Information Capability Management MSc/PgCert/PgDip

Full-time/Part-time

Information Capability Management

Organisations operate within increasingly unpredictable, competitive, constrained and demanding environments. Information is crucial to their success as it is required for decision making at all levels. Consequently there is a need to understand the strategic importance of information and develop agile, effective and secure ways to exploit it to its full potential. To do this, effective information capability management must be developed throughout the organisation so that the right information is available to the right people at the right time in an effective, efficient and secure manner. 

An appropriate infrastructure is required to enable effective information capability management to address strategic business needs. This is dependent on joined-up systems of processes, technology and appropriately skilled, competent and motivated people focused on delivering clearly understood business benefit. The Information Capability Management (ICM) MSc has been developed to address these important issues. 



Course overview

MSc students must complete a taught phase consisting of twelve modules, followed by an individual dissertation in a relevant topic. 

PgDip students are required to undertake the same taught phase as the MSc, but without the individual dissertation.

PgCert students must complete the core module (Foundations of Information Systems) together with five other modules.

Individual Project

The Individual Project is the opportunity for a student to utilise and demonstrate their understanding of the taught phase of the course by applying their learning to a real world problem. It is also an opportunity to develop skills and achieve a greater level of understanding in a specific area or areas of relevance to the course. Students are allocated a supervisor and have access to subject matter experts to support them in the project phase.

Modules

Qualifications achieved by completing:
PgCert: Foundations of Information Systems and any five other modules
PgDip: All modules
MSc: All modules and the dissertation.

Core

  • Cyber Security and Information Assurance
    Module LeaderDr Debi Ashenden - Reader in Cyber Security
    Syllabus
    • Foundations of  Cyber Security and IA
    • Risk theory and practice
    • Strategy
    • Threats and vulnerabilities
    • Governance and management
    • Socio-Technical perspectives.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module a diligent student should be able to:

    • Design and assess organisation - wide processes to ensure good Cyber Security and IA
    • Evaluate Cyber Security and IA risk from a nation state, societal and organisational perspective
    • Assess the dependencies between people, process and technology when  developing risk mitigation strategies for Cyber Security and IA.
  • Dissertation
    Module LeaderDr Annie Maddison Warren - Lecturer In IT Professional Development
    Syllabus

    Students work independently but with guidance from a supervisor to apply their acquired knowledge to a relevant issue in their named award. The dissertation provides an opportunity to carry out an in-depth specialised study of a topic of personal and/or professional interest. It enables the integration of theoretical and practical aspects of a topic, revealing an understanding of theoretical principles and how they can be applied in the chosen area of research.

    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module the student will be able to:


    Knowledge

    • Draw upon technical, social, theoretical and practical elements of the taught modules in order to synthesise information management and technology solutions to real world organisational problem situations
    • Relate theory and concepts to evidence
    • Produce and revise project management plans in order to meet objectives
    • Plan a large scale research investigation, using and applying appropriate research methodologies within the selected research field


    Skills

    • Conduct an independent and large-scale research project, including the writing and modifying of a proposal, data preparation, collection and analysis in the compilation of a major project
    • Demonstrate the ability to critically appraise and integrate a large body of published research
    • Demonstrate problem solving skills
    • Write clearly and effectively, meeting approved criteria for formal presentation of a project
    • Act as a source of professional advice and expertise in development and implementation
    • Display evidence of independent learning and originality in a topic related to the student’s named award
  • Emerging Technology Monitoring
    Module LeaderMr Ian Owens - Lecturer in Information Systems
    Syllabus
    • Generic Methods and Tools – horizon scanning, predictive methods, procurement, defence specific issues, risk management, evaluation, maintaining personal awareness
    • Emerging Technologies  – a selection of currently relevant technologies will be studied.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Appraise emerging technologies
    • Evaluate emerging technology that are likely to impact on national security and defence in the next five years
    • Contrast the methods available for identifying and managing the risks and benefits of the use of emerging technology.

    Skills

    • Exploit emerging technologies in relevant working practices
    • Compare and contrast emerging information technologies appropriate to a particular scenario in order to assess potential business benefit.
  • Foundations of Information Systems
    Module LeaderMr Ross Harris - Lecturer
    Syllabus
    • Course structure and the information profession
    • Information systems overview
    • Enabling technologies overview
    • Information systems modelling
    • Research methods, learning and study skills.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Appraise the key academic concepts and language of current Information Systems foundation knowledge, research and practice.

    Skills

    • Critically evaluate published research
    • Conduct independent research
    • Write academically credible and professional report.
  • Methods and Tools for Information Systems Development
    Module LeaderMr Ian Owens - Lecturer in Information Systems
    Syllabus
    • Software Development Lifecycle Models
    • Systems vs reductionist thinking
    • IS development methodologies 
      • Hard
      • Soft
      • Agile
    • Information Systems Failure
    • Alternative approaches to IS development:
      • Enterprise Resource Planning Systems
      • Commercial, off-the-shelf (COTS)-based development.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Justify the selection of information methods and tools relevant to the planning and organisation of information systems development projects at the organisational level
    • Understand the wider organisational and environmental issues that contribute to successful information systems development.

    Skills

    • Appraise software development lifecycle process models
    • Critically compare information systems development methodologies
    • Evaluate the importance of the philosophies underlying different information systems development methodologies
    • Evaluate competing analysis and design techniques.
  • Organisation Development
    Module LeaderDr Annie Maddison Warren - Lecturer In IT Professional Development
    Syllabus
    • Organisation development
    • Organisational change
    • Systems thinking
    • IT project implementation
    • New technology in the workplace.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Describe and critique the key principles of systems and systems thinking
    • Evaluate theories proposing organisations as systems
    • Review and plan improvements to organisational procedures governing change management.

    Skills

    • Appraise the principles of systems thinking in relation to the exploration and management of problems in organisations
    • Appraise people-centric issues that can positively contribute to, or hamper, the design and implementation of information systems
    • Evaluate and analyse business processes, identify alternative solutions, assess feasibility and recommend new approaches.
  • Professional Issues
    Module LeaderDr Annie Maddison Warren - Lecturer In IT Professional Development
    Syllabus
    • Legislation and regulations of relevance to the information systems professional (e.g. Data Protection, Copyright, Computer Misuse etc)
    • Professional responsibilities, professional societies and codes of practice (e.g. those of British Computer Society)
    • Contemporary issues relating to information technology management.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

    Knowledge
    • Evaluate and contribute to the debate on issues of importance to today’s information systems users and professionals
    • Appraise how legislation and regulation affect the context within which information systems professionals’ work.
    Skills
    • Interpret legal and regulatory issues in relation to professional practice
    • Compare and evaluate the relevant professional societies and their codes of practice
    • Interpret contemporary professional issues in relation to personal experience.
  • Programme and Project Management for Information Systems
    Module LeaderDr Annie Maddison Warren - Lecturer In IT Professional Development
    Syllabus
    • Programme management
    • Project management
    • Tools and techniques (Gantt, Pert, etc)
    • Project teams, leadership and management.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

     

    Knowledge
    • Critically appraise the management of projects involving the development and implementation of information systems in order to co-ordinate a portfolio of projects that achieve benefits of strategic importance
    • Critically analyse project management roles and responsibilities from a senior team leadership perspective in order to be able to identify areas for improvement.
    Skills
    • Evaluate approaches to programme and project management to determine sound practice
    • Critique real life experience of programme and project management in order to determine the factors that generate project success.
  • Software Engineering (IS)
    Module LeaderDr Oliver Buckley - Lecturer
    Syllabus
    • Software Engineering Foundations
      • Introducing the problem
      • Introduction to Software Engineering – software product life cycles and software engineering processes
      • Requirements analysis
      • Software design, implementation, reuse and maintenance
      • Selecting a programming language.
    • Software Modelling Techniques
      • Justification and benefits
      • Case study – Unified Modelling Language.
    • Building Confidence (Verification, Validation, Testing, Analysis, QA, Reviews)
      •  Reviews and inspections
      • Software testing.
    • Human Computer Interaction
      • Foundations and justifications for good Human Computer Interface (HCI) design
      • Modelling and design tools for HCI.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Explain the difficulties associated with the development and maintenance of large and/or high integrity software-intensive systems, and the role of software engineering in addressing these
    • Critically evaluate the variety of process models available for managing the development and maintenance of software systems, and be able to select appropriate models for given circumstances
    • Explain the significance of requirements and design specification within software engineering and the importance of modelling in these activities
    • Critically evaluate different approaches necessary to achieve a range of non-functional attributes
    • Outline the capabilities and limitations of software testing and quality management techniques as means of both reporting on and achieving the required levels of software quality
    • Explain how modern systems model knowledge and how reasoning can be added to systems.

    Skills

    • Discuss software development in an analytical manner
    • Critically evaluate the major approaches to software development
    • Critical review of modelling approaches and the ability to produce simple models and understand more complex ones
    • Be able to design the user interface component of a complex software system.
  • Strategic Application of Information Systems
    Module LeaderMr Ross Harris - Lecturer
    Syllabus
    • Strategy and strategic information systems in context
    • Strategic analysis
    • Strategy development
    • Analytical tools
    • Information systems and strategy alignment.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Formulate Information Systems (IS) strategy and plans appropriate to a particular organisation and its environment.
    • Appraise issues relating to the implementation and maintenance of IS strategy.
    • Justify in terms of organisational business benefit strategies for the management of information and applications.

    Skills

    • Analyse and refine organisational strategy and policy for a selected organisation in order to identify the core competencies to be supported by IS.
    • Align organisational business and IS strategy for a selected organisation such that the IS strategy supported the business objectives.
    • Review strategy for a selected organisation against relevant legislative and professional issues to identify gaps.
    • Justify the selection of methods and tools relevant to the formulation of information strategy and plans.
  • Systems Architecture
    Module LeaderDr Duncan Hodges - Lecturer in Information Systems Management
    Syllabus
    • What is Systems Architecture?
    • Representation of architectures
    • Information systems quality attributes
    • Architectural strategies (styles) and tactics
    • Architectural design
    • Evaluation of architectures
    • Architectural frameworks
    • Information systems technology.
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of this module students should be able to:

    Knowledge

    • Differentiate between different architectural strategies and tactics based on their cost, effectiveness and user needs
    • Critically evaluate Information Systems (IS) architectures against business needs.

    Skills

    • Distinguish the steps required to develop an IS architecture
    • Appraise the variety of approaches to architecture development driven by the different architectural frameworks, such as:
      • The Open Group Architecture Framework
      • Department of Defense Architecture Framework
      • Ministry of Defence Architecture Framework
    • Critically compare the underlying IS technology which determines the selection of the architectural strategies and tactics
    • Evaluate the importance of the philosophies underlying different IS development methodologies
    • Evaluate competing analysis and design techniques.
  • Data-led Decision Support
    Module LeaderDr Oliver Buckley - Lecturer
    Syllabus
    • Information Visualisation
    • Data mining pipeline
    • Big Data models for exploring data
    • Data analytics
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

    • Design appropriate visualisations based on user requirements.
    • Appraise current practices for decision support in organisations.
    • Contrast methods of analysing data to enable business intelligence.
    • Assess the appropriateness of big data models for generating insight

  • Data Modelling, Storage and Management
    Module LeaderDr Duncan Hodges - Lecturer in Information Systems Management
    Syllabus
    • Data, Information and Knowledge
    • Introduction to data storage technologies
    • Data retrieval techniques
    o Structure Query Language (SQL)
    o Physical storage
    o Semantic web


    • Non-traditional models for data storage
    o NoSQL
    o Big Data
    o Cloud
    Intended learning outcomes

    On successful completion of the module the student will be able to:

    • Differentiate between data, information and knowledge in business contexts.
    • Design suitable data models for efficient storage and retrieval.
    • Compose appropriate queries to translate data into information.
    • Appraise the applicability of non-traditional models for storage within an organisation

Assessment

Spread throughout the programme and includes coursework, group presentations and examinations during the taught phase and for the MSc a research based dissertation.

Start date, duration and location

Start date: Full Time: September / Part Time: September

Duration: Full-time MSc - one year, Part-time MSc - up to three years, Full-time PgCert - one year, Part-time PgCert - two years, Full-time PgDip - one year, Part-time PgDip - two years

(For MOD status students the duration may vary, subject to annual review.)

Teaching location: Shrivenham

Overview

Skilled professionals are needed to enable organisations to realise the strategic benefits that successfully exploiting information can provide. Success in business of all types and in all sectors, both public and private, is dependant on:

  • Understanding the value of information as a strategic asset.
  • Developing agile, effective and efficient systems that make this information available. 
  • Countering cyber threats with appropriate cyber security. 

The internationally recognised Information Capability Management course successfully supports the development of these professionals. Students from Government departments, industry and other organisations within the UK and internationally come together to study and discuss issues and develop skills that will enable solutions now and in the future.

Key goals of the course are to provide students with postgraduate level education in order to:

  • Develop in individuals an awareness of the management, user and supplier communities.
  • Recognise the stakeholder roles, needs and expectations within these communities.
  • Enable effective communication and a shared understanding between these stakeholders in order to meet capability objectives.
  • Master the principles and practice that underlie the delivery of effective, efficient and secure systems in various business spaces that exploit information in order to provide strategic benefit.

Informed by industry

The Information Capability Management MSc has an External Advisory Panel that is made up of senior stakeholders from Government, industry, academia and professional bodies that meet to provide input regarding the strategic direction of the course. This input helps ensure that the course remains relevant and is aligned with the needs of businesses in various sectors both public and private.

Your teaching team

Entry Requirements

Normally a first or second class Honours degree or equivalent in science, engineering or mathematics. Alternatively, a lesser qualification together with appropriate work experience may be acceptable.

English Language

Note that this course requires a higher level of English proficiency than the University's minimum requirement.

Students whose native language is not English must have attained any of the following as evidence of English language ability:

In addition to these minimum overall test scores, you are expected to achieve a balanced score across the reading, writing, listening and speaking elements of the test. We reserve the right to reject any test score if any one element of the test score is too low. Please note that we will only accept tests taken within two years of the start date of your course (with the exception of Cambridge English tests which have no expiry date).

Further information on entry requirements.


Fees

Home EU Student Fees

MSc Full-time - £16,250

MSc Part-time - £16,250 *

PgDip Full-time - £13,900

PgDip Part-time - £13,900 *

PgCert Full-time - £6,950

PgCert Part-time - £6,950 *

Overseas Fees

MSc Full-time - £16,250

MSc Part-time - £16,250 *

PgDip Full-time - £13,900

PgDip Part-time - £13,900 *

PgCert Full-time - £6,950

PgCert Part-time - £6,950 *

*

Students will be offered the option of paying the full fee up front, or to pay in four equal instalments at six month intervals (i.e. the full fee to be paid over the first two years of their registration). 

Fee notes:

  • The fees outlined apply to all students whose initial date of registration falls on or between 1 August 2016 and 31 July 2017.
  • All students pay the tuition fee set by the University for the full duration of their registration period agreed at their initial registration.
  • A deposit may be payable, depending on your course.
  • Additional fees for extensions to the agreed registration period may be charged and can be found below.
  • Fee eligibility at the Home/EU rate is determined with reference to UK Government regulations. As a guiding principle, EU nationals (including UK) who are ordinarily resident in the EU pay Home/EU tuition fees, all other students (including those from the Channel Islands and Isle of Man) pay Overseas fees.

Funding

Full funding is available (the course is free at point of delivery) for UK MOD staff. 

For all other applicants please contact prospectus.shrivenham@cranfield.ac.uk  for more information on funding

Application Process

UK Military and MOD Civil Service applicants

Please complete a Postgraduate Application Form.

All other applicants

Please complete and send to us your:


Career opportunities

Takes you on to further senior career opportunities and to become one of the next generation of senior professionals delivering business benefit through exploitation of information with skills in appropriate areas including business analysis, strategy development and implementation, information assurance, cyber security, organisational development and strategic application of information systems.

Related areas