techniques,
    relative and absolute dating,
     provenancing.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

• describe the basic functioning of the art market,
• demonstrate a critical awareness of the legal roles of various players and the part that science can play,
• critically assess the various scientific and non-scientific techniques,
• demonstrate an understanding of how sampling strategies are applied and which techniques are of most use,
be able to apply their knowledge to specific investigation of art objects to successfully come to a reasoned and balanced conclusion.

 

Trace Evidence

Module Leader
  • Professor David Lane
Aim

    The module will provide an understanding of the trace physical evidence and its associated forensic examination.

Syllabus
     Trace evidence concepts, direct and indirect transfer, retention time, transfer diagrams
     Fibre and hair construction
     Fibre and hair microscopy for identification and comparison
     Fabric comparison and damage
     Glass construction and forensic examination
     Paint characterization
     Soil analysis
     Blood spatter
     Finger prints
     Marks as evidence
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 investigate a wide range of physical evidence using the concept of ‘trace’ evidence
 project manage a systematic trace evidence search using appropriate detection and collection techniques  to recover trace evidence of different types,
 justify the categorisation of trace evidence by identifying and measuring their most important features using appropriate analytical techniques,
 assess the number and distributions of different types of trace evidence and use appropriate statistical techniques to compare samples and groups of samples,
 appraise different categories of trace evidence and synthesise a model for how trace evidence transfer has occurred,
 present a case for physical contact between two (or more) objects or persons using a transfer diagram,
 report on a trace evidence investigation in a clear and concise manner.

Forensic Exploitation and Intelligence

Module Leader
  • Stephen Johnson
Aim

    To provide an understanding of the principles and practical applications of the major forensic analytical techniques used in Forensic Intelligence (FORINT) and exploitation.

Syllabus
      • role of communication and information sharing
      • FORINT in long term policing strategy
      • exploitation and military intelligence
      • pattern analysis, GIS and mathematics in forensic intelligence
      • technical exploitation
      • forensic exploitation
      • planning and direction of forensic intelligence
      • collection, processing, production, management and dissemination of FORINT
      • forms of output and report from FORINT
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

• distinguish evidential types for use in court and for intelligence purposes
• evaluate the levels and range of forensic exploitation techniques
• manage and prioritise the exploitation of forensic intelligence derived from people, places and vehicles
• critically assess how forensic intelligence interfaces with other intelligence sources
• establish and maintain a FORINT exploitation policy within the frameworks of forensic best practice and the recognized intelligence cycle

Introductory Studies

Module Leader
  • Peter Masters
Aim

    The aim of Introductory Studies is to prepare students for their subsequent programme of study on the assessed modules. It is optional and carries a formal credit rating of zero, although a student’s understanding of the material covered may be tested as part of the assessments for the course modules. Students are advised to participate in Introductory Studies.

Syllabus
    The emphasis in Introductory Studies is on fundamentals and subjects are covered at first-degree level. Topics include:

    chemistry,
    archaeology and anthropology,
    computing services and library briefings,
    materials engineering,
    study skills and research methods,
    maths (including statistics),
    physics.


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

• revise, consolidate and expand their skill and knowledge base so that they can derive maximum benefit from the course.

 

 

Fees and Funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2019 to 2020 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (24 July 2018).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.


MSc Full-time £12,000
MSc Part-time £12,000 *
PgDip Full-time £10,000
PgDip Part-time £10,000 *
PgCert Full-time £5,000
PgCert Part-time £5,000 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

MSc Full-time £20,500
MSc Part-time £20,500 *
PgDip Full-time £16,400
PgDip Part-time £16,400 *
PgCert Full-time £8,000
PgCert Part-time £8,000 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2019 and 31 July 2020.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

Funding Opportunities

To help students find and secure appropriate funding, we have created a funding finder where you can search for suitable sources of funding by filtering the results to suit your needs. Visit the funding finder.

Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia)
Cranfield offers competitive scholarships for Mexican students in conjunction with Conacyt (Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia) in science, technology and engineering.

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England 
A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Santander MSc Scholarship
The Santander Scholarship at Cranfield University is worth £5,000 towards tuition fees for full-time master's courses. Check the scholarship page to find out if you are from an eligible Santander Universities programme country.

Chevening Scholarships
Chevening Scholarships are awarded to outstanding emerging leaders to pursue a one-year master’s at Cranfield university. The scholarship includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) 
The Cranfield Postgraduate Loan Scheme (CPLS) is a funding programme providing affordable tuition fee and maintenance loans for full-time UK/EU students studying technology-based MSc courses.

Commonwealth Scholarships for Developing Countries
Students from developing countries who would not otherwise be able to study in the UK can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship which includes tuition fees, travel and monthly stipend for Master’s study.

Future Finance Student Loans
Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Please contact studentfunding@cranfield.ac.uk for more information on funding.

Additional information on fees and funding can be found here.

Entry requirements

A first or second class Honours degree or equivalent in science, engineering or mathematics. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.

The full-time course is ideally suited to recent graduates in a related subject such as Computer Science or Forensic Science who wish to specialise in Digital Forensics. It is also suitable for those who have recently completed a BSc in Computer Forensics, Digital Forensics, Cybercrime Forensics or a related subject, who wish to deepen their knowledge, improve their skills and increase their employability, in what is a very competitive market. 

The part-time course is more suited to those already in full-time employment, such as law enforcement officers, government staff, security consultants, accountancy and banking organisations, corporate security personnel and members of associated agencies in both the UK and overseas. This programme could lead to a new career or promotion with an existing employer. Guidance may be sought by those who do not have the formal qualifications necessary to enrol immediately on to the programme, as to the best study route to take. Please contact us.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Security clearance for Shrivenham

Some Cranfield University courses are delivered at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham which is a Ministry of Defence (MOD) site. All applicants to courses that are wholly or partially delivered at Shrivenham must complete the BPSS (HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard V4 April 2014) prior to registration on the course or must already hold a security clearance to this level or higher.

Please visit our security clearance page for further information.



Your career

Our MSc course and its individual modules, or equivalent, are regularly cited in job adverts for digital forensics jobs. This highlights our real-world learning, application to the work place and our relevance to practitioners.

How to apply

You may be invited to attend an interview. If you are based outside the UK, you may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.

Important information

Decisions are currently being made regarding whether this course (and/or some of its modules) will be taught at Shrivenham or Cranfield in the 2019-2020 academic year and beyond.  The information on this page is up-to-date, but any changes will be sent to those who have already enquired or applied as soon as further details are available.