This course considers some of the most pressing issues of world politics such as the causes of war and peace, the pressures and opportunities of globalisation, the threats posed by terrorism, and the problems of global poverty and injustice.

At a glance

  • Start dateSeptember
  • DurationMSc: One year full-time. PgCert/PgDip: Up to one year full-time.
  • DeliveryThere are a variety of assessment methods including written assignments, individual and group presentations, dissertation and examinations.
  • QualificationMSc, PgDip, PgCert
  • Study typeFull-time

Who is it for?

This course is intended to attract students who are either currently employed in posts relating to Security Cooperation or those individuals who generally have an interest in issues pertaining to defence and security.

Students come from the following areas:

  • Serving members of the UK MOD (civilian and military)
  • Foreign MOD civil servants and members of foreign armed forces
  • Staff from other UK and foreign government departments, as well as international
  • Governmental and non-governmental organisations, who have an identified need to develop their knowledge of Defence and Security
  • Civilians with an interest in defence and security.

There is often a wide range of nationalities on the course, with a maximum of 30 places available.

Why this course?

The course content is dynamic, challenging, and cutting edge, designed to equip you with the skills and insights needed to understand and authoritatively analyse contemporary debates in international relations using a mixture of theoretical and empirical tools to deal with and confront the challenges presented by contemporary world politics.

The course draws upon our established expertise in international security, foreign and defence policy analysis, security studies, international law, conflict resolution, and environmental issues.

Course details

The course consists of three core modules and a wide range of elective modules, of which you must pass seven, followed by a dissertation.

Assessment

There are a variety of assessment methods including written assignments, individual and group presentations, dissertation and examinations.

University Disclaimer

Keeping our courses up-to-date and current requires constant innovation and change. The modules we offer reflect the needs of business and industry and the research interests of our staff and, as a result, may change or be withdrawn due to research developments, legislation changes or for a variety of other reasons. Changes may also be designed to improve the student learning experience or to respond to feedback from students, external examiners, accreditation bodies and industrial advisory panels.

To give you a taster, we have listed the core modules and some optional modules affiliated with this programme which ran in the academic year 2017–2018. There is no guarantee that these modules will run for 2018 entry. All modules are subject to change depending on your year of entry.

Compulsory modules
All the modules in the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Study Skills and Research Methodology

Module Leader
  • Dr Anna Maria Brudenell
Aim

    To assess the utility of a variety of learning and research methods enabling students to select the appropriate means through which to complete their studies in defence and security.

Syllabus
    • effective learning and study skills;
    • assess the advantages and disadvantages of the main research methods;
    • acquire the skills for conducting and analysing academic research;
    • examine and apply a flexible and multiple methods’ approach to help deal with the broader needs of multi-disciplinary studies;
    • design, conduct and write-up research proposals;
    • acquire transferable new skills in presenting and communicating research to different audiences; 
    • data collection and data analysis.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • determine the correct tools and skills for effective study at the Masters level;
  • gain the technical expertise needed to complete the degree and to produce oral and written academic work;
  • conduct a book review;
  • prepare a research proposal for a Master’s level dissertation;
  • utilise primary and secondary research effectively;
  • demonstrate familiarity with the accepted system and conventions for referencing and presenting academic work;
  • organise material and communicate the methodology and conclusions effectively within academia and more widely.

Issues in International Security, Conflict and Development

Module Leader
  • Dr Thomas O'Brien
Aim

    The module will give a broad understanding of the environment in which a wide range of multilateral, national, and non-state actors public and private sector organisations in both developed and developing countries address broader security, development and post conflict reconstruction challenges.

Syllabus
    • Defining security
    • International relations theory
    • Global, national and human security trends
    • Assessing the risks to security
    • The concept of state-building and state formation
    • Challenges of state-building in the 'non-Weberian' state, and the need for local political legitimacy
    • Post-conflict security and international interventions
    • The impact of the securitisation of the human security agenda
    • Geopolitical trends and implications for state security sectors and sub-regional efforts to promote peace and security
    • The relationship between security and development
    • Macro-government security policy and implementation frameworks
    • Key actors, roles and responsibilities across the international, regional and subregional security communities.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Apply relevant theories to the analysis of security, conflict and development
  • Critically analyse trends with the human security domain
  • Identify threats to security
  • Appraise the role of state and non-state security actors within difference transitional societies
  • Recognise the contribution of both political and management science to the analysis of international security
  • Critically analyse the role played by international, regional and sub-regional security organisations
  • Demonstrate how international security management issues go beyond national boundaries and impact regional and sub-regional structures
  • Critically evaluate a country's overall security sector and assess the challenges it poses to the wider development agenda
  • Communicate effectively to a specialised and non-specialised audience the concepts and findings associated with international security.

Defence in the 21st Century

Module Leader
  • Cleary, Dr Laura L.J.R.
Aim

    To understand the changing nature of civil-military relations, and in the process identify the likely roles for defence forces in the 21st Century.

Syllabus
    • The theories of civil-military relations
    • The role(s) of armed forces in democracies and other regime types
    • Why do armies engage in coups d’état?
    • Introduction to the governance and management of defence
    • The domestic legal framework for defence
    • The international legal framework for defence.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Critically assess and apply the theories which underpin the study of civil-military relations
  • Analyse the dominant trends in civil-military relations
  • Compare and contrast civil-military relations in different regions of the world
  • Recognise the legal constraints on the use of force.

Elective modules
A selection of modules from the following list need to be taken as part of this course

Diplomacy and Conflict Resolution

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    To develop a systematic understanding of institutions and processes of diplomacy, regional integration and global governance thus enabling participants to evaluate the dynamics of conflicts and to determine feasible methods of resolution.

Syllabus
    • Historical and comparative approaches to diplomacy
    • Diplomatic theory and practice
    • Conflict dynamics and conflict typology
    • Case study analysis of different regional conflicts and peace processes
    • Theories and practices of peacekeeping
    • Developing a conflict prevention plan and the preventive measures matrix.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Identify the historical and contemporary conditions in which particular diplomatic processes and strategies can be assessed.
  • Assess major humanitarian and political issues through the application of knowledge of diplomacy.
  • Model the evolution of conflicts using relevant data, concepts and models.
  • Recognise existing mechanisms for conflict prevention and resolution and evaluate and appraise their limitations.
  • Critically evaluate different peace processes.
  • Draw conclusions and communicate policy-relevant recommendations for conflict transformation and resolution, individually and by working with others.
  • Validate extant theories and practices of conflict prevention.
  • Identify and select preventive measures and means for the nonviolent resolution of conflicts.
  • Develop and explain conflict prevention plans.

Managing Defence in the Wider Security Context

Module Leader
  • Cleary, Dr Laura L.J.R.
Aim

    The module will enhance the student’s knowledge, professional understanding and analytical skills necessary to improve and/or transform the governance and management of their defence and security systems.

Syllabus
    • Security within the international context
    • Evolution of the state and current challenges to state sovereignty
    • Governance of Defence (including sessions on accountability, policy formation, leadership and ethics)
    • Management of Defence (including sessions on strategic analysis and planning, risk management, acquisition, project management, finance, HRM and change management).
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Understand current security concepts, systems and issues
  • Identify key challenges faced by specified security sector stakeholders
  • Evaluate existing security systems
  • Evaluate current governance concepts, systems and challenges
  • Recognise the relationship between good governance, good leadership and good management in the provision of enhanced security
  • Relate the theoretical concepts of governance to the realities of the civil-military relationship within selected states
  • Understand current management concepts, systems and challenges as they apply to the management of defence
  • Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of selected defence management theories and practices
  • Identify appropriate leadership philosophies and management practices to advance security sector development.

Counterterrorism and Intelligence

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    To enable participants to analyse and explain current conceptual thinking regarding the nature of terrorism, its origins, motivations and manifestations, together with an in-depth knowledge and critical awareness of the counterterrorism approaches, intelligence approaches and strategies adopted by states. Within the context of counterterrorism, the module also examines the role of intelligence in combating terrorism, the relationship and impacts between intelligence and secrecy, as well as the ethical issues in the use of intelligence.

Syllabus
    • Issues defining terrorism;
    • Conceptual approaches to terrorism;
    • The origins and use of terrorism throughout history;
    • The nature and causes of terrorism;
    • Understanding terrorists: the origins, motivations and manifestations of terrorist groups/organisations and networks;
    • The process of radicalisation;
    • Assessing the success and failure of terrorist groups;
    • Counterterrorism approaches and strategies: assumptions, aims, frameworks and principles;
    • Evaluate the purpose and structures of intelligence function;
    • Identify and assess categories of intelligence (sources, disciplines, organisations);
    • Assess the influence of culture, history, power, and human factors upon the effectiveness of intelligence, assumptions, aims, frameworks and principles;
    • CT strategies, globally, regionally and nationally;
    • The CT ‘Toolkit’.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current conceptual thinking regarding the phenomenon of terrorism and the threat that it poses, graphically, orally and in writing;
  • evaluate terrorist groups in terms of their type, techniques, manifestations and success or otherwise, both today and in the past;
  • critique extant counterterrorism approaches and strategies and evaluate their relative merits in the context of democratic values and human rights;
  • analyse the use of intelligence as an integrated tool of policy-making and evaluate the existent frameworks that prevent intelligence from becoming a political tool;
  • evaluate how terrorist organisations attempt to develop their intelligence capabilities and how counter-intelligence can effectively mitigate against this threat;
  • demonstrate creativity and originality in the development of policy relevant recommendations in the fields of terrorism and counterterrorism.

International Law and Armed Conflicts

Module Leader
  • David Turns
Aim

    The module will enable participants to evaluate and explain authoritatively the significance of international law as it relates to armed conflicts and the deployment of military forces on operations overseas, in terms of both the authority to use force unilaterally or in the maintenance of collective peace and security, and the conduct of hostilities once force is being used.

Syllabus
    • The historical evolution of international attitudes to the legality of the use of force
    • The law of self-defence
    • Humanitarian intervention, armed reprisals and hot pursuit
    • Collective security enforcement, peace enforcement and peacekeeping
    • The scope of application of international humanitarian law
    • Sources and fundamental principles of international humanitarian law
    • Personal status of combatants and civilians
    • Protection of persons and objects in armed conflicts
    • Methods and means of warfare; the law and targeting operations
    • Securing compliance with international humanitarian law
    • Command responsibility.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate expertise on current research on legal aspects of the use of force and the conduct of military operations and be able to relate this to research in other areas of defence and security studies
  • Monitor, analyse, interpret and evaluate contemporary international security and armed conflict events and developments with reference to international law, and to reach provisional legal conclusions on the conduct of such operations as they unfold and before the full range of facts and other data are available
  • Demonstrate the ability to articulate the complexities of legal debates surrounding the use of force and the conduct of military operations in terminology appropriate to the subject, but in a clear and readily understood manner to a non-expert audience.

Strategic Frameworks and Decision Making in the Ancient and Modern Worlds

Module Leader
  • Dr Anastasia Filippidou
Aim

    Through the lens of universal classics applied on a variety of case studies the module will provide an introduction to the key concepts, theories and debates in security and strategic studies. The module will examine the debates over the nature and origins of security issues and their changing character by revisiting and interpreting the ideas of some of the classic thinkers on philosophy and strategy.

Syllabus
    • Apply concepts, theories and methods to analysing political ideas, institutions, practices and issues in the local, international and global arena;
    • Past and present decision-making models and critical thinking;
    • Planning and strategy in antiquity and today;
    • Behavioural theory, psychology and decision-making tools;
    • Case-studies and activities.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Analyse and solve complex problems by critical understanding, analysis and synthesis;
  • Discuss and explore the origins and evolution of security issues;
  • Review and evaluate different interpretations of political issues and events, locally and globally;
  • Identify different decision-making processes and analyse their key components, origin and evolution;
  • Explore and analyse the ongoing applicability of decision-making frameworks and the role and influence of leadership.

Gender, Violence and Armed Conflicts

Module Leader
  • Dr Anicee Van Engeland
Aim

    The module explores gender dimensions, constructs and discourses in relation to violence and armed conflicts. In recent years, policy- and law-makers have become increasingly aware of the fact that the experience men and women have of violence and conflict in the fields of security and defence not only differ; the traditional attribution of gender roles –where the man is the actor (hero, criminal) and the woman acts as a support (nurse) or is a victim (rape victim) - is also not reflective of the reality of war. From female genocidaires in Rwanda to sexually abused men in DRC and the judicial recognition of rape as a war crime, our perception of gender during conflicts has been challenged.

    While most existing courses still focus on the role of women in peace or approach violence and conflict in ways that are either male-centered or gender-neutral, this module seeks to find its methodological inspiration from the international law tradition that has been the most efficient in challenging traditional gender construct during violence and armed conflicts. This is why the course looks into gender as an inclusive concept (male, female, homosexuals, transgender and other) and looks into gender objects (victims, beneficiaries) and subjects (actors, perpetrators). The traditional gender dichotomy will be questioned when looking at agents; nation-states’ approaches to violence and conflict will also be scrutinised to demonstrate how masculinity and femininity are included when it comes to security and defence.

    In this course, students will critically engage with theory and practice. They will be introduced to gender as a multifaceted concept. The emphasis will be placed on security and defence during armed conflicts, but periods of peace or the aftermath of a conflict will also briefly be surveyed. Students will play an important role through class discussions. They will be expected to go through the weekly readings and engage via active learning.

    The module aims at examining the gender dimensions, constructs and narratives in the context of international security and defence, looking at violence and armed conflicts. It looks at how gender impacts on and is impacted by violence and conflict, ranging from men and women in combat to men and women perpetrators of war crimes, including topics such as rape, terrorism and homosexuality.

Syllabus

    INTRODUCTION

    • How does war affect men and women?
    • The gendering of violence, conflict and security

    PART 1: GENDER AND VIOLENCE

    • Sexual violence in the forces
    • Masculinity and Violence
    • Femininity and Violence
    • Women as Perpetrators of Violence: the Abu Ghraib Scandal

    PART 2: GENDER AND ARMED CONFLICT

    • The Distinction between Combatant and Civilian
    • Wartime Sexual Violence
    • Women as Perpetrators of Sexual Violence
    • Sexual Violence against Men

    PART 3: GENDER AND SECURITY 

    • Women in Armed Groups
    • Women in National Militaries
    • Women as Insurgents/Rebels/Guerrillas/Terrorists
    • Feminist Responses to International Terrorism

    CONCLUSION

    Security: beyond Resolution 1325

Intended learning outcomes On successful completion of the module students will be able to:
  • Identify specific issues pertaining to gender, violence and armed conflicts;
  • Critically engage with gender constructs and the concepts of violence and conflict in the wider security and defence sectors;
  • Further research on the relationship between gender and violence/armed conflict/security through a teaching and an active learning experience;
  • Develop competency in analysing key issues pertaining to gender, violence and armed conflicts;
  • Reflect on current theories and critically engage with them to challenge the existing body of knowledge;
  • Develop your ability to apply complex rules and principles, including the ability to think logically and to analyse problems;
  • Become critically aware of the place and function of gender in a security and defence context;
  • Understand and apply original theories and new principles as they pertain to security and defence;
  • Learn an enquiring, analytical and creative approach to work, implementing independent judgment and critical self-awareness;
  • Develop recommendations and solutions;
  • Take a lead role in your own learning, acting autonomously to improve your own skills.

Risk, Crisis and Resilience

Module Leader
  • Edith Wilkinson
Aim
    The aim of this module is to examine the concepts of resilience and risk.  This module will make students assess the meaning of resilience (appreciating its origins, its development and the limits to its implementation), as well as the application of the concept of risk (in the context of risk management) as a key contemporary decision-making framework specifically in the field of security.
Syllabus
    • Risk as concept and Risk theory;
    • Risk management tools  (matrix, register, analytical techniques) and Risk management methodology  - RM cycle and assessment;
    • Risk as contemporary decision-making paradigm and challenges to the risk management paradigm;
    • Complex adaptive systems and resilience thinking;
    • Components  of the implementation approaches to resilience strategies (UK  context - National Security Strategy, CCA, CONTEST, NRR),  Crisis management (Gold-Silver-Bronze), business continuity planning;
    • Case-studies and activities.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  • Introduce systems theory and its relevance to risk, crises and resilience;
  • Review the multifaceted  meaning of the resilience concept and describe its key components and discuss its origins and evolution;
  • Discuss  key contributing risk theories (Cultural theory, Risk homeostasis, Psychological theory, the Precautionary Principle);
  • Appraise the significance of crises in the context of how they affect people and communities and  identify the organisational structures and individual skills and knowledge necessary to manage crises effectively. Describe, distinguish risk and crisis management tools, processes, and frameworks, and critically evaluate (Underlying constructs,  Risk and crisis communication, Politics of decision-making, Human factors in decision-making, Paradoxes with perception and uncertainty);
  • Analyse the contemporary applicability of risk in a resilience strategy and critically evaluate the implementation approaches and consider the politics of resilience.

Regional Security

Module Leader
Aim

    The module will enable participants to analyse, explain and make well-founded policy recommendations regarding current and future regional security issues.

Syllabus

    This module will introduce students to the study of regional security and conflict analysis, a subfield of security studies. The student will first be introduced to the main theoretical approaches to the study of regional security and the role of regional security organisations. 

    These theoretical approaches will be contrasted to approaches focused on international security, and we will ask why it is valuable to study security at the regional level of analysis. Theoretically and empirically, the course will investigate the processes of regionalisation of security that have taken place since the end of the Cold War's global superpower rivalry. It will debate the tensions between regional and globalisation trends and their impact on state sovereignty. 

    The module will also discuss how regional security integration can be achieved and indeed whether such an achievement would be desirable from the perspective of promoting peace and security. The empirical focus of the course in on regionalism in the developing world. The students will be asked to apply their theoretical knowledge to the regional cases. Through such an empirical analysis students will be able to develop linkages between security consideration and how these relate to priorities in foreign policy making.

Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the main theories of regional security; especially Regional Security Complex Theory and the Security Communities approach
  • Examine how historical, geographical, environmental, political and leadership factors influence the security paradigm in regions
  • Explain the key processes of, and implications of, the regionalisation of security after the end of the Cold War
  • Assess the global interests of the United States and other Great Powers in different regions
  • Evaluate the role of regional organisations such in addressing regional and local security problems 
  • Critically assess these theories and interpretations in light of the empirical study of two regions; South Asia and West Africa.

Future Military Conflicts and Support to Disasters

Module Leader
  • Dr Anna Maria Brudenell
Aim
    The aim of this module is to examine the potential changing role of the military in both developed and developing countries; to analyse how hybrid warfare is likely to affect militaries; to enable participants to research the current strategic and security issues, including cyber warfare, hybrid warfare, space warfare; to predict the nature of future conflict; and to propose new forms of warfare.
Syllabus
    • Origins of warfare;
    • Classical military theorists and their relevance today;
    • Definition of ‘symmetric’ and ‘asymmetric’ and types of symmetry and asymmetry;
    • Theorists of asymmetric conflict:  Callwell, Kitson;
    • Future asymmetric warfare;
    • The theory and future practice of land, air and naval power;
    • Coalition warfare;
    • Nuclear strategy;
    • ‘Operations other than war’ and ‘low intensity operations’;
    • Peacekeeping operations;
    • Irregular warfare and Hybrid Warfare; and
    • Cyber warfare.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:

  1. Predict a broad knowledge and understanding of the works of the great military thinkers and those which relate to asymmetric conflict, compare and contrast them with those relating to symmetric conflict, and evaluate their relevance to modern operations;
  2. Analyse ‘low intensity operations’ and ‘operations other than war’;
  3. Analyse the theory and practice of peacekeeping and recent intervention operations;
  4. Speculate upon the development of guerrilla warfare and partisan operations and evaluate their effect on political outcomes and, where relevant, conventional military campaigns;
  5. Critique deterrence theory and nuclear strategy;
  6. Speculate upon the likely nature of future threats and responses; and
  7. Model the likely nature of future conflict.

International Interventions for Peace and Statebuilding

Module Leader
  • Dr Gemma Collantes Celador
Aim

    The module will provide students with a theoretical, empirical and comparative introduction to the key concepts, debates and assumptions underlying international approaches to peace and statebuilding.

Syllabus
    • Basic concepts, conditions and factors motivating international intervention
    • Actors: international, regional, national and local
    • Peacebuilding strategy: approaches and critiques
    • Statebuilding: policies, approaches and lessons
    • Contextual specificity versus global templates
    • Simulation on security, justice and governance reform
    • Bottom up approaches: community recovery in theory and practice
    • Implications for post conflict development.
Intended learning outcomes

On successful completion of the module students should be able to:

  • Compare and contrast international responses to peacebuilding and statebuilding
  • Identify challenges to international interventions from a number of perspectives
  • Create and adapt a basic plan for intervention and post conflict development
  • Develop logical planning skills for contextual analysis that can be implemented in practice
  • Assess the merits and challenges of adopting a top down versus bottom up approach
  • Evaluate the impact and consequences of international interventions in security, justice, governance and community recovery from a range of perspective.

Fees and funding

European Union students applying for university places in the 2017 to 2018 academic year and the 2018 to 2019 academic year will still have access to student funding support. Please see the UK Government’s announcement (21 April 2017).

Cranfield University welcomes applications from students from all over the world for our postgraduate programmes. The Home/EU student fees listed continue to apply to EU students.

MSc Full-time £19,000
PgDip Full-time £15,300
PgCert Full-time £7,650

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2018 and 31 July 2019.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • For self-funded applicants a non-refundable £500 deposit is payable on offer acceptance and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.



MSc Full-time £19,000
PgDip Full-time £15,300
PgCert Full-time £7,650

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2018 and 31 July 2019.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • For self-funded applicants a non-refundable £500 deposit is payable on offer acceptance and will be deducted from your overall tuition fee.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

For further information regarding tuition fees, please refer to our fee notes.



Funding Opportunities

Please contact studentfunding@cranfield.ac.uk for more information on funding.


Entry requirements

A first or second class Honours degree or relevant professional equivalent. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.

English Language

If you are an international student you will need to provide evidence that you have achieved a satisfactory test result in an English qualification. The minimum standard expected from a number of accepted courses are as follows:

In addition to these minimum scores you are also expected to achieve a balanced score across all elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low.

We can only accept tests taken within two years of your registration date (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Students requiring a Tier 4 (General) visa must ensure they can meet the English language requirements set out by UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) and we recommend booking a IELTS for UKVI test.

Security clearance for Shrivenham

Some Cranfield University courses are delivered at the Defence Academy of the United Kingdom, Shrivenham which is a Ministry of Defence (MOD) site. All applicants to courses that are wholly or partially delivered at Shrivenham must complete the BPSS (HMG Baseline Personnel Security Standard V4 April 2014) prior to registration on the course or must already hold a security clearance to this level or higher.

Please visit our security clearance page for further information.



Your career

Students may also wish to pursue careers with private security companies, think tanks, within academia or for foreign governments.

Applicants to this degree come from a range of backgrounds. While we have a number of candidates who have recently completed their undergraduate degrees, we also have a significant number who are civil servants working within defence, serving and retired military personnel and those who working within the financial services. The aim of this course is therefore to provide all students with a high quality, and transferable, postgraduate qualification.

The course therefore assists in taking you on to senior positions in the armed forces, government, international organisations, media and academia.

CDS CISR Buhari Madaki

The course was very beneficial to me as a military officer. It enabled me to contribute to the management and eventual resolution of a conflict.

Buhari Michael Madaki, Lieutenant Colonel

Applying

Applicants may be invited to attend an interview. Applicants based outside of the UK may be interviewed either by telephone or video conference.

Apply now