This course is specifically designed for those needing strategic level skills and knowledge to effectively develop and implement plans in the security sector. Enabling participants to analyse, evaluate and communicate emerging security challenges within state, regional, national and international frameworks.

At a glance

  • Start dateAcademic Year 2018/19
  • DurationMSc Executive/Part-time Blended Learning Programme: two years, plus a dissertation. PgDip: Up to 18 months. PgCert: Up to one year.
  • DeliveryComprehensive online learning resources with opportunities for collaborative group work at residential schools, together with assignments and an individual project dissertation.
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeExecutive / Part-time

Who is it for?

This course is suitable for those with a keen academic and practical interest in responding to the challenges associated with security sector reform. You might be an official in a government department or a member of the security forces, or an aspirant for leadership in an international organisation, an international NGO or in civil society.  The course is also relevant to those who wish to enhance their knowledge and skills based on a related first degree, or those seeking to pursue a career in the fields of human security or national security.

Why this course?

By the end of their course of study, graduates will be able to:

  • Understand the nature of security challenges at a strategic level for greater stability in a national and international context;
  • Know how to evaluate, plan, implement, monitor and manage the effective governance of national security policy;
  • Harness human, and other resources, in response to security challenges and lead in their management, including when transformation is the object;
  • Demonstrate transferable skills in project and programme management for effective state-building in the security sector;
  • Underpin their knowledge and skills with authoritative, evidence-based understanding of the discourse, theories and good practices of security sector management and communicate these in written and spoken form with effect.

Your teaching team

You will be taught be faculty staff from Cranfield University, many of whom have international recognition as thought-leaders in their subjects. Others have extensive field experience as well as academic credentials.  All are research active and use it to inform their teaching and keep it up-to-date.

Current staff include:

Professor Ann Fitz-Gerald

Professor Ron Matthews

Dr Bill Egginton

Paula Macphee

Dr Tom O’Brien

Dr Gemma Collantes-Celador

Christopher Taylor

Dr Bryan Watters OBE

Edith Wilkinson

Dr Alex Neads

Dr Nikki Williams

Dr Natalie Clewley


Course details

NOTE: Cranfield University believes that our academic provision should remain current and relevant and to achieve this we periodically review and update our courses. The MSc Security Sector Management course is currently undergoing such a review and this may mean some changes are made before the next academic year. Applicants will be kept informed of these exciting new developments before an offer of admission to the course is made.

This course is offered as an executive part-time blended learning programme combining residential sessions, each consisting of two modules, at either end of the taught phase of the course with distance learning for the remaining 8 modules. The awards of MSc, PgDip and PgCert all apply to the blended learning option.

Postgraduate certificate: Requires the completion of Module 1 and 2, plus 4 other modules. Postgraduate diploma: Requires the completion of all modules. Masters of Science: Requires the completion of all modules as well as a 20,000-word research dissertation.

Individual project

The dissertation phase of the course for MSc students gives them the opportunity to research and write up to 20,000 words on a security topic of their choice.  It could well be related to their regular work and will take approximately 6 months to complete.  It will allow the student to explore their chosen interest by thought, wide reading, research, debate and discussion, supported by an academic supervisor with knowledge of the general topic, in order to produce a document of academic and practical value.

Assessment

Comprehensive online learning resources with opportunities for collaborative group work at residential schools, together with assignments and an individual project dissertation.

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the core modules and some optional modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Module Delivery

This executive part-time course is now delivered as a blended learning programme, with eight of the twelve modules provided via distance learning. The first two modules will be taught at a short residential session at Cranfield Defence and Security, based at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom. The following eight modules will then be delivered at distance using online resources, internet links and our expanded electronic library. Finally, the two remaining modules will be taught at another short residential session at Cranfield University, in Bedford.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Issues in International Security Development and Conflict

Module Leader
  • Professor Ann Fitz-Gerald
Aim

    The module will give a broad understanding of the environment in which a wide range of multilateral, national and non-state actors, public and private sector organisations in both developed and developing countries address broader security, development and post conflict reconstruction challenges.

Syllabus

    Indicative content:

    • contemporary security and development theories,
    • issues and trends in state building and state formation,
    • global, national and human security trends,
    • the role played by the security sector in a range of different transitional contexts,
    • the international security architecture:  multilateral, regional, sub-regional and national security actors,
    • the relationship between security and development,
    • macro-government security policy and implementation frameworks.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module, a student should be able to:

  • discuss the evolution of security theory and the main contributions made by international development and conflict management domains of knowledge.
  • critically evaluate the role of state and non-state security sectors and the constituent elements of the sectors across different transitional societies.
  • critically analyse the role played by international, regional and sub-regional security organisations.
  • give reasons of how international security management issues go beyond national boundaries and impact regional and sub-regional structures.
  • critically evaluate a country’s overall security sector and assess the challenges it poses to the wider development agenda.

Academic Skills and Critical Thinking

Module Leader
  • Paula MacPhee
Aim
    The aim of the module is to give students an understanding of academic research and the requisite study skills to perform effectively at Masters level.
Syllabus
    Indicative content:
    • Key skills for studying at masters level
    • Tools for developing critical thinking
    • Tools for developing critical reading
    • Tools for developing critical writing
    • Developing evidence-based arguments
    • What is research and why do it?
    • Research design
    • Research ethics
    • How to use literature
    • Academic referencing
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Compare different approaches to research
  • Appraise what makes ‘good research’
  • Select and apply appropriate criteria to evaluate the quality of a piece of
  • research
  • critically analyse literature relevant to field of study
  • construct effective evidence based arguments and counter arguments

Strategic Planning for Security and Development

Module Leader
  • Professor Ann Fitz-Gerald
Aim

    The aim of this module is to develop knowledge and understanding of the philosophies and methodologies in strategic management within the context of both the private and public dimensions of the security sector.

Syllabus
    • The importance of strategic management in national security planning
    • Critical evaluation of strategic management philosophies and their evolution
    • Exploration of models of strategic management
    • Critical analysis of strategic management tools such as SWOT analysis, PEST, Porter 5 forces model, Value chains, Portfolio analysis, Stakeholder analysis
    • Understanding the strategy process including the following core elements: strategic analysis, strategy selection and strategy implementation
    • The application of conceptual knowledge to national security planning and implementation
    • Linkages between strategic management and change management in transitional societies
    • Drivers for and barriers to change, including issues such as strategic drift, process vs. content, causes of resistance (enablers and disablers).
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding and knowledge of the drivers behind the evolution of strategy models
  • Understanding the utility of strategic management in the development and implementation of national security policy
  • Critically evaluate the utility of a range of analytical tools
  • Apply a strategic analysis framework to a given security sector situation
  • Identify and understand the key issues associated with change management
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of the application of change management principles in order to deliver strategy
  • Demonstrate an ability to conduct independent learning through use of the study pack and peer debate
  • Critically evaluate academic papers and produce coherent arguments in written form for a specialist and non-specialist audience
  • Develop effective oral communication skills through the delivery of case analysis and presentations.

Governance and Rule of Law

Module Leader
  • Dr Gemma Collantes Celador
Aim
    This module provides students with the opportunity to engage theoretically and empirically with the growing use of the concepts of governance and the rule of law to think, plan, deliver and regulate the security sector and security policy more generally.
Syllabus
    The aim of this module is to provide students with the theoretical knowledge and analytical tools to understand and critically engage with two fundamental concepts within the study and practice of security, development and transitions away from conflict and state fragility: Governance and the Rule of Law. It will introduce different definitions, theoretical traditions and approaches to the study of these two concepts. It will explore how our understanding of these two concepts relates to notions of ‘order’, ‘control’, ‘power’, ‘social management’ when understanding the relationship between state and society in democratic settings, and how this then translates into specific expectations for the security sector (in terms of place in society, roles to perform, who are legitimate actors in the security realm, internal and external regulatory frameworks). The conceptual material students will be expected to engage with will draw from International Relations and political science but also global governance, security studies, legal studies.

    Emphasis will also be placed on linking theory with policy and practice by highlighting the role that the concepts of the Rule of Law and Governance play within the agendas of a range of actors (local, national, regional and international) and issue-areas within security sector management but also national security policy, state-building and nation-building processes. Examples include, among others, corruption fighting, human rights promotion and transitional justice measures for the security sector, Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR) processes.

    The cultural roots of the concepts of Governance and the Rule of Law and the international drivers that are increasingly behind them will also be critically analysed. This will take place as part of a discussion on the challenges and unintended consequences one can observe in contemporary security-related measures pursued as part of conflict management and development processes/initiatives in various parts of the world. 
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:

Knowledge and Understanding

  • Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the role that both governance and the rule of law play in the management of the security sector, and security policy more generally, in a democracy.
  • Apply critically different theories and approaches to the study of governance and the rule of law showing awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, and political uses.
  • Conceptualise the relationship between responsibility, accountability, transparency and oversight when evaluating security governance in theory and practice.
  • Analyse the role that different actors (local, national, regional and international; public and private; political/economic/judicial/societal) and contextual factors do and/or should play when designing, implementing and evaluating measures related to the governance of the security sector and security policy more generally.
  • Examine the need to supplement formal rule of law mechanisms with informal social structures and processes.
  • Demonstrate in-depth knowledge of the challenges – but also possible solutions – which arise when managing the security sector in a law-based state. 

Skills

  • Formulate clear arguments in written and oral format.
  • Gather, retrieve, synthesise and critically evaluate information from a number of primary and secondary sources in order to adequately engage with a range of complex issues in the study of security governance and the rule of law.
  • Use theories and concepts with consistency and rigour, in written and oral format. 
  • Produce written materials that indicate in a precise and honest manner what is the student’s work and what is attributable to others.

Strategic Leadership and Change Management

Module Leader
Aim

    To provide knowledge and understanding of the important role of leadership and change management and allow the evaluation of leadership and change management theory in a range of group discussions, exercises and case studies.

Syllabus

    The module will comprise a combination of plenary lectures, case studies, practical exercises and, where possible, visiting speakers. The overarching approach to learning will have a strong practitioner element and key curriculum topics will include:

    • Security sector relationship between Leadership, Management, and Command and the link to the business space through the New Public Management (NPM) movement
    • Theories of leadership – including the fields of sociology, behavioural psychology, and military history. Leadership failure and toxic leadership and its impact in the security sector will be examined
    • Theories and models for leading and managing change including resistance to change and the sustainability of change
    • The role of culture in leadership and change
    • Role of innovation in the security sector.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

  • Recognise the impact of New Public Management in the Security Sector
  • Distinguish between leadership theories and evaluate their relevance to the business space in the security sector
  • Distinguish between change theories and evaluate their relevance to the business space in the security sector
  • Recognise the difference between Command, Leadership, and Management
  • Identify the key models used in planned organisational change and critically evaluate their relevance and risk
  • Identify the role of culture in leadership and change
  • Identify the potential role of innovation in the Security Sector.

Building State Capacity

Module Leader
Aim

    This module will provide students with contextual, theoretical and practical understandings of the challenges in building state capacity. It will link theory and concepts with policy and practice on state and institution building and the expose the challenges associated with capacity building. It will examine the various characteristics of states and institutions and challenge conventional approaches to concepts of capacity building, state legitimacy and authority. Lastly, the module will provide students with the essential tools that enable situation analysis, skills and knowledge transfer especially appropriate to a fragile and conflict affected situation.

Syllabus
    • Definitions, Theories and Concepts of state building and state formation including legitimacy and accountability
    • The potential contribution and relevance of the development community to capacity building theories and approaches: people-centred development, sustainability. local ownership, participatory approaches, power, empowerment
    • Dilemmas and contradictions in capacity building
    • Typologies of capacity building: institutional, civil society, political, advocacy
    • Stabilisation as the ‘new state building’
    • Tools for Knowledge and skills transfer: Capacities and vulnerabilities analysis, Participatory self assessment, gap analysis
    • Case Study of OSCE Capacity-Building in Police Reform in Kosovo
    • Case Study of support to the Office of the National Security Council in Afghanistan
    • The module will provide a ‘chapeau’ for, and link into, the Modules on Project and Programme Management and Managing and Measuring Security Sector Resources, to support capacity strengthening, development and building
    • An understanding of the theories of legitimacy and constitutional engineering pertaining to institutional capacity building.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

  • Describe the main theoretical underpinnings and the relevant supporting international policy frameworks
  • Demonstrate an understanding of, and appreciate the approaches and sensitivities to capacity building
  • Understand the main literature regarding legitimacy and its relationship with governance
  • Critically analyse the theory and practice of capacity building
  • Based on real life case studies, trial the normative frameworks and methodologies for building state capacity.

The Economics of Security

Module Leader
  • Professor Ron Matthews
Aim

    The module will provide a contextual, theoretical and practical understanding of the economic and financial aspects of the security-development nexus.

Syllabus

    The global post-war economy is characterised by both rapidly escalating research, technology and acquisition expenditure and taut, if not declining, national development and security budgets. These twin pressures have forced policy-makers to focus on achieving the goal of ‘affordability’ through value-for-money initiatives. However, efficient management of scarce national resources at the ‘Departmental’ level is not undertaken in isolation from broader economic influences. Thus, in the contemporary study of development economics, it is essential to examine the contributions made by Foreign Direct Investment (FDI), the trade-offs between security and defence expenditure and economic growth, the economic dimensions of civil integration into the broader defence and security sector, particularly focused on the role of offsets in economic development.

    Content

    • The role of economics in security
    • Managing scarce resources
    • Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and development strategies
    • The impact of the “rich nations, strong armies” phenomenon
    • International economic dynamics of security
    • Nature of the development 'Eco-system'
    • Evaluation of the trade-off between security expenditure and economic growth
    • Exploring the economic dimensions of civil integration in the security sector
    • Dynamics of industrialisation in both the advanced and developing countries
    • The notion of globalisation and the changing nature of security organisation and production structures, including technology-sharing
    • Security-related counter-trade, embracing detailed evaluation of offsets
    • Unique characteristics of International markets
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

  • Understand and have the skills to evaluate the dynamic changes impacting on the global development environmental map.
  • Analyse the industrial consolidation, commercialisation and collaborative policies and trends shaping global defence and security industrial practices.
  • Critically examine the policies and effectiveness of technology-development - sharing and -transfer in the global context.

Managing Risk

Module Leader
  • Edith Wilkinson
Aim

    Risk and security sector managers need essential tools to contribute to the strategic decision-making of their organisations. This module provides an understanding of the importance and limitations of risk management and risk assessment methodologies, particularly as these apply in transitional and uncertain environments.

Syllabus
    • Basic concepts, definitions and tools of risk management
    • Conducting a political or strategic risk analysis
    • Cultural and psychological factors affecting risk perception
    • Case studies in risk communication
    • Constituents of security
    • Risk and the use of conditionalities
    • Key responsibilities, legislation and regulation
    • Protection, deterrence, detection and investigation
    • Understanding organisational aims and strategies.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Distinguish risks and differentiate hazard and uncertainty
  • Understand risk as an evolving and contested concept
  • Recall and use basic risk management tools
  • Appreciate risk as an opportunity as well as a threat
  • Identify psychological, cultural and social factors shaping risk
  • Develop effective risk communication strategies
  • Contextualise security in a broader framework
  • Articulate the key drivers of security risk management
  • Identify, prioritise and evaluate security risks
  • Operationalise security risk management procedures
  • Appreciate the role of technology in security management
  • Communicate the security function in business terms.

Managing Information Security

Module Leader
Aim

    This module aims to develop a wider understanding of the context of information security. It examines the operational aspects of cyber in relation to information and security within the national context. The module will provide a broad understanding of the relationship between cyber as a tool for growth of information management and the associated risks.

Syllabus

    Mapping the landscape of cyber, cyber security and information assurance including:

    • Terminology.
    • History.
    • The human aspects.


     The management and governance of information:

    • Risk management.
    • Cyber policy development and analysis.


     The role of cyber and information management in critical national infrastructure (CNI) including:

    • Interdependence of systems.
    • Identification of need for, and the management of, resilience.


     The role of information and cyber-security in nation state development including:

    • As a tool for social mobilisation e.g. social media.
    • As a threat to national stability e.g. terrorist usage of information and systems.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module a student should be able to:


  • Critically assess current research on cyber and cyber strategy development.
  • Critically evaluate theories of criticality and interdependency in the context of information management.
  • Assess the societal impact of cyber and information security.
  • Evaluate the information management concepts in relation to a nation state.
  • Evaluate the opportunities and limitations afforded by emergent cyber technologies.

Managing Security Sector Resources: People, Organisations and Performance

Module Leader
  • Professor Frank Horwitz
Aim

    This module is suitable for policy makers and practitioners working in the area of security sector governance, development, national security, and conflict analysis. The course aims to explore key issues in the role of capacity building and its relationship with human resource management (HRM), organisational behaviour and performance management concepts from an intercultural perspective. In particular it assesses the work implications of cultural differences in motivation, communication, performance and leadership styles. The impact of cultural norms on ethics and change management approaches is also examined. Further, in light of the important role of performance management and the measuring and monitoring of desirable outcomes driving change management interventions, appropriate performance methodologies and frameworks will also be introduced in this module.

Syllabus
    • Human resource management trends in the wider security sector
    • Organisational structures and promoting behavioural change
    • Employee motivation - the psychological vs the employment contract
    • Culturally sensitive change management
    • Trends in performance measurement
    • Benefits management
    • Excellence model
    • Logical frameworks and logic maps
    • Balanced Scorecard.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Understand and be able to explain different aspects of national culture and its implications for international and national security organisations in terms of:
    • The role of HRM in strategic security sector management
    • Employee motivation approaches
    • Appropriate leadership styles
    • Communication processes
  • Understand the criteria for success in intercultural teams in terms of composition and process
  • Adopt culturally sensitive solutions to differing standards of business and service sector ethics across countries
  • Plan and provide a process methodology for implementing change (incremental and transformational) in different organisational/cultural contexts
  • Measure the strategic and programme performance of different security sector actors and institutions
  • Adopt a strategic perspective to the multidisciplinary challenges associated with the development and life-cycle management of global security sector development processes
  • Apply the skills to determine the benefits, outcomes and deliverables from implementation of these techniques, identifying potential problems in the process.

Managing Security Sector Projects and Programmes

Module Leader
  • Dr Bill Egginton
Aim

    The module will establish and reaffirm a baseline of student knowledge and understanding of the fundamental principles of project and programme management and explore the key
    principles, processes, tools and techniques underpinning project and programme management in the context of Security and Development Sector.

Syllabus

    The module will comprise a combination of plenary lectures and discussions, case studies and practical exercises. The overarching approach to learning will be problem based and experiential. Key curriculum topics will include:

    • Strategy and the Project Life Cycle
    • Business Case
    • Scope Management and Scheduling
    • Budget and Cash Flow
    • Estimating
    • Risk Management
    • Organisation Structures & Roles
    • Soft Skills (inc. teamwork, communication and leadership)
    • Multi-cultural management
    • Programme Management
    • Introduction to portfolio management.
Intended learning outcomes
  • Understand the basic theoretical concepts that underpin effective project management and its links to programme management
  • Describe published Bodies of Knowledge and distinguish between BoKs (APM, PMI) and a method (PRINCE2, MSP)
  • Explain the lifecycle approach, its principles, application and benefits
  • Understand the relationship between business strategies, portfolios, programmes and projects
  • Critique project management tools and techniques, and be aware of their intelligent application and limitations
  • Assess appropriate use of a range of ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills to a variety of project scenarios
  • Recognise what is meant by appropriate governance in project and programme management and be able to define the responsibilities of key players.

Environmental Security

Module Leader
  • Dr Thomas O'Brien
Aim

    This module examines the concept and reality of environmental security, providing students with an understanding of the challenges presented by environmental change and degradation to state and human security. It links theory and concepts, with policy and practice, to demonstrate how states and other factors have sought to deal with such challenges both now and in the future.

Syllabus

    Indicative content:

    • Definitions, theories and concepts.
    • Categories of environmental security threat – disasters and resource scarcity.
    • Significance of state capacity, or lack of, to manage environmental security challenges and provide security to impacted communities.
    • The complicated relationship between environment, conflict and cooperation between communities and states.
    • Examining the interrelationship between environmental security and human security.
    • Ecological security – making environment the referent actor and considering the costs of security.
    • The role of complexity and ecosystem design in managing security in relation to environmental threats and challenges.
    • Climate change as an environmental security challenge.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module, a student should be able to:


  • Describe the key features of environmental security.
  • Differentiate between disaster forms and identify their significance in the context of environmental security.
  • Identify the significance of environmental security in relation to state and human security approaches.
  • Analyse the relationship between food and environmental security.
  • Relate systems thinking to the development and management of environmental security.
  • Critically evaluate the role of the state and key international actors in environmental security.
  • Compare and contrast the impact of environmental events on the security of different referent actors (state, community, individual, and environment).
  • Synthesise the literature on environmental security and be able to explain the key elements in specific contexts.

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.


MSc Part-time £19,000 *
PgDip Part-time £15,300 *
PgCert Part-time £7,650 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments, up to a maximum of two payments per year; first payment on or before registration and the second payment six months after the course start date. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2018 and 31 July 2019.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • For self-funded applicants a non-refundable £500 deposit is payable on offer acceptance and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.




MSc Part-time £19,000 *
PgDip Part-time £15,300 *
PgCert Part-time £7,650 *
  • * Fees can be paid in full up front, or in equal annual instalments, up to a maximum of two payments per year; first payment on or before registration and the second payment six months after the course start date. Students who complete their course before the initial end date will be invoiced the outstanding fee balance and must pay in full prior to graduation.

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2018 and 31 July 2019.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • For self-funded applicants a non-refundable £500 deposit is payable on offer acceptance and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.




Funding Opportunities

Postgraduate Loan from Student Finance England 
A Postgraduate Loan is now available for UK and EU applicants to help you pay for your Master’s course. You can apply for a loan at GOV.UK

Future Finance Student Loans
Future Finance offer student loans of up to £40,000 that can cover living costs and tuition fees for all student at Cranfield University.

Please contact studentfunding@cranfield.ac.uk for more information on funding.



Entry requirements

A first or second class Honours degree in an appropriate discipline, or equivalent, plus relevant postgraduate professional experience.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Security clearance for Shrivenham

Some Cranfield University courses are delivered at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham which is a Ministry of Defence (MOD) site. All applicants to courses that are wholly or partially delivered at Shrivenham must complete the BPSS (HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard V4 April 2014) prior to registration on the course or must already hold a security clearance to this level or higher.

Please visit our security clearance page for further information.


Isidore Edet

I found my course at Cranfield challenging but rewarding, and my qualification and experience are very useful.

Isidore Edet, Commander of the Nigerian Army Corps of Infantry

Applying

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview. Applicants based outside of the UK may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.

Apply now