This course considers some of the most pressing issues of world politics such as the causes of war and peace, the pressures and opportunities of globalisation, the threats posed by terrorism, and the problems of global poverty and injustice.

At a glance

  • Start dateSeptember
  • DurationMSc: One year full-time. PgCert/PgDip: Up to one year full-time.
  • DeliveryThere are a variety of assessment methods including written assignments, individual and group presentations, dissertation and examinations.
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time

Who is it for?

This course is intended to attract students who are either currently employed in posts relating to Security Cooperation or those individuals who generally have an interest in issues pertaining to defence and security.

Students come from the following areas:

  • Serving members of the UK MOD (civilian and military)
  • Foreign MOD civil servants and members of foreign armed forces
  • Staff from other UK and foreign government departments, as well as international
  • Governmental and non-governmental organisations, who have an identified need to develop their knowledge of Defence and Security
  • Civilians with an interest in defence and security.

There is often a wide range of nationalities on the course, with a maximum of 30 places available.

Why this course?

The course content is dynamic, challenging, and cutting edge, designed to equip you with the skills and insights needed to understand and authoritatively analyse contemporary debates in international relations using a mixture of theoretical and empirical tools to deal with and confront the challenges presented by contemporary world politics.

The course draws upon our established expertise in international security, foreign and defence policy analysis, security studies, international law, conflict resolution, and environmental issues.

Course details

The course consists of three core modules and a wide range of elective modules, of which you must pass seven, followed by a dissertation.

Assessment

There are a variety of assessment methods including written assignments, individual and group presentations, dissertation and examinations.

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the core modules and some optional modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2016–2017. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2017 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Core modules

Academic Skills and Critical Thinking

Module Leader
Aim
    The aim of the module is to give students an understanding of academic research and the requisite study skills to perform effectively at Masters level.
Syllabus
    Indicative content:
    • Key skills for studying at masters level
    • Tools for developing critical thinking
    • Tools for developing critical reading
    • Tools for developing critical writing
    • Developing evidence-based arguments
    • What is research and why do it?
    • Research design
    • Research ethics
    • How to use literature
    • Academic referencing
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Compare different approaches to research
  • Appraise what makes ‘good research’
  • Select and apply appropriate criteria to evaluate the quality of a piece of
  • research
  • critically analyse literature relevant to field of study
  • construct effective evidence based arguments and counter arguments

Issues in International Security, Conflict and Development

Module Leader
  • Dr Thomas O'Brien
Aim

    The module will give a broad understanding of the environment in which a wide range of multilateral, national, and non-state actors public and private sector organisations in both developed and developing countries address broader security, development and post conflict reconstruction challenges.

Syllabus
    • Defining security
    • International relations theory
    • Global, national and human security trends
    • Assessing the risks to security
    • The concept of state-building and state formation
    • Challenges of state-building in the 'non-Weberian' state, and the need for local political legitimacy
    • Post-conflict security and international interventions
    • The impact of the securitisation of the human security agenda
    • Geopolitical trends and implications for state security sectors and sub-regional efforts to promote peace and security
    • The relationship between security and development
    • Macro-government security policy and implementation frameworks
    • Key actors, roles and responsibilities across the international, regional and subregional security communities.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Apply relevant theories to the analysis of security, conflict and development
  • Critically analyse trends with the human security domain
  • Identify threats to security
  • Appraise the role of state and non-state security actors within difference transitional societies
  • Recognise the contribution of both political and management science to the analysis of international security
  • Critically analyse the role played by international, regional and sub-regional security organisations
  • Demonstrate how international security management issues go beyond national boundaries and impact regional and sub-regional structures
  • Critically evaluate a country's overall security sector and assess the challenges it poses to the wider development agenda
  • Communicate effectively to a specialised and non-specialised audience the concepts and findings associated with international security.

Defence in the 21st Century

Module Leader
  • Cleary, Dr Laura L.J.R.
Aim

    To understand the changing nature of civil-military relations, and in the process identify the likely roles for defence forces in the 21st Century.

Syllabus
    • The theories of civil-military relations
    • The role(s) of armed forces in democracies and other regime types
    • Why do armies engage in coups d’état?
    • Introduction to the governance and management of defence
    • The domestic legal framework for defence
    • The international legal framework for defence.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Critically assess and apply the theories which underpin the study of civil-military relations
  • Analyse the dominant trends in civil-military relations
  • Compare and contrast civil-military relations in different regions of the world
  • Recognise the legal constraints on the use of force.

Electives

Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    To develop a systematic understanding of institutions and processes of diplomacy, regional integration and global governance thus enabling participants to evaluate the dynamics of conflicts and to determine feasible methods of resolution.

Syllabus
    • Historical and comparative approaches to diplomacy
    • Diplomatic theory and practice
    • Conflict dynamics and conflict typology
    • Case study analysis of different regional conflicts and peace processes
    • Theories and practices of peacekeeping
    • Developing a conflict prevention plan and the preventive measures matrix.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Identify the historical and contemporary conditions in which particular diplomatic processes and strategies can be assessed.
  • Assess major humanitarian and political issues through the application of knowledge of diplomacy.
  • Model the evolution of conflicts using relevant data, concepts and models.
  • Recognise existing mechanisms for conflict prevention and resolution and evaluate and appraise their limitations.
  • Critically evaluate different peace processes.
  • Draw conclusions and communicate policy-relevant recommendations for conflict transformation and resolution, individually and by working with others.
  • Validate extant theories and practices of conflict prevention.
  • Identify and select preventive measures and means for the nonviolent resolution of conflicts.
  • Develop and explain conflict prevention plans.

Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context

Module Leader
  • Cleary, Dr Laura L.J.R.
Aim

    The module will enhance the student’s knowledge, professional understanding and analytical skills necessary to improve and/or transform the governance and management of their defence and security systems.

Syllabus
    • Security within the international context
    • Evolution of the state and current challenges to state sovereignty
    • Governance of Defence (including sessions on accountability, policy formation, leadership and ethics)
    • Management of Defence (including sessions on strategic analysis and planning, risk management, acquisition, project management, finance, HRM and change management).
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Understand current security concepts, systems and issues
  • Identify key challenges faced by specified security sector stakeholders
  • Evaluate existing security systems
  • Evaluate current governance concepts, systems and challenges
  • Recognise the relationship between good governance, good leadership and good management in the provision of enhanced security
  • Relate the theoretical concepts of governance to the realities of the civil-military relationship within selected states
  • Understand current management concepts, systems and challenges as they apply to the management of defence
  • Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of selected defence management theories and practices
  • Identify appropriate leadership philosophies and management practices to advance security sector development.

International Law and Armed Conflicts

Module Leader
Aim

    The module will enable participants to evaluate and explain authoritatively the significance of international law as it relates to armed conflicts and the deployment of military forces on operations overseas, in terms of both the authority to use force unilaterally or in the maintenance of collective peace and security, and the conduct of hostilities once force is being used.

Syllabus
    • The historical evolution of international attitudes to the legality of the use of force
    • The law of self-defence
    • Humanitarian intervention, armed reprisals and hot pursuit
    • Collective security enforcement, peace enforcement and peacekeeping
    • The scope of application of international humanitarian law
    • Sources and fundamental principles of international humanitarian law
    • Personal status of combatants and civilians
    • Protection of persons and objects in armed conflicts
    • Methods and means of warfare; the law and targeting operations
    • Securing compliance with international humanitarian law
    • Command responsibility.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate expertise on current research on legal aspects of the use of force and the conduct of military operations and be able to relate this to research in other areas of defence and security studies
  • Monitor, analyse, interpret and evaluate contemporary international security and armed conflict events and developments with reference to international law, and to reach provisional legal conclusions on the conduct of such operations as they unfold and before the full range of facts and other data are available
  • Demonstrate the ability to articulate the complexities of legal debates surrounding the use of force and the conduct of military operations in terminology appropriate to the subject, but in a clear and readily understood manner to a non-expert audience.

International Criminal Law and Human Rights

Module Leader
  • Turns, Mr David D.W.
Aim

    The module will enable participants to evaluate and explain authoritatively the ways in which international law, particularly as it affects the armed and security forces, can be enforced by means of individual criminal responsibility and liability for human rights violations, and the procedures whereby such enforcement is achieved.

Syllabus
    • State and criminal individual responsibility 
    • State criminal jurisdiction and immunities
    • International co-operation: extradition and abuse of process
    • International tribunals and the International Criminal Court
    • International crimes: from piracy to aggression
    • Principles of criminal liability and defences
    • International and regional regimes of human rights law
    • Human rights in the UK: the Human Rights Act 1998
    • The right to life
    • Freedom from torture, inhuman and degrading treatment and punishment
    • The right to liberty and security of the person
    • Terrorism and derogations from human rights
    • The application of human rights to armed forces on operations overseas: extraterritorial jurisdiction
    • Human rights of the armed forces.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate expertise on current research on legal aspects of international criminal justice and the protection of human rights, particularly insofar as they relate to operations by the armed and security forces, and be able to relate this to research in other areas of defence and security studies.
  • Monitor, analyse, interpret and evaluate contemporary international security events and developments with reference to international criminal and human rights law, and to reach provisional legal conclusions on the application of those laws to such operations as they unfold and before the full range of facts and other data are available.
  • Demonstrate the ability to articulate the complexities of legal debates surrounding the search for international criminal justice and the protection of human rights in terminology appropriate to the subject, but in a clear and readily understood manner to a non-expert audience.

Intelligence in International Security

Module Leader
  • Dr Thomas O'Brien
Aim

    The module will provide students with an understanding of the role and limitations of intelligence in support of decision-making in the contemporary international security environment.

Syllabus
    • Introduction to intelligence: what is it; why is it, so what?
    • Intelligence taxonomy: sources; disciplines; and agencies
    • The intelligence process: the intelligence cycle; the network-centric model; and the intelligence commons
    • National intelligence systems: structures; and cultures
    • The Cold War: as secret intelligence war; as setting for the contemporary intelligence function; and who really won the Cold War?
    • Intelligence ‘failure’ and ‘success’: key case studies (Barbarossa, Pearl Harbor' Falkland Islands, Iraq); human factors; decision-making
    • ‘Spies only know secrets’:  OSINT: what is it; what can it do; so what?
    • Information working in the ‘Information Age’: from data to wisdom; knowledge working; and new social media
    • Contemporary intelligence issues: politicisation; secrecy, security, sharing; information overload; competition; forces of change; prediction; risk; and, ethics.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Apply relevant theories to the analysis of security, conflict and development
  • Critically analyse trends with the human security domain
  • Identify threats to security
  • Appraise the role of state and non-state security actors within difference transitional societies
  • Recognise the contribution of both political and management science to the analysis of international security
  • Critically analyse the role played by international, regional and sub-regional security organisations
  • Demonstrate how international security management issues go beyond national boundaries and impact regional and sub-regional structures
  • Critically evaluate a country's overall security sector and assess the challenges it poses to the wider development agenda
  • Communicate effectively to a specialised and non-specialised audience the concepts and findings associated with international security.

Terrorism and Counter-Terrorism

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    The module will enable participants to analyse and explain current conceptual thinking regarding the nature of terrorism, its origins, motivations and manifestations, together with an in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the counterterrorism approaches and strategies adopted by democracies and how these differ from those adopted by non-democracies.

Syllabus
    • Understanding terrorism:
      • Definitional issues
      • Conceptual approaches to terrorism
      • The origins and use of terrorism throughout history
      • The nature and causes of terrorism.
    • Understanding terrorists:
      • The origins, motivations and manifestations of terrorist groups
      • Terrorist organisations and networks
      • The process of radicalisation
      • The terrorist threat at the start of the 21st Century
      • Assessing the success and failure of terrorist groups.
    • Counter-terrorism approaches and strategies:
      • Assumptions, aims, frameworks and principles
      • CT strategies, globally, regionally and nationally
      • The CT 'Toolkit'.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current conceptual thinking regarding the phenomenon of terrorism and the threat that it poses, graphically, orally and in writing
  • Evaluate terrorist groups in terms of their type, techniques, manifestations and success or otherwise, both today and in the past
  • Critique extant counter-terrorism approaches and strategies and evaluate their relative merits in the context of democratic values and human rights
  • Demonstrate creativity and originality in the development of policy relevant recommendations in the fields of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Regional Security

Module Leader
  • Podder, Dr Sukanya S.
Aim

    The module will enable participants to analyse, explain and make well-founded policy recommendations regarding current and future regional security issues.

Syllabus

    This module will introduce students to the study of regional security and conflict analysis, a subfield of security studies. The student will first be introduced to the main theoretical approaches to the study of regional security and the role of regional security organisations. 

    These theoretical approaches will be contrasted to approaches focused on international security, and we will ask why it is valuable to study security at the regional level of analysis. Theoretically and empirically, the course will investigate the processes of regionalisation of security that have taken place since the end of the Cold War's global superpower rivalry. It will debate the tensions between regional and globalisation trends and their impact on state sovereignty. 

    The module will also discuss how regional security integration can be achieved and indeed whether such an achievement would be desirable from the perspective of promoting peace and security. The empirical focus of the course in on regionalism in the developing world. The students will be asked to apply their theoretical knowledge to the regional cases. Through such an empirical analysis students will be able to develop linkages between security consideration and how these relate to priorities in foreign policy making.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the main theories of regional security; especially Regional Security Complex Theory and the Security Communities approach
  • Examine how historical, geographical, environmental, political and leadership factors influence the security paradigm in regions
  • Explain the key processes of, and implications of, the regionalisation of security after the end of the Cold War
  • Assess the global interests of the United States and other Great Powers in different regions
  • Evaluate the role of regional organisations such in addressing regional and local security problems 
  • Critically assess these theories and interpretations in light of the empirical study of two regions; South Asia and West Africa.

International Interventions for Peace and Statebuilding

Module Leader
  • Podder, Dr Sukanya S.
Aim

    The module will provide students with a theoretical, empirical and comparative introduction to the key concepts, debates and assumptions underlying international approaches to peace and statebuilding.

Syllabus
    • Basic concepts, conditions and factors motivating international intervention
    • Actors: international, regional, national and local
    • Peacebuilding strategy: approaches and critiques
    • Statebuilding: policies, approaches and lessons
    • Contextual specificity versus global templates
    • Simulation on security, justice and governance reform
    • Bottom up approaches: community recovery in theory and practice
    • Implications for post conflict development.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Compare and contrast international responses to peacebuilding and statebuilding
  • Identify challenges to international interventions from a number of perspectives
  • Create and adapt a basic plan for intervention and post conflict development
  • Develop logical planning skills for contextual analysis that can be implemented in practice
  • Assess the merits and challenges of adopting a top down versus bottom up approach
  • Evaluate the impact and consequences of international interventions in security, justice, governance and community recovery from a range of perspective.

Managing Natural Disasters

Module Leader
  • Dr Thomas O'Brien
Aim

    This module aims to provide deeper theoretical and practical understanding to the students by addressing the most basic questions: what is a natural disaster? And how disasters can be managed? To seek these answers this module adopts a multi-disciplinary and inter disciplinary approach in advancing students’ knowledge and understanding of the hazards, disasters, risk, security, disaster management, and the specific ways households, communities and organisations respond, mitigate and cope.

Syllabus

    The aim of this module is two-fold.  First, this module aims to understand the meaning of disasters by analysing three disaster paradigms including dominant, alternative and mid-range in order to have a fuller theoretical and practical understanding around 'what is a disaster?'  

    Second, this module focuses on the policy and practice of disaster management by taking a nuanced approach.. More concretely UN/ISDR's Disaster Risk Reduction Framework forms the basis of our analysis.  Specific case studies are drawn from the global North and South in order to put theory into practice.  In doing so, this module will give experience in applying different concepts and theoretical perspectives, as a means of learning how to undertake critical and rigorous analysis. 

    Topics that will be covered include:

    • Is the environment becoming more hazardous? Views from the dominant perspective
    • Disasters as social construction: Views from the sociology of disasters
    • Vulnerability analysis in the making of natural disasters
    • Disaster, Risk and Disaster Management
    • Disaster, Development and Livelihood
    • Disaster Management and Personalising Disaster Management
    • Achieving Disaster Resilience.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Develop a basic skill to analyse how and why disasters occur and what is a disaster
  • Understand the nature and context of natural disasters and of effective ways to manage them
  • Recognise linkages between natural disasters and the development process
  • Analyse and explain the nature of a given disaster situation
  • A working knowledge of disaster management structures and national and international systems and of the relevant organisations and institutions
  • Ability to analyse and explain the nature of a given disaster situation, to assess risks and outline effective response patterns.

Weapons of Mass Destruction, Control and Verification

Module Leader
  • Healy, Dr Matthew M.J.F.
Aim

    The module will provide an understanding of the background to International Treaties and Agreements for the Control of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) and will acquaint the student with the methods and objectives of verification techniques and to appreciate the obligations and difficulties of nations holding inspections.

Syllabus

    In the modern age one of the more important mechanisms ensuring defence and security is a proper system of international disarmament treaties and agreements. These can be truly international in scope such as the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC) or the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC). Other agreements can be bilateral or multilateral in nature such as the Start agreements between the US and the Russian Federation as the successor state to the Soviet Union. To generate confidence between the participants these agreements need to be verifiable. Such verification can be carried out bilaterally by the State Parties or an independent international organisation can be set up for the purpose. The International Atomic Energy Authority (IAEA) based in Vienna polices the NPT while the provisions of the CWC are enforced by the International Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Warfare whose headquarters are in the Hague. 

    In the nuclear area the role played by treaties is either to limit the spread of such weapons to non-nuclear states (NPT) or to try to agree some reduction in the number of weapons among possessor states (START). 

    In the chemical and biological field the BTWC and CWC seek to outlaw entirely whole classes of weapons. The CWC does not merely seek to control chemical weapons but insists on possessor states disarming and eliminating such weapons entirely within a set timescale. All industrial chemicals are classified in schedules according to their perceived threat to the Convention. The CWC therefore has profound implications not only for military forces but also for civilian industry. States Parties to the treaty must set up and enshrine in domestic law a national authority whose role is to provide yearly declarations and statistics to the OPCW describing the chemicals produced and the processes used to do so. The CWC inspection regime is an intrusive one and involves both routine and ‘challenge’ inspections. The ability to receive such inspections and to demonstrate compliance with the Treaty provisions while preserving essential industrial and military security requires trained personnel, close liaison with Industry and specialist trained military escort teams. IAEA inspections can also be intrusive but their scope and pattern are narrower and affect fewer installations and establishments.

    Module Contents:

    Chemical, Biological and Toxin (CBT) Weapons

    • Chemistry, biochemistry and Toxicology Primer 
    • Chemicals, toxins and Biological materials that have or might be used in weapons, their nature, toxicology and other properties in as much as these affect the utility or otherwise of the agents as weapons
    • History of Chemical Warfare and CBT weapons
    • Demilitarisation of Weapons and Agents to meet treaty obligations.

    Nuclear

    • Basic Nuclear Science
    • Weapon Design
    • Electromagnetic Effects
    • The Radiation Environment
    • Blast and Thermal Effects.

    Nuclear, Chemical, and Biological Arms Control

    • Overview of N+CBW Arms Control
    • History of Arms control and case studies
    • Chemical Weapons Convention and the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention
    • Nuclear Arms Control Treaties
    • The role of the OPCW and National Authority.

    Inspections and other verification regimes

    • Case Studies.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Provide an overview of the threat posed to world peace and security by weapons of mass destruction
  • Demonstrate an appreciation of the technology necessary to develop weapons of mass destruction, the main types, principles of construction and effect, and the technological and economic barriers that can control their proliferation 
  • Evaluate the international treaties and bi- and multi-lateral agreements that are in place to control WMD
  • Assess the role of the UN, OPCW, IAEA and other international bodies in verification regimes set up to police treaty compliance.

Military Support to Disasters

Module Leader
  • Caddick-Adams, Dr Peter A.P.
Aim

    The module shall demonstrate an understanding of the utility, limitations and availability of military capabilities to enhance disaster preparedness and to support humanitarian/disaster relief operations, in order to provide more resilient national and local capabilities.

Syllabus
    • Disaster preparedness:
      • The requirement
      • Military capabilities which can be used to enhance disaster preparedness, and the planning and use of military capabilities to enhance disaster preparedness
      • Humanitarian/disaster relief.
    • The nature of humanitarian/disaster relief operations:
      • Operational environment
      • Characteristics of humanitarian/disaster relief operations
      • Disaster types.
    • Military capabilities:
      • Assessment / C²
      • Communications support
      • Search and rescue
      • Infrastructure support
      • Transport, supply and distribution
      • Public health / medical.
    • The approach to humanitarian emergencies/disasters:
      • Access by humanitarian and development relief communities to military capabilities
      • Role of the international community
      • Government response
      • Inter-departmental response
      • Legal issues
      • Financial issues.
    • The planning, deployment and use of military capabilities:
      • Assessment of the nature and extent of the disaster
      • Planning considerations
      • Mission analysis and estimate process
      • Civil response to humanitarian emergencies/disasters
      • Military response to humanitarian emergencies/disasters
      • Key tenets of military support
      • Command and control.
    • Security considerations
    • Evaluation of humanitarian response including military support
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Understand the military capabilities to support humanitarian/disaster relief operations
  • Assess the nature and extent of a disaster
  • Recognise the key tenets of effective military support
  • Apply the estimate process to a humanitarian emergency / disaster
  • Plan the deployment of military capabilities
  • Practise command and control of a joint civil-military operation
  • Evaluate humanitarian response including military support and assess the degree to which military support has enhanced resilient national and local capabilities.

Crisis Management

Module Leader
Aim

    The module will provide knowledge and understanding of the theoretical, conceptual and practical aspects of crisis management.

Syllabus

    Crises of all types are a particular challenge to governments, the emergency services, industry and commerce, the military and non-governmental organisation.  Organisations and communities expect their leaders to minimize the impact of any crisis, whilst critics seize the moment to blame governments and senior management for any polices or lack of policies that might have led to the crisis.  In this extreme environment, policy makers and practitioners must somehow establish a sense of normality, and foster a sense of collective learning from the crisis experience.  This particular module will concentrate on the range of crises that broadly come under the heading of resilience, i.e. where it will interfere significantly with a government's ability to manage its affairs to the detriment of its population or an organisation's ability to conduct its operations to the detriment of its workforce or the people it is aiming to serve.

    The syllabus will include:

    • Introduction to crisis management
    • How and why crises occur
    • Making sense of crises
    • International, regional and national laws relating to crises
    • Comparative analysis of the way different countries and organisations approach crisis management
    • Leadership during crises and the effects of stress on the decision-making process
    • Examination of a range of crises at international, national and local levels
    • A crisis table-top exercise.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module, students will be able to:

  • Describe the anatomy of a crisis
  • Recognise the importance of and illustrate how to scan the horizon for future crises
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the significance of crises in the context of how they affect people and communities
  • Identify the inter-organisational structures and individual skills and knowledge necessary to manage crises effectively, including the principles of integrated crisis management
  • Recognise the implications and effects of stress on those caught up in a crisis, both from the point of view of victims and responders
  • Compile and critically evaluate lessons identified during and following international, national and local crises
  • Have had an opportunity to practice his/her skills in a simulated crisis event.

The Resilience Context

Module Leader
  • Wilkinson, Mrs Edith E.M.D.
Aim

    The aim of this module is to understand the meaning of resilience, appreciate its origins and development as a concept, as well as identify where and how it is used, its limits and implications.

Syllabus

    This module is designed to get students to explore the following topics:

    • Origins and development of the concept of resilience - theoretical underpinnings and study of its key components
    • Resilience issues at various levels - from the individual to society
    • Risk, security and resilience - security and risk theories and their relationship to resilience
    • Implementation approaches : policies in the UK and abroad, resilience and development
    • Limitations of the concept
    • Case studies
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to:

  • Explain the evolution of the resilience concept
  • Define the meaning of the concept and describe its key components
  • Recognise its contemporary applicability in policy and critically evaluate the implementation approaches
  • Demonstrate awareness of core literature pertaining to resilience and describe its relation to the broader sociological and social science framework.

Strategy for Resilience

Module Leader
Aim

    To develop knowledge and understanding of the key concepts and methodologies in the planning and implementation of strategies to achieve resilient organisations, to enable critical evaluation of strategic management, project and programme management and performance management practices within the resilience sector and assess opportunities for improvement.

Syllabus
    • The importance of strategic management in planning for resilience
    • Exploration of models of strategic management
    • Critical evaluation of strategic management tools
    • Understanding the strategy process including the following core elements: strategic analysis, strategy selection and strategy implementation
    • Critical evaluation of change management issues associated with the implementation of strategy within a resilience context and consideration of various models
    • Drivers for and barriers to change, including issues such as strategic drift, process versus content, causes of resistance (enablers and disablers)
    • Introduction to project and programme management concepts
    • Delivering resilient capability: delivering policy through projects – delivery of change
    • Projects and programmes: bodies of knowledge and methodologies (APM, PRINCE, MSP) : including business case, organisation, planning, controls, management of risk and change control
    • Relationship between strategy, project, programme and portfolio
    • Tools and techniques for managing projects and programmes: including an introduction to software tools
    • Change benefit realisation – use of a series of tools to ensure organisations achieve the key outputs desired from transformational change – thereby linking performance with change management
    • Introduction to performance management and its role
    • Examining the importance of performance management in the resilience sector and applied to cross-sectoral work of public institutions
    • Challenges in applying performance management in transitional societies
    • Critical evaluation of tools which enable the implementation of strategy
    • Use of benchmarking as a management tool with detailed discussion of the process and how it is used.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Identify and describe the concepts, theoretical ideas and empirical research findings which underpin the study and management practice of strategy; change management, project and programme management and performance management
  • Distinguish between the different levels of change implementation (project, programme and portfolio) and how they interconnect
  • Discriminate and explain the particular challenges of developing and implementing strategies for organisations operating in uncertain and unpredictable external environments, including post-conflict situations
  • Justify and recommend the use of strategic, change, project and performance management tools and techniques in specific resilience situations
  • Identify and distinguish the particular challenges of developing and implementing strategies for organisations with multiple national and international stakeholders
  • Critically evaluate the utility of the concepts, tools and techniques in the resilience context
  • Select, develop, adapt and populate useful tools and techniques for specific resilience contexts
  • Appraise resilience projects and programmes in terms of key success factors
  • Apply the skills to determine the benefits, outcomes and deliverables from implementation of these techniques, identifying potential problems in the process
  • Develop skills in the processes of strategic thinking – an awareness of what analysis, choice and implementation of strategy require – through applied work on case material and investigations into his/her own organisation’s strategic activities.

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year and the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.

MSc Full-time £17,250
PgDip Full-time £13,900
PgCert Full-time £6,950

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2017 and 31 July 2018.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.

MSc Full-time £17,250
PgDip Full-time £13,900
PgCert Full-time £6,950

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2017 and 31 July 2018.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.

Funding Opportunities

Please contact enquiries@cranfield.ac.uk for more information on funding.

Entry requirements

A first or second class Honours degree or relevant professional equivalent. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

IELTS - 7
TOEFL
- 100
Pearson PTE Academic
- 68
Cambridge English Scale - 190
Cambridge English: Advanced – with a minimum of Grade A
Cambridge English: Proficiency – with a minimum of Grade B

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.



Security clearance for Shrivenham

Some Cranfield University courses are delivered at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham which is a Ministry of Defence (MOD) site. All applicants to courses that are wholly or partially delivered at Shrivenham must complete the BPSS (HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard V4 April 2014) prior to registration on the course or must already hold a security clearance to this level or higher.

Please visit our security clearance page for further information.

Your career

Students may also wish to pursue careers with private security companies, think tanks, within academia or for foreign governments.

Applicants to this degree come from a range of backgrounds. While we have a number of candidates who have recently completed their undergraduate degrees, we also have a significant number who are civil servants working within defence, serving and retired military personnel and those who working within the financial services. The aim of this course is therefore to provide all students with a high quality, and transferable, postgraduate qualification.

The course therefore assists in taking you on to senior positions in the armed forces, government, international organisations, media and academia.

CDS CISR Buhari Madaki

The course was very beneficial to me as a military officer. It enabled me to contribute to the management and eventual resolution of a conflict.

Buhari Michael Madaki, Lieutenant Colonel

Applying

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview. Applicants based outside of the UK may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.

Apply Now