The Defence and Security Programme offers three degree streams to provide blended, flexible education suitable for a range of learners engaged in the complex, evolving defence and security environment.

The Leadership and Management stream of the Defence and Security Programme meets the requirements of the Level 7 Senior Leaders Master’s Degree Apprenticeship. Eligible organisations will be able to use £18,000 of their Apprenticeship Levy towards the overall cost.

Overview

  • Start dateSeptember
  • DurationMSc: three years, PgDip and PgCert: two years
  • DeliveryA mix of blended, distance or face-to-face learning with a broad range of assessments including essays, portfolios, presentations and group work.
  • QualificationMSc (Capstone), MSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typePart-time
  • CampusCranfield campus, Cranfield University at Shrivenham, Online

Who is it for?

This course is intended for the following range of students:

  • recent graduates wishing to extend their knowledge and skill within the domains of technology, engineering and leadership and management,
  • experienced and or qualified engineers, scientists, managers or leaders wishing to extend their skills or apply them in new areas.

Why this course?

The Defence and Security Programme offers the three degree streams to provide blended, flexible education suitable for a range of learners engaged in the complex, evolving defence and security environment. It offers the choice of two tailored learning routes, with extensive elective choices to meet the demands of learners across their career as well as meeting varying employer requirements. 

Course details

The programme provides innovation in the concept and delivery. All streams have common core modules providing essential professional competencies and four of the five core modules are delivered entirely at a distance across all streams providing flexibility for the learner. Each stream further provides depth in specialist topics aligned with their relevant range of disciplines. 

Many of the elective modules and the Introduction to Defence and Security are delivered as residential modules. These combine face to face lecturing, workshops and group work with use of our facilities including laboratories, simulation labs, and computer labs as examples.

Course delivery

A mix of blended, distance or face-to-face learning with a broad range of assessments including essays, portfolios, presentations and group work.

Modules

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the compulsory and elective (where applicable) modules which are currently affiliated with this course. All modules are indicative only, and may be subject to change for your year of entry.


Course modules

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Induction

Aim

    This module aims to:

    • equip the student with an overview and understanding of University rules, regulations, policies and procedures,
    • ensure the student recognises the University staff and support functions which enable course delivery and administration,
    • provide the student with the means of accessing all required learning, assessment and reference materials for successful study.

Syllabus
    1.    Introduction to student and academic support team – 20 mins (presentation):

    • composition of your student and academic support team,
    • introduction to and contact details for your SAS lead,
    • your course handbook – summary overview,
    • exceptional circumstances – when and how they apply,
    • student attendance policy – what it means and how it is implemented,
    • student handbooks – overview of university rules and regulations,
    • academic misconduct – overview,
    • registry – what registry does and how to contact registry staff.


    2.    Introduction to student advisors and learning support – 10 mins (presentation):

    • where to find the student advice centre,
    • what learning support officers can help you with,
    • how to access learning support,
    • frequently asked questions,
    • student advice centre contact details.


    3.    IT and VLE Induction – 60 minutes (presentation with activities):

    • your CCNT account – what it gives you access to; logging on to your account,
    • IT at Shrivenham – DAC accounts, WiFi access, printing, scanning, copying,
    • Cranfield University IT policies, Defence Academy IT policies/SYOPS,
    • accessing password manager,
    • accessing Cranfield email,
    • using the extranet, in particular accessing electronic library resources,
    • an introduction to Moodle and how to access your learning materials,
    • location and overview of ‘help/student support’ area on Moodle,
    • BYOD,
    • where to find information about free IT training courses,
    • how to obtain IT support throughout your study,
    • how to access the online timetabling system,
    • IT service desk contact details.



    4.    Barrington library introduction
    – 60 minutes (presentation with activities):

    • how to access Barrington Library staff and services,
    • introduction to book loans – terms and conditions,
    • accessing a University library space near you,
    • E-Books and articles – how to access,
    • introduction to information literacy, critical thinking, critical reading, critical analysis, confirmation bias,
    • introduction to plagiarism,
    • introduction to referencing: Referencing guide, reference management software (Mendeley).



    5.    Turnitin workshop -  60 minutes (presentation and online workshop):

    • explaining Turnitin- plagiarism PREVENTION software,
    • understanding what can and cannot be submitted via Turnitin,
    • how to ensure your document meets the criteria for upload (MS Word, PDF),
    • locating the Turnitin Workshop page in Moodle,
    • activity 1: completion of the technology preferences questionnaire,
    • activity 2: review the Turnitin support available,
    • activity 3: submit a practice assessment via a practice assignment submission point,
    • answer the Turnitin workshop quiz.





Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:


Knowledge

 identify and locate the support staff and services available to aid successful study, both physically and via online services,
 understand university rules, regulations, policies and procedures to support successful study and where to find such documentation for future reference,
 recognise how to avoid academic misconduct,
 describe the basic principles of information literacy,
 understand the processes for alerting the university to any issues affecting course completion (technical, administrative, personal).

Skills

 access all digital services linked to a CCNT account, both at Shrivenham and when studying off-site,
 locate staff, reference materials and support guides both at Shrivenham and when studying off-site,
 demonstrate navigation to and completion of all online induction activities (e.g. Turnitin workshop, plagiarism quiz, library induction activities),
 submit a test assessment via a practice assignment submission point.

Introduction to Defence and Security

Module Leader
  • Professor Ann Fitz-Gerald
Aim

    This module aims to introduce the concept and content of the defence and security disciplines, and how they are implemented and deliver via a capability based approach along national and global contexts.

Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    from policy to operations – defence and security in the UK,
    a global phenomemon – the international view,
    UK acquisition and reform,
    current and future needs and drivers,
    enabling defence and security technology,
    beyond technology and people – an introduction to capability engineering,
    integrated partnerships or reluctant bedfellows? - the UK defence and security enterprise,
    national and international case studies.

     


Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

identify how defence capability contributes to UK defence and security policy,
examine how technology contributes to acquiring of defence capability and how it is managed,
assess the effectiveness of the defence enterprise with respects to the development and acquisition of defence capability.

Leadership and Management

Module Leader
  • Dr Iftikhar Zaidi
Aim

    This module aims to evaluate management and leadership theories, identifying strategies to enhance organisational performance.

     

     


Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    leadership theories and concepts,
    management theories and concepts,
    comparison of management and leadership,
    the relationship between change management and leadership,
    the relationship between decision making and management and leadership approach,
    language, narrative, communication and rhetoric.

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

assess current management concepts, systems and challenges to the management of (technology, engineering and defence),
analyse the strengths and weaknesses of selected management theories and practice when developing defence and security solutions,
debate the comparative advantages and disadvantages of various forms of leadership,
critically evaluate the linkage between change management and leadership,
describe the role of language, narrative, communication and rhetoric in management and leadership.

Decision Analysis and Support

Module Leader
  • Dr Ken McNaught
Aim

    The aim of this module is to enable students to deal with complex problems using a range of techniques that enable auditability and traceability of decisions.




Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    approaches to dealing with uncertainty and risk,
    the role of trade-off and managing conflicting objectives,
    representing and navigating complexity,
    exploring cognitive bias and it impact on decision making.


Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

distinguish between different decision types and their relationship to uncertainty and risk,
describe cognitive bias and its impact on decision making,
construct a range of models to represent decision situations and support decision making,
explain the role of trade-off and its impact on decision making and outcome,
evaluate a range of models and their suitability for different problem types.

Stakeholder Management and Organisational Behaviour

Module Leader
  • Jeremy Hilton
Aim

    The aim of this module is to assess and manage the impact of people on organisation success.





Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    organisational culture, power and resistance in organisations: organisational structures and design,
    the concept of the learning organisation,
    tools and techniques for stakeholder engagement and management,
    organisational structures and their relationship to function and output.

     

     

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

appraise stakeholder engagement and management tools and techniques as part of a stakeholder management strategy,
assess the impact of organisational structure on successful delivery of a business output,
evaluate the concept of the learning organisation with respects to stakeholder management strategy,
distinguish organisational barriers to effective decision making,
apply stakeholder management techniques to a representative case study.

Research Methods (non-capstone)

Module Leader
  • Dr Tracey Temple
Aim

    The aim of this module is to equip the student with the key concepts and skills involved in generating publishable research.





Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    research paradigms and their application,
    how to write a critical literature review including the assessment of evidence and how to select appropriate sources,
    data analysis, including qualitative, quantitative and mixed method approaches,
    creating publishable quality research including discipline specific journals and how to write academically credible and professional reports.


Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

appraise the suitability of different research paradigms in the context of an identified research question,
construct a critical literature review of key texts, identifying the academic theory most relevant to an identified research questions,
compare and contrast different data analysis techniques,
distinguish between different forms of evidence; their validity and verifiability,
outline the key requirements in generating research of a publishable quality, including specific needs of specific journals,
relate research methods to the generation of innovative solutions and designs across defence and security challenges.



Thesis (non-capstone)

Module Leader
  • Professor Emma Sparks
Aim
    To conduct a self-directed piece of research applying the principles, practices and processes developed in the course to a real world problem of interest and relevance to the student. 
Syllabus
    The thesis forms a vital element of the programme of study and offers the student an opportunity to develop and apply the knowledge and skills gained from the course to an agreed topic. Students will be allocated an academic supervisor who will guide them in the suitability of topic chosen and conduct of the research.

     

Intended learning outcomes

 
On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

acquire, organise, discuss and assess knowledge associated with complex defence and security problems,
plan, organise and undertake a piece of research with appropriate supervision,
apply appropriate methods, tools, techniques and knowledge to a complex problem,
gather and critically appraise data, and to utilise it within the appropriate academic and practical context,
prepare a written submission to effectively communicate findings. 

 

 



Capstone Development and Exploitation (capstone route only)

Module Leader
  • Matthew Summers
Aim
    Development of a stable and sound academic concept with a robust foundational position is critical to expand the boundaries of the art of the possible and introduce new, innovative or novel ways of working or products to the marketplace. Equally important to good ideas is the ability to exploit and integrate these as portfolio outputs into business as usual to realise the benefits within a business environment. This module provides the theoretical and practical foundation to enable students to develop an academically sound concept, then create and deliver a compelling business case and bid to gain support for technical activities, and finally prepare an exploitation plan and benefits realisation strategy to turn the outputs from their concept and portfolio into tangible, business enhancing outcomes. This module sees the student develop a ‘what if?’ concept, and then communicate the ‘so what?’ from their capstone portfolio.
     
Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    the ‘what if?’ – developing a research question and academic enquiry
    the literature review – theory, methods & practice
    the ‘so what?’ – exploiting output into real life benefits
    benefits management theory and practice
    a compelling future – preparing and delivering a proposal
    academic purity vs business outcomes – applied study design
    maximising the potential for support
    who, what, where, how – transition management
    exploitation strategies

     

     

Intended learning outcomes

 
On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

identify, develop and choose research questions within the student’s specific area of interest,
construct a critical literature review of key texts, identifying the academic theory most relevant to the identified research questions,
explain the importance of exploitation and the impact this has on project design,
develop a business case that articulates the proposed benefits of a proposed project within a business context,
defend a proposed project to subject matter experts to gain support and approval,
design and deliver transition activities to transform output into exploited business benefits.

 

 


Capstone Portfolio (capstone route only)

Module Leader
  • Professor Emma Sparks
Aim
    To create a portfolio of work applying the principles, practices and processes developed in the course to a real world problem of interest and relevance to the student. 
Syllabus
    The capstone portfolio is an integrative collection of work that draws together the knowledge and skills gained from across the taught phase of the programme. It comprises a structured set of papers that enable application and critical reflection. 

    There is a direct link to the content and output of the capstone development and exploitation model with students being allocated an academic supervisor who will guide them in the suitability of topic chosen which will create the golden thread throughout the development of the portfolio. 

Intended learning outcomes

 On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

acquire, organise, discuss and assess knowledge associated with complex defence and security problems,
plan, organise and undertake a piece of applied research with appropriate supervision,
apply appropriate methods, tools, techniques and knowledge to a complex problem,
gather and critically appraise data, and to utilise it within the appropriate academic and practical context,
prepare a written portfolio to effectively communicate and exploit findings. 

 

 

 





Elective modules
A selection of modules from the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Commercial Relationships in the Defence Environment

Module Leader
  • Dr Robby Allen
Aim

    To present the range of approaches to contracting for capability and to tie this back to the legal requirements associated with both national and international law.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    key statute law,
    international aspects, including EU regulations and ITAR,
    inter-organisational relationships,
    commercial constructs (incl PPP, partnering and alliances),
    payment mechanisms,
    governance and contract management,
    IPR,
    disputes and termination.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

illustrate the legal framework in which defence contracts are let,
describe what constitutes a contract,
propose appropriate supplier selection and contracting models for a range of capability requirements,
formulate effective relationship managements processes,
categorise IPR issues,
evaluate issue management procedures.


Cost Estimation and Planning

Aim

    The module aims to enable the students to understand the basic principles of cost estimation and its place use within the acquisition and through life support processes.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    the concept of cost estimation and its use within the acquisition process,
    the importance of considering whole life cost,
    the cost estimation process:

    o defining the scope of the study,
    o data collection and management,
    o costing using benchmarks,
    o costing by analogy,
    o parametric cost modelling,
    o verification and validation,
    o sensitivity analysis,

    dealing with uncertainty and risk:

    o use of three-point estimates and Monte-Carlo simulation,

    outputs and uses of cost estimation:

    o balance of investment studies,
    o identification of key cost drivers,
    o budget support,
    o negotiation support,

    through life capability management.




Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

distinguish between and define different terms applied to cost estimation, e.g. total cost of ownership, whole life costs etc.,
critically evaluate the use of cost estimation methods at different stages of the lifetime of equipment or a service,
compare the strengths and weaknesses of different cost modelling techniques,
critically evaluate the importance of uncertainty and risk and their relative importance in different situations,
apply different methods to define the scope of a cost estimation study,
design a data collection and management plan for a cost estimation study,
use a cost model to cost different options for supplying a capability and to carry out a sensitivity analysis on their results,
conduct Monte-Carlo simulation based on three-point estimates using suitable software,
interpret different outputs from cost models within the context of a particular study.
 

Counterterrorism and Intelligence

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    To enable participants to analyse and explain current conceptual thinking regarding the nature of terrorism, its origins, motivations and manifestations, together with an in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the counter-terrorism approaches and intelligence approaches and strategies adopted by states. Within the context of counterterrorism, the module also examines the role of intelligence in combatting terrorism, the relationship between intelligence and secrecy and its impact, as well as the ethical issues in the use of intelligence. 


Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    • definitional issues,
    • conceptual approaches to terrorism,
    • the origins and use of terrorism throughout history,
    • the nature and causes of terrorism,
    • understanding terrorists: the origins, motivations and manifestations of terrorist groups.terrorist organisations and networks,
    • the process of radicalisation,
    • assessing the success and failure of terrorist groups,
    • counter-terrorism approaches and strategies: assumptions, aims, frameworks and principles,
    • evaluate the purpose and structures of intelligence function,
    • identify and assess categories of intelligence. (sources, disciplines, organisations),
    • assess the influence of culture, history, power, and human factors upon the effectiveness of intelligence. assumptions, aims, frameworks and principles,
    • CT strategies, globally, regionally and nationally,
    • the CT ‘toolkit’.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

 • demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current conceptual thinking regarding the phenomenon of terrorism and the threat that it poses, graphically, orally and in writing,
• evaluate terrorist groups in terms of their type, techniques, manifestations and success or otherwise, both today and in the past,
• critique extant counter-terrorism approaches and strategies and evaluate their relative merits in the context of democratic values and human rights,
• analyse the use of intelligence as an integrated tool of policy-making and evaluate the existent frameworks that prevent intelligence from becoming a political tool,
• evaluate how terrorist organisations attempt to develop their intelligence capabilities and how counter-intelligence can effectively mitigate against this threat,
• demonstrate creativity and originality in the development of policy relevant recommendations in the fields of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Defence and Security Offset

Module Leader
  • Professor Ron Matthews
Aim

    The module is designed to provide the theoretical frameworks and practical skills to appreciate the purpose, process and performance of offset within a defence and security marketing context, and from the perspective of both the offshore vendor and recipient nations.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    •  definitional scope and purposes of offset,
    •  market and technology drivers,
    •  offset theory and typology,
    •  offset policy mechanisms,
    •  comparative policy performance across states,
    •  offset policies and practice,
    •  evolvement of civil procurement - civil offset policies,
    •  European procurement directive,
    •  offset success factors,
    •  examining the impact of offset,
    •  managing offsets,
    •  evaluating offset performance,
    •  offset and corruption.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

apply and analyse offset in the global markets,
evaluate strategies to negotiate offset proposals,
apply the skills to evaluate the concepts, tools and the processes of offset,
critically analyse and compare the various offset policies,
determine and evaluate offset proposals,
critically examine country-specific offset projects.            
 

Defence in the 21st Century

Module Leader
  • Dr Laura Cleary
Aim

    To understand the changing nature of civil-military relations and in the process identify the likely roles for defence forces in the 21st century.

Syllabus
    the theories of civil-military relations,
    the role(s) of armed forces in democracies and other regime types,
    introduction to the governance and management of defence,
    the domestic legal framework for defence,
    the international legal framework for defence,
    why do armies engage in coups d’état?
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

critically assess and apply the theories which underpin the study of civil-military relations,
analyse the dominant trends in civil-military relations,
compare and contrast civil-military relations in different regions of the world,
recognise the relevance of law to defence.





Defence Sector and Organisational Behaviour

Aim

    The aim of this module is to introduce students to the disciplines of organisational behaviour, as they apply within the defence sector.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content: 

    the history and contemporary developments in the structure and organisation of defence, in particular the MOD, but also the defence supply base,
    the nature of groups, group performance and cohesiveness; situational factors in human behaviour,
    organisational culture, power and resistance in organisations, organisational structures and design, organisational decision making.
     
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

•  evaluate the available literature concerning group behaviours within the context of their implications for defence,
•  critically discuss a range of theories relating to the structure, culture and power relations in defence,
•  assess the dynamics of a working group and its environment to inform their own input for the purposes of leading that group,
•  analyse the structure and culture of defence, to identify possible dysfunction or conflict, and to identify appropriate corrective action,
•  recognise organisational barriers to effective decision-making and planning in defence and devise techniques to overcome them.

 

 

Efficient and Effective Through Life Support

Aim

    The module will enable students to analyse critically the challenges and key issues for the efficient and effective delivery of through life support (TLS) solutions in the Defence environment, and enable them to make better informed through life support management decisions.

Syllabus

    Indicative module content:


    Defence through-life support context and overview

    what through-life support encapsulates: the scale, scope and value of TLS in defence in the UK and internationally,
    how TLS is contracted for and delivered,
    governance; cultures, enablers and blockers; pricing mechanisms, profits, gain share and incentivisation; behaviours; lessons learnt.

    TLS through the lifecycle

    setting TLS requirements,
    support chain design,
    sourcing and manufacturing decisions,
    support systems integration,
    support chain and physical supply chain operations in-service, including spares optimisation, managing SC disruptions, turbulence and volatility, obsolescence, parts counterfeiting,
    end-of-life value recovery and sustainable practice.

    The costs of supporting capability through-life

    cost of ownership, and the contribution of support costs to whole life costs,
    operation and support costs,
    support cost modelling and identifying and managing support cost drivers,
    leveraging better outcomes - linking support cost drivers to defence operational outputs.

    Managing performance in through-life support

    general theory of performance management, outcomes and assessment,
    modelling for operational availability, quantifying and managing the trade-offs,
    modelling for spares availability, quantifying and managing the trade-offs,
    measuring what matters: ensuring the right metrics for the delivery of operational effect.

    Managing information for through-life support


    network enabled capability for TLS: Information needs for asset management and engineering support, commercial and defence practice,
    agreeing and implementing a common language for support: data and information standards, protocols and architectures.

     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module students will be able to:

critique theoretical through-life support good practice and real experience from commercial and international perspectives, and its relevance and applicability to defence,
evaluate the applicability and utility of a range of decision support tools and approaches to  better informed through-life support decision making in the defence context and through the lifecycle,
demonstrate a conceptual understanding of the broad direction of academic research, and of the development of new approaches and processes, in the field of through-life support in defence,
utilise UK and international public and private sector experience and perspectives to identify the determinants of effective and efficient through-life support,
critically analyse specific through-life support solutions in defence, identifying their key characteristics, strengths and weaknesses, and assessing how they can be improved.
 

Future Military Conflicts and Support to Disasters

Aim
    The aim of this module is to examine the potential changing role of the military in both developed and developing countries; to analyse how hybrid warfare is likely to affect militaries; to enable participants to research the current strategic and security issues, including cyber warfare, hybrid warfare, space warfare; to predict the nature of future conflict; and to propose new forms of warfare.
Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    •  origins of warfare,
    •  classical military theorists and their relevance today,
    •  definition of ‘symmetric’ and ‘asymmetric’ and types of symmetry and asymmetry,
    •  theorists of asymmetric conflict:  Callwell, Kitson,
    •  future asymmetric warfare,
    •  the theory and future practice of land, air and naval power,
    •  coalition warfare,
    •  nuclear strategy,
    •  ‘operations other than war’ and ‘low intensity operations’,
    •  peacekeeping operations,
    •  irregular warfare and hybrid warfare, 
    •  cyber warfare.
     

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

predict a broad knowledge and understanding of the works of the great military thinkers and those which relate to asymmetric conflict, compare and contrast them with those relating to symmetric conflict, and evaluate their relevance to modern operations,
analyse ‘low intensity operations’ and ‘operations other than war’,
analyse the theory and practice of peacekeeping and recent intervention operations,
speculate upon the development of guerrilla warfare and partisan operations and evaluate their effect on political outcomes and, where relevant, conventional military campaigns,
critique deterrence theory and nuclear strategy,
speculate upon the likely nature of future threats and responses, and
model the likely nature of future conflict.

Global Security: Culture and Complexity

Module Leader
  • Dr Bryan Watters
Aim

    To provide an academic perspective on the nature and role of key international security and defence organisations and the importance of culture and place as a context for leadership.

Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    •  key bilateral and multilateral stakeholders,
    •  bureaucratic, administrative and legal challenges to strategic leadership in guiding the development of national security strategy,
    •  the role of culture and international political economy on strategic planning and international interventions,
    •  decision-making frameworks: methodologies supporting different leadership styles in a range of multinational contexts,
    •  culture as an important driver of transitional change.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

•  describe the key players in the global security and defence arena and their inter-relationships,
•  critically evaluate the contemporary developments and disputes concerning the nature of strategic cultural analysis and its relevance to leadership,
•  define the role of ‘bureaucratic culture’ in the development and implementation of national security policy,
•  reflect upon and critique the utility of cultural analysis, and a range of other analytical tools, for the purposes of wider strategic planning,
•  compare and contrast the role of different academic disciplines to the analysis of culture,
•  apply different decision-making approaches across a range of different contexts,
•  undertake relevant strategic analysis (underpinned by a strong cultural element) of a wider security or defence organisation, a bilateral government ministry or country defence department, of their choice, using appropriate conceptual frameworks.

Global Security: Emerging Challenges

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    To provide theoretical perspectives and methods of analysis for understanding the nature of contemporary security threats, the tools needed for in-depth examination of emerging challenges, and the measures needed to deal with adverse global outcomes.

Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    introduces the traditional threats as well as new and (re)-emerging security challenges,
    transnational security issues that have global implications,
    strategic actions and policy developments designed to deal with challenges,
    noteworthy opportunities for co-operation and collaboration among and within various stakeholders. 

     

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

acquire an understanding of how security threats are defined and addressed,
understand the dynamics by which decision makers prioritise security threats,
appreciate the ethical, political, and social dilemmas of security policies,
think critically about the nature of developing global security needs,
evaluate the utility of current leadership theories and models to equip leaders to lead during emergent challenges,
articulate informed opinion about pros and cons of policy making dealing with emerging challenges,
assess the impact to the UK of emergent global security threats,
debate the utility of leadership theory to the challenges leaders face as a result of emerging threats to global security.
 

Knowledge in Defence

Aim

    The aim of this module is to engage its participants in an evaluation of knowledge, its creation, acquisition, storage and diffusion within a defence organisational context.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    understanding knowledge and what it is- how we think and how we learn,
    concept of organisational learning and knowledge management practice,
    knowledge (information) management strategies,
    impediments to learning,
    communities of practice,
    reasoning,
    research practice.
     
Intended learning outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to:

understand the theory of knowledge; critically examine general classifications of knowledge, and associated organisational typologies,
identify thinking and learning styles,
evaluate organisational learning concepts,
evaluate knowledge management concepts and practice,
evaluate knowledge management strategies and their development.
 

Leadership Studies - Classical and Modern

Aim

    To provide an introduction to Classical & Modern Leadership Studies, and their impact on the conceptualisation of leadership in defence.


Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    origins of leadership,
    classical leadership,
    traits,
    behaviours,
    power,
    charisma,
    contingency theory,
    transformational and transactional leadership,
    adaptive leadership,
    language,
    narrative,
    communications and rhetoric,
    the romance of leadership,
    social identity theory,
    decision-making,
    development of leadership concepts in defence.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

develop a coherent argument for explaining the historical trends in leadership studies,
describe the divergent approaches to leadership,
compare and contrast the most important trends in leadership, especially within the defence sector,
summarise the role of language, narrative, communications and rhetoric in leadership,
interpret the development of leadership theory in defence,
debate the comparative advantages and disadvantages of various forms of leadership, classical and modern, with particular reference to defence,
critically discuss the rhetorical techniques of leadership.
 

Legal Ethical and Political Frameworks for Defence

Module Leader
  • Professor Ann Fitz-Gerald
Aim

    The module will provide a comprehensive understanding of the legal and political frameworks in which defence institutions function. Within this module a critical awareness of the regulatory regimes affecting defence exports will be covered, as well as the political pressures which underpin them. The module is an amalgam of lectures, syndicated discussions and directed research seeking to establish the relevance of applying diagnostic frameworks for international defence engagements to the context in which such parties operate.

     


Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    defence in a national security context,
    defence reform as part of the national security agenda,
    the role of governance,
    understanding overseas governments,
    the arms trade and ethical issues,
    governance of the Defence export trade,
    the UK's Government approach to overseas defence engagements,
    how export controls are established and implemented in major defence trading blocs and nations,
    international legal frameworks, export controls and the donor community,
    compliance and non-compliance.
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

critically evaluate the political pressures in certain regions and the difficulties which arise with weak state/regional governance structures,
examine and country's overall security sector and assess the challenges this poses to the wider national security and development agenda,
analyse the role of international donors, financial institutions and the global development agenda and how the defence trade often introduce conflicting forces that run counter to objectives of other agenda,
critically evaluate the key ethical considerations for organisations undertaking business in the arms trade,
contrast and evaluate export controls of a number of countries and regions.

Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context

Module Leader
  • Dr Laura Cleary
Aim

    To enhance the student’s knowledge, professional understanding and analytical skills necessary to improve and/or transform the governance and management of their defence and security systems.


Syllabus
    Indicative module content:
     
     defence management,
    strategic analysis and planning,
    organisational structure, culture and behaviour,
    human resource management,
    financial management,
    risk management,
    project management,
    policy to capability,
    change management.
     


Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student will be able to:

relate grand strategy (policy) to the operational level,
apply current management concepts, systems and challenges to the management of defence,
analyse the strengths and weaknesses of selected defence management theories and practices,
evaluate the relevance of various management practices to students’ current defence systems.

 

 


National Security: Resilience and Crisis

Module Leader
  • Dr Bryan Watters
Aim

    To provide an understanding of the role of leadership in the development, prevention and resolution of challenges to national security, including terrorism and civil crises.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    national and international security,
    global trends,
    resilience as a social science concept,
    people and crises,
    the mass media landscape,
    natural disasters as national security issue,
    disaster management,
    organisational resilience in the UK,
    health protection and crisis,
    terrorism and counter terrorism, 
    leadership resilience in crises.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

analyse the history and contemporary manifestations of leadership in relation to national security issues,
evaluate the utility of alternative leadership approaches to civil crises, particularly when the military are used to assist civil authorities,
critically assess and apply the typology of tame and wicked problems to contemporary national security problems,
critically analyse the development of academic theory and its application to the management of disruptive events that impact on national security,
apply typologies of situations and their appropriate leadership styles to a variety of contemporary situations.
 

Negotiation

Module Leader
  • Dr Robby Allen
Aim

    The module is designed to introduce the student to marketing applications in the defence and security sectors, particularly to the concepts of strategic marketing management and key account planning as a specialist form of client-focused strategic marketing planning and to the specialist nature of marketing communications in the defence sector, as well as how marketing communications are used by terrorist groups and those seeking to counter them. The module also seeks to provide students with a critical understanding of organisational buying behaviour in defence and security markets and of how new product development projects are undertaken given the increasingly co-operative focus of supply chain relationships in the defence sector.


Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    principles of negotiation,
    process and structure of negotiation,
    negotiation practice sessions,
    negotiation strategies,
    negotiating and managing contracts.
     
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

• identify and evaluate the process and approaches to negotiation in a defence business setting,
• undertake effective negotiation simulations,
• analyse the different strategic approaches to the negotiation, determining when to apply each in the commercial defence arena,
• evaluate the impact of interpersonal relationships on negotiation and relationship management in defence-related businesses.

 

 

Risk, Crisis and Resilience

Module Leader
  • Edith Wilkinson
Aim

    The aim of this module is to examine the concepts of risk, crisis and resilience.  This module will make students assess the meaning of resilience through examining the concepts of risk and crisis. Risk and crisis management practices will be explored and debated in the context of their application as contemporary decision-making framework specifically in the field of security.




Syllabus

    Indicative module content:

    risk as concept and risk theory,
    risk management tools  and risk management methodology,
    • RM cycle and assessment,
    risk as contemporary decision-making paradigm and challenges to the risk management paradigm,
    complex adaptive systems and resilience thinking,
    components of the implementation approaches to resilience strategies,
    crisis management evolution of the discipline and debates,
    business continuity planning,
    case-studies and activities.

     

     

     

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

introduce systems theory and its relevance to risk, crises and resilience,
review the multifaceted  meaning of the resilience concept and describe its key components and discuss its origins and evolution,
discuss  key elements of risk theories,
appraise the significance of crises in the context of how they affect people and communities,
identify the organisational structures and individual skills and knowledge necessary to manage crises effectively,
describe, distinguish risk and crisis management tools, processes, and frameworks, and critically evaluate them,
examine risk and crisis communication, politics of decision-making, human factors in decision-making, paradoxes with perception and uncertainty,
analyse the contemporary applicability of risk in a resilience strategy,
critically evaluate the implementation approaches and consider the politics of resilience.
 

Strategic Management and Introduction to Acquisition

Module Leader
  • Stuart Young
Aim

    The module will give students a clear understanding of the process of strategy development and the discipline of strategic management within a defence acquisition context together with an appreciation of the complexities of international acquisition.


Syllabus
    Indicative module content: 

    Strategic Management

    introducing strategy and the strategy process,
    strategy development in a public sector setting,
    the strategy process in the MOD,
    the environment and its implications for strategy in the private and public sectors,
    analytical tools and techniques in strategy formulation,
    understanding the organisational competencies and capabilities and the specific case of, acquisition within the MOD,
    the role of stakeholders and stakeholder mapping in a public and private sector setting,
    the significance of organisational structure on strategic thinking and direction.

    Introduction to Acquisition

    acquisition within a through-life and capability management context,
    key acquisition processes and underpinning skill, information and organisational structures,
    comparison with other national acquisition approaches,
    collaborative defence acquisition,
    socio-economic and security context,
    trends in the global defence industry.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

understand the evolution of strategic management as a subject,
critically evaluate the key similarities and differences between private and public sectors in the development of strategy in general and the MOD in particular,
define acquisition in a defence context and identify the implications for skills, information management, business processes and organisational structures within the UK defence context,
analyse the wider socio-economic issues associated with defence acquisition in a UK, international and industrial context,
demonstrate the ability to apply analytical tools and techniques to a problem,
present solutions to problems in both written form and through presentations,
argue cogently in a real time environment.
 

Supply Network Management in Defence and the Commercial Environment

Aim

    The module will enable students to analyse critically key logistics and supply network models, theories, and approaches, and be able to analyse their utilities and applicability to delivering more effective and efficient logistics and supply network management in defence.

Syllabus

    Indicative module content: 

    Logistics and Supply Networks - Context, Design, Functions and Purpose

    • strategic context and challenges,
    • efficient and effective supply networks; agile, lean, and hybrid models in defence and in the commercial environment,
    • value chain analysis,
    • comparative logistics and supply networks - commercial and defence,
    • trade-offs in the defence logistics and supply systems,
    • operational logistics and supply network implications of differing support contracting approaches.

    Managing the Inventory Function in Defence

    • the nature of the defence inventory in comparison with that found in commerce and industry and the resultant challenges,
    • the costs and risks of different inventory management strategies (e.g., stockpile versus surge),
    • inventory management to achieve desired service levels and availability.

    Achieving and Assuring an Integrated Defence Supply Network

    • differing approaches to analysing supply networks,
    • managing risk in the supply network,
    • operational coherence and assurance
    • supply network performance management.,

    Information and Knowledge Management in Logistics and Supply Network Management

    • the role of data, information, and knowledge in logistics and supply network management decision making; its critical contribution to established management models,
    • operational logistics information in defence; current and developing systems,
    • business-to-business, business-to-customer, customer-to-customer networks; asset tracking, consignment visibility, FID, barcoding.

     
Intended learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

demonstrate an understanding of the broad direction of academic research in logistics and supply network management,
contrast the underlying similarities and differences between supply networks within the commercial and defence environments,
critically evaluate the utility and applicability of logistics and supply network management theories, models, and approaches to defence,
critically evaluate and apply risk models to supply networks,
critically analyse and identify the added value of the logistics process in defence and the commercial environment,
analyse and evaluate the potential for improvement in the logistics and supply network management in defence.
 

Sustainability in Defence

Module Leader
  • Matthew Summers
Aim

    This module aims to develop an understanding of Sustainability and it’s applicability to Defence Acquisition and the wider environment.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    sustainable development: terminology, definitions and interpretation,
    sustainable development: the international perspective,
    characteristics of sustainable thinking,
    UK Government and MOD sustainable development policy and strategy,
    environmental protection/environmental regulation - legal framework,
    sustainable supply chains - risks and vulnerabilities,
    sustainable consumption and production - material availability,
    environmental security – implications,
    energy security – impacts and long term risks (conflict),
    sustainable procurement – considerations and current practice throughout the CADMID cycle.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

identify the key challenges of sustainability in defence,
understand the key drivers of sustainability in defence,
demonstrate an understanding of how sustainability and resilience can impact defence,
illustrate the effective application of sustainability in providing effective capability change management through-life,
demonstrate an understanding of how sustainability considerations impact on the development of defence capabilities across defence globally,
critically analyse discipline boundaries to pursue sustainability,
evaluate the relevance of sustainability and justify their application through-life,
manage sustainable strategies to maximise benefits and minimise potential adverse impacts through-life,
critically evaluate potential challenges, risks and impacts associated with sustainability through-life.
 

Strategic Management in Defence

Aim

    The module will develop knowledge and understanding of the key academic concepts in strategic management where students are invited to test the relevance of module content in a defence environment.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    •  relevance of new public management (NPM) to strategic management and the defence environment,
    •  detailing and analysing the MOD strategic planning process,
    •  history and key thinkers in the development of management theory, eg Fayol, Taylor, Ford, Drucker, Porter and Mintzberg,
    •  defining the strategy process: analysis, options and implementation,
    •  identifying linkage between leadership and strategic management.
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

appraise the key academic theories involved in strategic management,
critically evaluate the potential relevance of these theories in a defence context,
critically analyse commercial situations to determine the relevance of particular theories,
generate and evaluate debate on the relevance of leadership theories to the defence context,
develop academically grounded arguments to support a particular stance.
 

The International Dimensions of Defence Acquisition

Module Leader
  • Dr Pete Ito
Aim

    The module will give students a clear understanding of the implications and impact of international dimensions of defence acquisition, using concepts and theories from the disciplines of International Relations and Politics as well as relevant management fields.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    •  key concepts from politics and international relations; sovereignty, dependence, inter-dependence, national interest, linkage politics, regimes, and globalisation,
    •  key theories from politics and international relations; political realism, Utopianism, regional integration theory, and constructivism,
    •  the place of national cultural consideration,
    •  international dimensions,
    •  international trade, co-operation and cross-border supply and support chains,
    •  collaboration as a corporate and governmental activity,
    •  national and international export control regimes, and arms control treaties
    •  Europe: the European Union, the European Defence Agency, OCCAR and the Letter of Intent Framework countries and defence acquisition,
    •  NATO and the transatlantic dimension of defence acquisition,
    •  working with others and learning from others: selected national acquisition 
     
Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

understand the differences between the realist, the Utopian and the constructivist approaches in international relations, and their implications for defence acquisition,
demonstrate awareness of the place of national and international regulation regarding defence acquisition,
appreciate the key elements in debates about the dynamics of co-operation and regional integration in Europe, including the place of spillover processes, in so far as they concern defence,
manifest critical understanding of the place of inter-governmental co-operation and collaboration in contemporary defence acquisition,
appreciate the operation of the defence acquisition systems of key partners and allies of the United Kingdom,
apply concepts and theories from politics and international relations to acquisition issues,
present reasoned and evidenced responses to empirical problems in a written form,
analyse the key dimensions of any state’s defence acquisition system,
compare and contrast the guiding concepts, structures and processes of the United Kingdom defence acquisition system with those of key partners and allies of the United Kingdom.
 

The Psychology of Leadership

Module Leader
  • Rebecca McKeown
Aim

    The module will provide a grounding in psychological aspects of leadership in the context of complex organisations and defence.

Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    •  fundamentals of psychology and cognition,
    •  intuition and unconscious processes,
    •  leadership in complex adaptive systems and the comprehensive approach,
    •  cognitive fitness for leadership.
     

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

distinguish the basic dimensions of human behaviour,
relate key psychological theories to leadership behaviour,
recognise different cognitive strategies and appreciate strengths and weaknesses for different situations,
explain how the principles of behaviour relate to organisational structure, context and output, with reference to the operational and business aspects of defence,
debate the relevance of complexity theory to leadership in defence,
assess the value of key psychological approaches for understanding leadership,
evaluate the potential benefits of cognitive training for supporting effective leadership.

Programme and Project Management

Aim

    This module aims to establish a baseline of student knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles of project, programme management and portfolio management. It will introduce key principles, processes, tools and the techniques underpinning project and programme management and will raise awareness of associated issues, with particular emphasis on leadership challenges in defence.


Syllabus
    Indicative module content:

    •  the strategic context of project and programme management,
    •  portfolio management and application in defence reform,
    •  programme management and managing successful programmes (MSP),
    •  project management BoKs and methods,
    •  project life cycle,
    •  multi-cultural management,
    •  scheduling,
    •  budget and cash flow,
    •  estimating and risk.
     
Intended learning outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to: 

describe the basic theoretical concepts that underpin effective project management and its links to programme management and portfolio management,
critically assess the relationship between business strategy, portfolios, programmes and projects,
apply the lexicon or project, programme and portfolio management,
evaluate project management tools and techniques, and be aware of their intelligent application and limitations,
assess appropriate use of a range of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills to a variety of project scenarios,
recognise what is meant by appropriate governance (including leadership) in project and programme management and be able to define the responsibilities of key players,
be aware of published guidance on project (APM, OGC, PMI), programme (MSP) and portfolio (MoP) management.
 

Your career

The course aims to ensure that graduates are better prepared to tackle the current and emerging demands of defence and security.  Given the rapidly changing nature of this environment the education will allow graduates to recognise emerging trends and respond effectively and proactively.  As the course ties together a broad technical and business base and is supported by a wide range of public and private sector organisations the qualification will be noteworthy on the CV’s of those wishing to move into strategic and operational positions in the defence and security sector. 

How to apply

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview. Applicants based outside of the UK may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.